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index to Television Digest, 1954: Volume 10 

References are grouped into three major categories: General (pages 1-6), Manufacturers & Merchandisers 
(page 6), Supplemen^ts (page 1). Index attempts to cover only items considered to be of more than passing interest 
Reference numbers following each item designate issue and page of Newsletter in which item appeared 



General 



ADVERTISING 

top agencies in 1953, 1 :8. 10 :12 
Publishers Information Bureau figures on TV- 
radio billings, 1:16, 5:16, 10:12, 14:14, 18:12, 
22:16, 26:16, 31:14, 35:14, 39:16, 44:14, 49:16 
FCC station-network statistics, 1:16, 21:1, 24:4, 
43:5, 61:16 

total advertising in 1953, 2:7 

top media in 1953, 5:9 

Rorabaugh reports, 6:12 

cost-per-thousand down, 8:6 

New York proposes tax on agencies, 15:9 

rate trends, 18:1, 22:7, 27:6 

NARTB’s Tower says TV getting mostly new 
money, 25:12 

top advertisers in 1953, 27 :7 
310 stations in electrical anniversary, 30:7 
‘Printers’ Ink’ 1953 figures, 33:4, 34:14 
sustainers deserving sponsors, 33:7 
top advertisers in first half 1954, 36:7 
$20,000,000 a year estimated for network keys, 
36:8 

'Advertising Age’ asks why TV is “so hungry,’’ 
36:8 

brassiere commercials, 36:14 
TV taking from other media, 37:6 
best-remembered commercials, 37 :7 
farm market, 39:9 
Biow-Benrus-Bulova changes, 39:10 
TV mfrs. expenditures, 39:12 
Cecil & Presbrey quits, 41 :6 

clearance problems over by 1966, says Frey, 42:12 

WATV ties rates to ratings, 43:8 

beer-wine commercials, 43:14, 44:14, 45:7, 46:6 

•Reader’s Digest’ takes ads, 45:7, 46:7 

full-screen ID, 46:6 

ANA annual meeting, 46:6 

competition forcing heavy expenditures, 47:8 

why advertisers dropped TV, 47:8 

magazine concept analyzed by Bergmann, 48:9 

sponsors’ top brass buying programs, 49:11 

ANA officers, 62:6 

awards for best commercials urged, 52:6 
ALLOCATIONS (see also UHF) 

Whitcfish Bay court decision, 4 ;2 
FCC reversed in Chicago Ch. 2 case, 4 :2 
Court upholds FCC allocation authority in 
Logansport case, 6:3 
z«jne changes, 6:2 

directional antennas, 33:4, 36:8, 49:7 
Zone I height ceiling, 39:3, 48:2, 50:6 
"selective de-intermixture,” 39:3, 43:4, 44:3, 60:6 
WAAM propagation study, 61:6 



AM (Standard) Broadcasting (see also specific net- 
works and Advertising) 
total stations & applications, 1:7, 27:5 
FCC revenue-expense statistics, 1:16, 61:16 
merger of WLS & WENR, Chicago, 7:10 
network rates, 24:7, 25:1, 26:1, 27:7, 29:2, 39:6 
TV operator quitting radio, 31:4, 32:6 
evaluations of networks at Chicago meetings, 
36 

Quality Radio Group, 36:7, 37:12, 42:12, 48:8 
Doherty analysis, 39:6 
250-watt locals seek 1-kw, 39:6 
MBS’ O'Neil on radio future, 43:7 
BAB changes name to Radio Advertising Bureau 
47:16 

Sarnoff on network future, 48:7 
Kobak urges TV-radio separation, 48:9 



Station Sales 

WGAR, Cleveland, O., 1:16 
KPOA, Honolulu, T. H„ 3:2 
WINS, New York, N. 'Y., 6:8 
KSUO, San Diego, Cal., 13:16 
WLCS, Baton Rouge, La., 13:16, 17:12 
KHON, Honolulu, T. H., 13:16 
WGKV, Charleston, W. Va., 16:6 
WAMS, Wilmington, Del., 16:6 
WNEW, New 'York, N. 'Y., 16:12 
WGR, Buffalo, N. Y., 17:1 
WTIK, Durham, N. C., 17:12 
KFEL, Denver, Colo., 17:12 
WHKC, Columbus, O., 17:12 
WKDA, Nashville, Tenn., 19:7 
KCBQ, San Diego, Cal., 19:14, 26:14 



WIBM, Jackson, Mich., 21:16, 25:14 
WTMA, Charleston, S. C., 22:16, 26:15 
KYOS, Merced, Cal., 22:16 
WSAU, Wausau, Wis., 23:14 
WGXTY, Bangor, Me., 26:16 
KXOC, Chico, Cal., 26:15 
WTBO, Cumberland, Md., 32:14, 36:9 
WINI, Murphysboro, 111., 33:10 
WGMA, Hollywood, Fla., 33:10 
WNMP, Evanston, 111,, 34:8 
WJBF, Augusta, Ga., 34:14 
WEAN, Providence, R. I., 35:7 
WHOT, South Bend, Ind., 36:9 
WSIR, Winter Haven, Fla., 36:9 
WHOO, Orlando, Fla., 36:9 
KMO, Tacoma, Wash., 36:14 
WJJJ, Montgomery, Ala., 39:16, 41:13 
WMIN, St. Paul, Minn., 40:6 
KFBI, Wichita, Kan., 41:8, 45:9 
WHLD, Niagara Falls, N. Y., 41:8 
WTRF, Wheeling, W. Va., 41:8 
WJW, Cleveland, O., 41:14 
KJR, Seattle, Wash., 43:14, 45:9 
WGTC, Greenville, N. C., 43:14, 46:9 
WJW, Cleveland, O., 43:14, 46:9 
KQV, Pittsburgh, Pa., 44:4 
WIBG, Philadelphia, Pa., 46:9, 60:8 
KCOM, Sioux City, la., 46 :9 
WPWA, Chester, Pa., 47:16 
WESK, Escanaba, Mich., 50:8 
WORC, Worcester, Mass., 60:8 
KOAT, Albuquerque, N. M., 60:8 
KRSN, Los Alamos, N. M., 60:8 
KBOX, Modesto, Cal., 60:8 



AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. (ABC) 
triple exposure plan, 8:6 
ratings climb, 9:12 

financial reports, 13:16, 17:12, 30:12, 43:12 

Disney deal, 14:1, 20:8, 43:8 

personnel shake-up, 39:7 

Theatre Guild consultative contract, 43:8 

owned stations getting maximum power, 46:8 

‘Disneyland’ success, 47:9 

"magazine concept” program, 49:9 



ANTENNAS, TRANSMITTING — see Equipment, 
Telecasting 

ANTI-TRUST (see also Patents) 

ad agency study by Justice Dept., 6:11 
Justice Dept, files against Schine, 11:13 
NED A consent judgment, 27:12 
16mm suit, 43:7 

Govt, moves against RCA patent pool, 47:1, 48:14 
Govt, suit against Philco, 51:1 

APPLICATIONS & CPs FOR NEW TV STA- 
TIONS (see also UHF) 
multiple ownership, 3:3, 6:3, 6:1, 39:3 
Westinghouse seeks clarification of multiple own- 
ership, 3:14, 7:4, 8:3, 13:16 
Senate quiz on multiples, 4:6 
hearing charges get frantic, 6:2 
FCC’s good record in processing, 6:3, 7:7 
Spartanburg site-move case, 6:6, 8:3, 10:3, 28:5 
St. Louis Ch. 11 case, 10:3, 35:6 
San Bernardino turned down, lack of funds, 12:2 
Clarksburg newspaper protest, 13:5, 16:3, 16:2, 
27 *3 » » » 

WHIZ-TV, Zanesville, channel shift, 15:3 
Broadcast Bureau asks reversal in Mobile case, 
17:16 

Storer appeals multiple ownership rules, 24:12 
General Teleradio compliance with multiple own- 
ership, 24:12 

FCC changes hearing rules, 29:7 
FCC hearing rules attacked by bar group, 30:14 
“party in interest” ruling, 31:4 
Easton-Allentown court decision, 34:2, 36:14 
perjury charge in Portland case, 35:6, 36:8. 

38:10, 50:6 
laggards, 37:2 

“5-&-2” ruling, 38:1, 39:16 
diversification theme in decisions, 41:3, 61:3 
“anti-straddling” rule eliminated, 43:4 
CPs for Beaumont & Tampa stayed, 49:2, 51:6, 
52 ‘A 

CBS sales, policies attacked, 49:7, 50:9, 51:6, 
52 A 

NBC Mt. Higby uhf, 51:6 



Supplements and Special Reports Published During 1954 

References are to Issues of Television Digest with articles pertaining to documents 



Directories 



Semi-Annual TV Factbooks of Jan. 16 and July 16; 
with weekly Addenda reporting current FCC 
grants, applications, new stations on air, etc. 

Annual AM-FM Directory of Jan. 1; with weekly 
Addenda reporting current FCC decisions, appli- 
cations, etc. Listings of all AM-FM stations by 
states and frequencies, all applications by states 
and frequencies, call letter lists, etc. (Includes 
other North American stations.) 



Special Supplements and Reports 
Proposed Schedule of License Fees. Charges to be 
made for handling applications, modifications 
and licenses, issued by FCC as notice of rule- 
making. (Vol. 10:5). 



TV Set Ownership by Counties. Total families and 
receivers, by geographic areas, states and coun- 
ties, including vhf and uhf breakdown, prepared 
for CBS-TV by A. C. Nielsen Co. (Vol.l0:9). 



Proposed Restrictions on Spurious Radiations. Full 
text of FCC’s notice of rule-making specifying 
limits for various services and providing for 
system of equipment certification. (Vol. 10:16). 

Color TV Appraised by Network Presidents. Full 
texts of speeches by Frank Stanton and Sylvester 
I- Weaver Jr., on present status and immediate 
prospects^ of color, delivered during symposium 
of American Assn, of Advertising Agencies at 
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., April 23, 1954. 
(Vol. 10:18). 



Where the TV Sets Are. J. Walter Thompson Co. 
report on homes with TV as of Jan. 1, 1964, 
covering the 340 top markets, giving figures on 
number of homes and receivers, percentage of 
saturation, etc. (Vol. 10:21). 

The Road to Responsibility. Full text of address 



by William S. Paley, chairman, CBS Inc., before 
convention of National Assn, of Radio & TV 
Broadcasters in Chicago, May 25, 1954, on oc- 
casion of his acceptance of NARTB’s 1954 Key- 
note Award. (Vol. 10:22). 

Color Status of Network Affiliates. Station-by-sta- 
hon report on capabilities of NBC-TV and CBS- 
TV affiliates to carry network color or originate 
local slide, film and live color, derived from in- 
formation supplied by networks. (Vol. 10:43). 

Govt. Action Against RCA Patent Pool. Full text 
of complaint filed in civil action by Justice Dept., 
in U. S. Court for Southern District of New 
York, Nov. 19. 1954. charging RCA with oper- 
“tinS) patent pool in restraint of trade. (Vol. 

Govt. Civil Action Against Philco Corp. Full text 
m complaint filed in civil action by Justice 
Dept., in U. S. District Court of Eastern Dis- 
^ict of Pennsylvania. Dec. 15, 1954, charging 
Philco with illegally restricting distributors and 
dealers. (Vol. 10:51). 



Bound Copies Available 

Complete sets of the 1954 Television 
Digest Newsletters, along with the 
two 1954 TV Factbooks, Addenda and 
all Supplements, can be permanently 
bound between embossed hard covers 
and be made available on order at $25 
per volume. 



1 



ASCAP — See Music Atcencies 
BANKRUPTCIES 

Regal Electronics Corp., 1:12 

Jewel Radio, 1:12, 5:15, 7:13 

Tele King, 7:13, 27:12, 39:12 

retail failures per Dun & Bradstreet, 8:9 

Radar Electronics, 9:9 

Muntz, 10:10, 11:11, 12:10, 29:9, 41:11 

summaries, 11:10 

Trad, 15:11 

Video Products Corp., 16:10 
Arcturus Electronics Inc., 22:13 
RETMA notes failures, 25:16 
Kaye-Halbert, 32:13, 35:12 
Freed Electronics, 35:12 
mfr. failures per Dun & Bradstreet, 43:11 
Shaw Television, 52:8 
BOOSTERS & SATELLITES 
Comr. Sterling’s proposals, 7 :1 
Elkins application denied, 12:14 
Adler experiments, 17:5, 17:11, 47:3, 51:9 
RCA experiments, 17:5, 31:14 
Hawaiian applications, 20:8 
Lambda-Pacific unit, 22:10, 49:12 
FCC favorably inclined, 23 :4, 47 :3 
Lawrenceburg outlet discontinued, 23:4 
FCC ruling, 32:4, 33:3, 34:3, 36:4 
Sylvania urges FCC on low power, 35:14 
WJTV asks commercialization, 35:14 
illegal, 36:14, 46:14, 47:3 

applications filed, 38:16, 42:12, 46:8, 49:12, 50:6, 
51:16 

FCC low-power proposal, 51:2 
CENSUS, TV RECEIVER 

J. Walter Thompson, 1:16, 17:16, 21:1 
NBC, 5:16, 6:12, 25:13, 33:16, 37:6, 41:2, 45:7, 
50:14 

CBS-Nielsen, 7:14, 9:1 

Advertising Research Foundation, 15:8, 39:1, 
44:14 

Govt., farm TV, 41:14 
CLOSED-CIRCUIT & THEATRE TV 

closed-circuit business sessions, 1:7, 12:14, 20:8, 
24:9, 37:5, 45:15, 46:6 
Metropolitan Opera, 5:10, 28:8, 46:9 
boxing, 17:15, 21:9, 26:15 
BOTV-MCA tieup, 24:6 
N. Y. Philharmonic, 32:8 

National Theatres cancels equipment order, 34:14 
BOTV legitimate plays, 37 :5 
medical symposia, 37 :5 
roundup, 39:4 

Wilmot Castle distributing GE equipment, 39:14 
church use, 41:6 
animal surgery, 41:6 

new RCA color theatre-TV equipment, 43:14 
TNT buys 50 General Precision units, 43:14, 
47:14 

TOA sees theatre TV defense against fee TV, 
45:15 

new firms, 46 :9 

3-theatre tieup for Notre Dame game, 48:14 
Fleetwood unit, 51:8 
COLOR 

'Tide' survey of advertisers, 1 :9 , 

debate over contributions to system, 1:13, 2:11 

NARDA session, 1:13, 3:9 

AIEE winter convention, 1 :15 

Telechrome test equipment, 2 :7 

dealers confident after seeing color, 2 :9 

newsmen with receivers, 3:7 

DuMont “What’s The Story” discusses color, 3:7 

home use of set, 4:1, 8:2 

IRE color issue, 4 :5 

NTSC dissolved, 6 :7 

color film, 7 :10 

sets offered by N. Y. dept, stores, 7:11 
will affect theatres, says Charles Skouras, 8:11 
Pat Weaver estimates color cost 20-25% extra, 
9:7 

set production estimates in ‘Fortune,’ 9:8 

psychology in advertising, 13:13 

NARTB technical sessions, 14:12 

NARDA advises dealers, 16:10 

program costs, per CBS, 17 :7 

Stanton & Weaver talk to AAA A, 18:1 

agencies’ slzeup, 20:14 

Haile Selassie’s first view, 23:11 

Stanton predicts development, 28:8 

effects on trademarks, 28:8 

AT&T rates postponed, 33:15 

color-corrected network routes, 33:15, 36:9 

British debate about compatibility, 35:13, 37:11 

RCA caravan, 37:11, 40:11, 41:13 

tie-in promotions, 37:11 

roundtable of networks, sponsors, agencies, 37:11 
FCC members' viewing experience, 40:1 
stations equipped for rebroadcast, 41:1 
evolution, not revolution, 42:1 
SMPTE sets film standards, 43:8 
quality of bIack-&-white from color, 43:8 
economist Smythe analyses status, 46:11 
RETMA gets trade assn, award for NTSC work, 
45:13 

Balaban sizeup, 52:7 

Eastman consent decree on color film, 62:7 
Network Facilities 
AT&T schedule, 11:4, 33:15, 35:9 
network affiliates color-equipped, 41:1, 43:1, 44:9 
Programs 

newsmen comment on programs, sets, 1:14, 9:7, 
23:11 

Tournament of Roses Parade, 2:10 
schedules outlined at NARDA meeting, 3:6 
NBC Spot Sales closed-circuit, 3:7 
closed-circuit demonstrations, 5:11 



NBC “spectaculars,” 12:14, 13:3, 30:13, 31:9, 
38:11, 39:16, 40:11, 41:9, 43:7, 44:9, 46:11, 
47:13, 48:13 

costs average 10% more than monochrome, CBS 
estimates, 17 :7 

NBC shows kines, 18:10, 37:11 
importance of film, 19:12 
Metropolitan Museum, 20:14 
NBC mobile unit, 21:15 
tape said to be 1-2 years off, 22:1.5 
3 film processes tested, 22:15 
skin makeup, 22:15 

seen dooming “white” in white goods, 22:15 
Telechrome considers scanner leasing, 22:16 
Ziv heavy on color film, 23:11, 26:14 
Schwerin says weak programs to be helped by 
color at first, 23:11 

CBS program schedule, 24:11, 26:14, 34:9, 35:9 
Weaver points to NBC color capacity, 29:11 
film commercials in preparation, 35 :9 
DuMont and ABC plans, 36:10 
“Lucy” producer considers color inserts, 36:10 
Witting urges color commercials first, 39:15 
Technicolor sees big market, 41:13 
big names, big fees, 42:11 
“Abduction from the Seraglio,” 46:11 
color from black-&-white film, 46:11 
minutes per day, 47 :6 

O'Neil urges producers to unload monochrome 
movies, 60:8 

Station Equipment 

camera deliveries, 3:6, 10:7 
WBAL-TV makes own equipment. 2:7 
station test signals, 4:14, 5:11 
GE-CBS camera tieup, 5:4 
RCA station-equipping plans, 7:4, 8:7, 37:11 
RCA analysis of CBS camera, 7:5 
CTI proposes 1-tube camera, 7:10, 36:10 
FCC notes transmitter requirements, 11:14 
RCA color bar for stations, 12:11, 14:12 
first stations with RCA cameras, 13:8, 16:11, 
17:7, 19:12, 21:15, 21:16, 31:9, 33:15, 36:10, 
38:11, 42:11, 44:1, 46:9, 47:13 
signal generators at IRE convention, 13:14 
WMAR-TV uses of slides, 16:11 
DuMont scanner, 18:2, 26:14, 31:9, 37:11, 42:11, 
47:13, 52:7 

GPL-Wickes tieup, 21:16 
film scanners at NARTB convention, 22:4 
GE scanners shipped, 25:14, 27:13, 34:9 
stations equipped for network color, 26:14, 41:1, 
43:1, 44:9 

NBC film comparisons for producers, 29:11 
roundup on scanners, 35:3 

RCA “3-V” camera. 38:11, 43:13, 48:13, 60:10, | 
51:10, 62:7 

RCA slide equipment, 39:14 
Dage 3-vidicon camera, 41:12, 62:7 
price of camera tubes reduced, 43:13 
Telechrome equipment. 43:13 
pioneers report live color simple, 44 :1 
Tri-Color Tubes & Receivers 
RCA commercializes 16-in. tubes, 1:1 
Hazeltine use of Lawrence tube. 1 :2, 2 :2 
RCA 19-in. & 21-in., 2:1, 4:11, 22:11, 29:1, 30:3, 
41:12, 46:9 

Chromatic Labs making grids, 2:2, 13:14, 20:14 
Rauland tubes, 2:2 

converters, 6:11, 6:6, 7:10, 27:13, 29:11 
RCA receiving tubes, 5:11 
serviceman clinics, 6:7, 7:10 
CBS tube plans. 6:7, 22:11, 28:1, 36:1 
15-in. vs. larger tubes, 7:6, 10:1 
24-in. Lawrence, 8 :7 
Emerson lease plan, 10:1, 12:10, 20:14 
RCA set production plans, 11:9, 13:1 
Westinghouse plans, 11:10 

developmental units at IRE convention, 13:14 
RCA large-scale promotion, 17 :13 
DuMont 19-in. tube. 18:2, 20:14 
slow set sales, 18 :8 
Zenith waiting for 1-gun tube, 18:11 
Chromatic licensees, 27 :13 
set production predictions, 30:13 
projection sets, 31:9, 32:9, 47:13, 49:6, 51:10 
Philco tube. 32:1, 33:16, 46:12 
RETMA production reports, 32:9, 49:7 
RCA cuts 16-in. set price, 33:16 
trade ponders sales problems, 35:10 
Sarnoff evaluates future, 36:12 
standardization urged, 37 :3 
22-in. rectangular, 37 :3 
CBS-Columbia installation charges, 37:11 
RCA 21-in. tube demonstration, 38:3 
Motorola’s Hansen on servicing, 39:16 
N. Y. introduction, 40:8, 41:10, 42:7 
market executives would buy sets with $1000 
“windfall,” 43:13 

Packard dealer gives set with car, 43:13 

city census of sets, 43:13, 44:9, 50:10 

tube patents, 44:9, 61:10 

DuMont on set prices, 44:9 

“chicken-egg state.” say tube makers, 45:13 

RCA components for 21-in., 50:10 

plush selling techniques, 48:13, 61:10 

build-your-own set, 48:13 

RCA components for 21-in., 50:10 

Hoffman’s first 21-in., 60:10 

RCA-CBS agreement on tubes, 61:10 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM (CBS) 
Chicago TV City, 4 :6 

financial reports, 7:13, 14:12, 20:15, 32:14, 46:13 

Nielsen survey of sets, 7:14 

educational programs. 33:8 

Stanton editorial, 36:2, 36:6 

evaluation of radio network, 36:6 



plans for 2 uhf outlets. 36 :7 
network and station profits, 36:7 
station sales & purchases, 42:6, 43:1, 44:4 
agreement with Zenith over Chicago’s Ch. 2, 43:1 
“Extended Market Plan,” 49:4, 50:7, 51:16 
affiliation changes. 50:1 
Stanton stock ownership, 50:13 
educational grants, 52:11 
COMMUNITY ANTENNA SYSTEMS 
anaylsis of directory, 2:5, 24:3, 52:3 
■lerrold color tests, 3:11 
“plus” audience for stations, 3:12 
new operations, 3:12, 7:7, 14:13, 22:8, 29:7, 34:8, 
38:10, 40:4, 41:8, 50:8 
Casper rates, 4 :9 
SKL 8-channel system, 7 :14 
sale of Schuylkill Haven system, 9:5 
classified utility in Wyoming. 16:8, 51:9 
microwaves to feed systems, 19:3, 23:6, 26:8, 
28:8, 39:15, 52:4 

NCTA convention, 20:11, 24:3, 25:7 
attacked by Beacom, 21:8, 35:7 
Magnuson bill to exempt excise tax, 23:6 
Jerrold patent licensing, 24:10 
radio operators attracted, 25 :9 
underground cable, 25:9 
Casper TV grantee drops out. 29:7 
Dubuque franchise fight, 35:7, 37:12, 38:9, 42:6, 
.50 :8 

e.xcise tax, 37:12 

Greenville, Miss, tower collapses, 40 :4 
Doerfer against FCC control, 46:8 
NARTB group opposes, 46:9 
British consider low-cost set, 48:9 
state regulation asked in California, 50:8 
1955 convention set for June 6-8, 50:8 
operator claims choice of 29 signals, 50:8 
longest pickup, 51 :8 
FC(i spurious radiation limits, 52:4 
CONGRESS 

Lee confirmation, 3:5, 4:6, 5:10 
committees, 3:5, 6:7 

TV barred from House Operations Committee, 
6:11 

Senate committee meets FCC, 10 :4 
Kilgore attacks monopolies, 10:7, 11:14, 49:3 
shooting in House. 10:12 

Sen. Edwin Johnson retiring from Senate, 14:7 
Bryson bill liquor hearings, 17:11, 21:16, 26:7, 
27:14, 34:14, 38:8, 40:5, 43:14, 44:14, 45:7, 46:6 
Bricker network regulation bill, 20:1 
bills on sponsorship of proceedings, 22 :9, 26 :9 
gambling bill. 23:14, 29:4 

controversy over televising proceedings, 24:12, 
32:5, 33:16, 34:7, 38:8, 46:6 
Sen. Johnson defends station sales, 26:14 
network investigation, 30:1, 31:1, 32:3, 34:1, 35:1, 
36:14, 37:2, 39:7, 40:1, 41:4, 42:4, 43:14, 62:1 
editorial on investigation, 35:1 
hearing on programs, 40:3, 41:14, 42:12, 43:2, 
49:7 

Democratic victory presages probes, 45:1, 61:3 
committee composition, 45:16 
DuMONT NETWORK (see also DuMont, under 
MANUFACTURERS) 
buys KCTY, Kansas City, 1:3 
Tele-Centre, 24:6 
sale rumored, 46:1, 47:16 
Bergmann analyzes magazine concept, 48:8 
considers Guild-Vitapix, 48:14 
sells WDTV, Pittsburgh, 49:1, 50:9 
EDUCATIONAL TV 

WOR-TV tower offered educators, 3:14 
Gov. Dewey proposes non-profit setup, 6:11, 13:6 
Dr. Eisenhower’s outlook, 8:4 
New Brunswick CP dropped, 16:5 
6 stations dedicated, 20:8 

Hancock funds for Los Angeles in doubt, 24:12, 
26:16, 32:6 

Comr. Lee skeptical, 25:20 
Regents charter N. Y. City group. 26:16 
progress to date, 28:9, 40:12, 41:12 
Louisiana funds, 29:12 
Oklahoma funds, 29:12 

NARTB referendum on tax-supported stations, 
:10:14, 33:6 

Emerson $10,000 gifts, 32:11 
CBS programs, 33:8 

efforts to save KTHE, Los Angeles, 43:14 
Wis. voters deny state funds for TV, 45:16 
some programs “too entertaining.” educator says. 
47:7 

ELECTRONICS, General, Non-TV 

‘Tele-Tech’ estimates size in 1953, 1 :15 
atomic battery. 5:16, 6:11, 14:11 
FCC rejects “Manufacturers Radio Service.” 
6:11 

Sprague sees $5 billion year, 8:11 

’"Tinkertoy,” 12:11, 50:13 

automatic production symposium. 12:12 

Stanford Research predicts growth, 14:11 

Govt.-industry meetings, 15:13 

New England. 16:11 

solar batteries, 18:11, 27:12, 47:16 

military demands in all-out war estimated. 19:13 

diversification into electronics, 20:1 

Halligan forecasts new uses, 20:13 

RCA microscope most powerful, 20:13 

Global Communications Symposium, 20:13 

thermometer, 20:13 

Sperry guided missile, 20:13 

physiological monitor, 23:12 

IBM computer, 23:12 

Wurlitzer electronic piano, 23:13 

Small Business Adm. loans. 30:11 

inventions needed for defense, 33:13 



2 



electronic organ, 33:13 
industrial microwave, 34:13, 41:5 
Admiral airborne transceiver, 34:13 
National Electronics Conference, 35:13 
Sperry 4-megawatt klystron, 35:13 
Bureau of Standards lab dedicated, 38:15 
Willys selling electronic div., 38:15 
Los Angeles employment, 38:15 
ultrasonic "somascope,” 38:15 
Conelrad plan for various services, 39:6 
radar warning systems, 40:11 
Mt. Palomar telescope, 41:12 
Sarnoff reports on light amplifier, 43:6, 52:9 
big future seen in office work, 43:13 
Bureau of Standards frequency standard, 43:13 
RCA’s George Brown experiments with elec- 
tronics in biology, 44:12 

Presidential communications policy committee, 
45 :9 

vhf -activated airport lights, 47 :15 
new Raytheon radarange, 48:13 
Lear predicts artificial satellite, 48:13 
industry dollar volume, 51 :14, 52 :9 
wrist radio, 52:9 

radio-controlled traffic lights, 52:10 
EQUIPMENT, TELECASTING 
Antennas 

plane crashes, 4:8, 12:14, 19:7 
accidents, 5:8, 13:9, 20:8, 29:7, 34:8, 36:14 
40:12 

lighting and marking, 5:8, 10:6, 17:11, 23:8, 
35:14 

WFAA-TV & KRLD-TV “candelabra,” 14:3 
tall towers, 15:14, 16:5, 26:16, 27:1, 28:8, 36:14, 
37:1, 42:2, 43:6, 48:2, 49:12, 50:6, 51:2 
multiple station towers, 14:3, 22:8 
GE vhf helical, 29:7 
directional, 33:4, 36:8, 49:7 
NARTB tower insurance, 36:14 
Empire State Bldg. 15-year contract, 44:6 
high Hawaiian satellite, 50 :6 
Cameras 
Multicon, 3:8 

Thompson buys Dage, 13:13 
GE to make camera tubes, 14:13 
new British Marconi camera, 20:7 
“3-D” development, 44:6 

Transmitters (see also UHF) 
remote control foreseen, 22:8 
GE 100-kw, 46:8 
GE 50-kw high-band vhf, 47 :10 
Miscellaneous 

DuMont asks better depreciation, 4 :8 
tri-dimensional, 26:14 
RCA long-lived TV tube, 28:13 
coast-to-coast reception, 30:14 
GE noise-free studio light bulbs, 47:10 
Fleetwood Corp. enters field, 49:12 
“Yox box” laugh device, 51:8 
spiral scanning, 52:7 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
(FCC) 

ownership reports abolished, 3:14 
Lee confirmation, 3:5, 4:6, 5:10 
new attorneys & engineers, 4:7, 10:5, 20:6 
budget, 4:14, 21:16, 25:20 
Bartley deplores "traffic cop” concept, 5:9 
license fees, 5:16, 7:14, 10:12, 11:14, 12:14, 13:1, 
14:14 

Mary Jane Morris named secretary, 6:4 
lawyers shifted to decision section, 10:3 
meeting with Congress, 10 :4 
FCC counsel charged with bias, 11:6 
Edward Lamb case, 11:16, 13:16, 15:14, 19:5, 
20:16, 22:16, 23:5, 24:5, 25:14, 26:6, 28:5, 29:12, 
30:14, 31:14, 32:6, 33:7, 36:6, 36:14, 37:12, 38:6, 
39:10, 40:5, 41:6, 42:5, 44:6, 45:16, 46:14, 47:6, 
51:9 

Hyde named acting chairman, 17:16 
Starbuck of old FRC dies, 19:5 
Sterling gets 30-year pin, 19 :6 
Lee speeches, 19:6, 39:1(), 46:14 
“territorial exclusivity” proposal, 14:3, 19:14. 
20:16 

20th anniversary, 20:16 
Plummer discusses spectrum utilization, 22:8 
Doerfer reappointed, 23:1, 25:6, 27:14 
anti-communist proposal on amateurs, operators. 
24:12, 30:14 

lawyer resignations, 26:7 
NARTB urges naming of chairman, 37:12 
Sterling resigns, 38:7 
candidates for membership, 38:7 
McConnaughey named chairman, 39:1, 40:2, 41:4 
Navy counsel attacks “influence,” 39:14 
J. Edgar Hoover reports red in station, 40:5 
cease & desist conviction, 40:10 
memo on employes’ personal conduct, 41:4 
McConnaughey speeches, 44:6 
“conflict of interest” charge against McCon- 
naughey, 44:6 

confirmation of McConnaughey blocked, 46:3. 
47:16 

Lee discusses industry “czar,” 46:14 
replacement for Hennock considered, 49:8 
turns down WFCC call letters request, 49:12 
Cowgill common carrier chief, 50:4 
Cunningham named chief examiner, 50:4 
"overcommercialization” questioned, 50:8 
Senate committee seeks station income figures, 
52 :1 

FILM, TV— See Movies & TV Films 
FI.\A.NCIAL ACTIVITY, GENERAL 
Manufacturing 
value of 1953 output, 4:10 



Television-Electronics Fund Inc., 6:10, 9:11, 

15:12, 22:14, 32:13, 33:14, 46:13 
‘N. Y. 'Times’ survey of 586 companies, 25:19 
total stockholders per company, 28:13 
NCO survey of 18 manufacturers, 31:13 
observers at RCA color demonstration, 38:16 
per-share earnings of 12 companies, 38:16 
favored companies of trusts, etc., 39:14 
Bache list of companies favored for capital gain, 
50:13 

Telecasting (see also Advertising) 

FCC report on post-freeze stations, 1:6, 21:2 
Storer stock purchase, 3:13 
‘Printers’ Ink’ summary of 1953, 4:6 
WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids, 9:4 
KMPT, Oklahoma City, receivership, 9:6 
Doherty’s analysis, 11:3 

Storer financial reports, 11:13, 17:12, 33:14, 

47:15, 50:13 

WJPB-TV, Fairmont, W. Va., 12:1 
KETX, Tyler, Tex., off and on air, 14:2, 15:6 
FCC report on 1953, 21:1, 24:4, 43:6 
’Sponsor’ report On pre-freeze stations, 21:10 
pre-freeze stations testify on losses, 26:8 
KMJ-TV, Fresno, 27:7 
KGUL-TV, Galveston, 27 :13 
recapitulation of stations off air, 28:1 
WNBF-TV, Binghamton, 28:14 
WTSK, Knoxville, 29:12 
WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre, 31:14 
Kansas City low-cost proposal, 32:8 
KBMT, Beaumont. 33:9 
WNEM-TV, Bay City. 33:16 
classes of station ownership, 35 :4 
Storer borrows $12,000,000, 36:8 
CBS network -station income, 37:6 
half billion invested in stations, 41 :4 
Meredith Pub. financial reports, 43 :12 
industry nears billion annually, 48:1 
revenues-per-set, 48:7 
Bitner public stock sale, 48:10 
KTVQ, Oklahoma City, Chapter X reorganiza- 
tion, 52 :6 

KOMO-TV, Seattle, separates TV & AM, 52:6 
Stations Off Air 
KCTY, Kansas City, Mo., 7:2 
WIFE, Dayton, 0., 11:1 
KRTV, Little Rock, Ark., 11 :1 
WOSH-TV, Oshkosh, Wis., 12:1 
WACH, Newport News, Va., 14:2, 31:3 
KACY, Festus, Mo., 16:6, 39:9 
WKLO-TV, Louisville, Ky., 17:4 
WBKZ-TV, Battle Creek, Mich., 17:4 
XELD-TV, Matamoros, Mex., 18:4 
CMTV, Havana, Cuba, 18:4, 22:10, 36:9 
WFPG-TV, Atlantic City, N. J., 19:2 
WTAC-TV, Flint, Mich., 19:2 
KFAZ, Monroe, La., 19:2 
KDZA-TV, Pueblo, Colo., 20:3 
WECT, Elmira, N. Y., 22:3 
WKJF-TV, Pittsburgh, Pa., 26:3 
KNUZ-TV, Houston, Tex., 27:3 
WFTV, Duluth, Minn., 28:4 
WRAY-TV, Princeton, Ind., 28:4 
KBID-TV, Fresno, Cal., 29:3 
WCHA-TV, Chambersburg, Pa., 29:3 
WKAB-TV, Mobile, Ala., 31:3 
WCOC-TV, Meridian, Miss., 31:3 
KSTM-TV, St. Louis, Mo., 32:4 
KTHE, Los Angeles, Cal., 37 :3 
KOPR-TV, Butte, Mont., 38:2 
WTOV-TV, Norfolk, Va., 40:4 
KETX. Tyler. Tex., 43:3 
WPFA-TV, Pensacola, Fla., 45:3, 60:3 
WTVE, Elmira, N. Y., 45:3 
KCEB, Tulsa, Okla., 49:6 
WNAM-TV, Neenah, Wis., 49:6 
WPMT, Portland, Ore., 62:2 

FINANCIAL REPORTS — see individual manu- 
facturers and networks 

FOREIGN TV 
Italy, 3:8, 12:13 
Philips universal set, 3:8 
Morocco, 7:10 
Denmark, 9:10, 39:15 
South America, 12:3, 18:7 
Russia, 13:15, 28:12, 52:7 
France, 13:15 
Japan, 17:11, 27:11 
Germany, 19:10, 23:10, 35:12, 45:13 
Colombia, 19:10, 25:18, 45:11, 61:13 
Australia. 20:16, 44:5, 46:11, 49:16 
“Eurovision,” 23:14, 39:8 
Philippines, 28:14, 33:16 
world roundup, 30:5 

international possibilities, 30:14, 31:10, 34:7 
Voice of America, 33:7, 47:9, 48:14 
Philips of Eindhoven financial report, 35:13 
Austria, 39:15 
India, 39:15 

Central American Bcstrs. Assn., 41:13 
DuMont’s Marx reports on Europe, 44:6 
Iraq, 47:9 

Y&R’s Erickson urges close watch on overseas 
TV, 48:10 
Guatemala, 50:6 
Luxembourg, 50:14 
Paramount’s foreign interests, 50:9 
Britain 

license fee increase, 10:8 

l■^lrnmercial TV, 11:13, 13:6, 32:7, 38:8, 60:14 

Sir Ian Jacobs says color 2 years away, 23:11 

Pye Ltd. financial report, 36:13 

transmitter sales, 39:8 

BBC 10-year plan, 42:6 

roundup after tour, 45:4 



Sir George Barnes studying U. S. color, 46:11. 
48:13 

“bootlegged” sets, 47:7 
spurious radiation problems, 47:14 
theatre TV, 47:16 

fourth program contractor selected, 48:10 
TV called “Enemy No. 1,” 50:14 
Canada 

govt. TV-radio appropriations, 7:14 
private stations authorized, 26:10, 35:8 
east-west link, 30:11 
set sales, 39:12, 47:14 

channel changes attacked by ‘Toronto Telegram.’ 
44:7 



Cuba 

airplane relay for Series, 40:12 
Santa Clara-Camaguey microwave, 42:12 
AT&T plans Florida-Cuba microwave, 39:16. 
45:9, 49:12, 51:16 



Mexico 

raises import duties on sets, 1 :14 
XELD-TV, Matamoros, 5:16, 6:12 
new CPs, 31:13 

Azcarraga-O’Farrill merger, 49:10 






functional music decision, 1:10, 8:6, 

Britain chooses FM, 4:14 

Maj. Armstrong dies, 6:12 

KE2XCC closed down, 10:6 

revitalization seen by Comr. Sterling, 22:16 

WABF, New York, sold, 25:20 

auto set, 47:14 



V*,, aiou our- 

veys) 

Catholic “TV office” in Rome, 1:7 
Methodist fund-raising for TV programs, 1 ;7 
helps piano sales, 7:12 

Yale Divinity School survey of parents, 17:11 

implosion of tube in Cleveland, 17:16 

TV-phone predicted by Bell’s Bown, 19:13 

clothing sales affected, 20:8 

TV uses 10% of home electricity, 23:8 

Sarnoff discusses TV and law enforcement, 24:12 

NAFBRAT survey re children, 29:6 

music industry flourishes, 30:11 

British preference for 17-in., 30:11 

Germans prefer TVs to bathrooms, 30:11 

Northwestern U survey on viewing habits, 30 '14 

“TV slump” and “TV squat,” 30:14 

TV photography, 30:14 

clergyman urges use, 32:5, 39:9 

Sen. Hendrickson polls TV-radio editors, 32:14 

decline in bus travel, 33:10 

skywriting hurt, 35:14 

Garry Moore “nickel appeal,” 38:6 

“ghost of grandfather,” 38:11 

''^*3^'^^ while watching wrestling, 

TV-radio barred from murder trial, 41:14 
President calls veteran after seeing program, 
41:14 

individual sets for restaurant booths, 42 ’12 
court trial televised, 49:11 
NARTB study of juvenile delinquency, 51 *9 
INDUSTRIAL TV 

RCA “TV-Eye,” 1:15, 9:10, 31:13, 42:10 
closed-circuit at horse races, 3:12 
blood-cell counter, 3 :12 
police lineup, 8:11 
self-propelled undersea camera, 11:12 
at IRE convention, 13:13, 14:11 
hospitals with CBS closed-circuit color, 18 '10 
new Diamond Power camera, 22:15 
GE offering CBS color equipment, 24:11 
TV intercom, 34:13 
Philco plans production, 35:13 
Marconi vidicon, 35:13 
GPL vidicon, 41:12 
camera in turnpike tunnel, 47:16 
INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) 
major awards, 41:12 
officers and fellows, 46:12 
LABOR — see Unions 



Farr’s survey of 400 dealers, 3:10 

RCA’s Elliott suggests sales techniques, 3:11 

St. Louis BBB asks ad improvement, 3:11 

NARDA officers, 3:13 

NARDA Blue Book, 6:10 

color offered by N. Y. dept stores, 7:11 

retail failures per Dun & Bradstreet, 8:9 

markets indicated by new CPs, 9:3 

National Assn, of Discount Merchants, 9:10 

FTC hearings and proposals, 23:10, 24:10, 26:12, 

banker warns dealers to improve practices, 24:10 
TV leads appliance sales of NARDA members, 
25:18 



FTC drops Sylvania tube case, 25:18 
NAED officers, 25:18 
percentages of dept, store sales, 28:12 
NAMM officers, 30:10 

discount houses, 31:12, 32:10, 34:12, 35:12. 37 '10 
44:11, 46:14 

BBB tests miniature antennas, 33:12 
NARDA accounting system, 33:12 
problems of selling color, 35:10 
FTC ad allowance ruling, 35:12 
preferred brands, 37 :10 
survey of second-set market, 37:11 
marts, 38:13. 40:9 

Johnston, NARDA, asks understanding of mfrs 
42:10 

NEDA officers, 43:12 

W. T. Grant tries set sales, 46:11 



s 



25:19 



29:6 



42:6 



RETMA dealer census, 47:14 
GE discontinues factory -fixed prices, 48:12 
drop summer markets, NARDA urges, 50:12 
“Videotown” survey of buying habits, 50:14 
putting low-cost sets into custom cabinets, 52:10 

MILITARY PROCUREMENT — see Mobilization 

MILITARY, USE OF TV BY 
Navy training unit, 19:13 

Army tactical unit, 19:13 0 ,. 1 ,- 

stations at isolated bases, 19:14, 20:16, 21.16, 
23:14, 26:13, 27:4, 44:8 
recruiting via TV, 28:6, 33:7 
combat use, 33:1 
color at Ft. Huachuca, 50:13 

MOBILIZATION 

electronics in budget, 4:13 

Signal Corps posts realigned, 28:13 

House committee attacks untested set, 30:13 

MONOPOLY — see Anti-Trust 

MOVIES & TV FILMS „ oo.,. 

theatre ownership of TV stations, 2 :5, 29 .6 
NARTB survey of film use, 3:14 
■Variety’ predicts $40,000,000 in TV films this 
year, 3:14 

Academy Awards telecast, 6:5 

Hughes buys RKO, 13:8, 18:7 

SMPTE convention, 15:7 

MPTV plan for film sales, 16:7, 25:12 

bankers’ view of TV film, 23:6, 25:12, 51:8 

Autry & Rogers movies due for release, 24.6, 

COMPO planning TV plugs, 24 16 
Telenews buys Industrial Pub. Co 
Ziv signs Eddie Cantor, 26:9 
stars’ income from TV film, 27.6 
Goldwyn predicts movie-TV joining 
GPL 745-line system for films, 29:12 
Clipp’s film-rate proposal, 30:7 
networks planning film produ^ion, 31 :7 
Rembusch proposes Sl-000.000 TV plug, 33 .6 
Weaver deprecates “senile celluloids, 34.4, 35.6 

TV film booms Hollywood, 34:6 
Advertest survey of film repeats, 35:6 
union boycott of film made in Engl^and, 35 .9 
movie industry financial upturn, 37 Id, 4oIo 
Guild Film stock offer, 37 :8 
confusion over number of re-runs, 38.9 
WTOM-TV plans for film, 41:6 
General Teleradio cites rating, 41:8, 45:9 
TV and feature film to be shot in Australia 
Vitapix-Guild agreement, 44:8, 45:8, 62:6 
“Foreign Intrigue” to be made feature, 46 :9 
J. Arthur Rank financial report, 45:15 
TOA officers, 45:15 
‘Tide’ on 1955 trends, 47:9 
TV-movie affinities, 47:9, 49:11 
Ziv expansion into Europe, 47 :9 
satire on TV planned, 4’7:16 
DuMont “Tel-Eye” for film making, 48.5 
efforts to buy RKO backlog, 48:8, 49:11 
Disney urges TV for movie promotion, 49.10 
Zanuck likes TV techniques, 49:10 
MCA -TV takes over UTP, 50:8, 62:6 
Republic features to TV, 50:8 
Paramount’s TV interests, 50:9 
music editors going to TV, 51:8 
Disney financial reports, 51:15 
Warner Bros, financial reporte, 51:15 
Twentieth Century-Fox financial reports, 6i:ib 
TV Inc. formed for film buying, 52:6 
movies selling premieres to sponsors, 52 :6 
suit on unauthorized TV showing, 52 :6 

MUSIC AGENCIES 
ASCAP, 35:9, 45:11 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM (MBS) 
billings, 2:7 

says business best yet, 11:7 
sale of network denied, 16:6 
20th anniversary, 39 :6 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF RADIO & TELE- 
VISION BROADCASTERS (NARTB) 
code, 4:12, 5:7, 14:7, 49:10, 50:14 
set census, 4:14, 20:16, 30:14 
program logs, 7:14 , , ,, ,, 

conventions, 14:12, 20:6, 22.1, 41.14 
TV ad bureau, 17:1, 18:12, 20:16, 22:6, 24 j7, 26.1, 
27:2, 28:6, 31:7, 32:7, 35:7, 36:7, 39:6, 46:8, 
48:14, 49:16, 51:16, 52:5 
Meagher radio v.p., 20:6 
Richards resigns, 22 :6 

tower insurance, 36:14 oa.io 

petitions FCC on TV station identification, 3'7. 13 
Voice of Democracy contest, 38:11, 42:12, 45:8 
criticism of too many district meetings, 39 :6 
Justin Miller Fund at USC, 42:4 
beer & wine questionnaire, 42:12, 46:6 
study of juvenile delinquency, 51:9 
NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. (NBC) 
spot sales 1953 billings, 1:9 
“Today” billings, 3:6, 49:9 
“Home” program. 4:8, 49:9 
all night AM operations, 4:9 
NBC Enterprises, 9:12 
takes over “March of Time” library, 16:5 
spot sales arrangement with CrosI^. 17:8 
souvenir shop exploiting personalities, 17.11 
“Voice of Firestone” dropped, 20:7 
new rates for production & service, 25:14 
Sarnoff on editorials, 36:5 
attitude on radio network future, 36:6 
plan for optional affiliates, 36:8 
"RCA” call letters, 36:14, 40:4 
“magazine” program billings, 40:12, 49:9 
new optional ID, 42:12 



’New Yorker’ profile on Weaver, 45:7 

turns down McCarthy request for time, 48:14, 

affiliation changes, 60:1 

NETWORKS, Coaxial-Microwave Facilities 

private links, 3:4, 20:8, 29:7, 33:7, 36:14, 38.9, 
39:16, 46:3, 51:4, 52:4 
round robin, 5:8, 31:14 
AT&T rates attacked by ABC. 25:14 
color rates and routes, 33:15 
“package” rate, 35:7 

plans for U. S-Cuba interconnection, 39:16, 45:9, 
49:12, 61:16 

new A'T&T antenna design, 44:12 
Miami-W. Palm Beach L-3 link, 45:16 
A'T&T considers low-cost service, 61:4 

NEW STATIONS ON AIR (see Financial, Tele- 
casting, for stations leaving air) 

WFBC-TV, Greenville. S. C., 1:3 
KHOL-TV, Kearney, Neb., 1:3 
WCOC-TV, Meridian, Miss., 1:3 
WBTM-TV. Danville, Va., 2:4 
WEAR-TV, Pensacola, Fla., 3:3 
WKAR-TV, E. Lansing. Mich., 3:3 
WARM-TV, Scranton, Pa., 5:2 
KCEB, Tulsa. Okla., 6:3 
WTOC-TV, Savannah, Ga., 6:3 
WKAQ-TV. San Juan, P. R.. 7:2 
WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich., 7:2 
WRDW-TV. Augusta. Ga.. 7:2 
KBID-TV, Frenso, Cal., 7:3 
WMGT, Adams, Mass., 7 :3 
WDSM-TV, Duluth. Minn., 9:2 
KDAL-TV, Duluth, Minn., 9:2 
WTRI, Albany, N. Y„ 9:2 
KFBC-TV, Cheyenne, Wyo., 10:2 
KSAN-TV, San Francisco. Cal., 10:2 
WMUR-TV, Manchester, N. H., 11:5 
WINK-TV, Ft. Myers, Fla., 11:5 
WAPA-TV, San Juan, P. R., 11:5 
WQED, Pittsburgh, Pa., 12:1 
KFBB-TV, Great Falls, Mont., 12:2 
WJPB-TV, Fairmont. W. Va., 12:2 
WSJV, Elkhart, Ind., 12:2 
WSLI-TV, Jackson, Miss., 12:2 
K.\RK-TV, Little Rock. Ark., 13:4 
WNET, Providence, R. I., 13:4 
KVAL-TV, Eugene, Ore., 13:4 
WHA-TV, Madison, Wis., 13:5 
CHSJ-TV, St, John, N. B., 13:6 
KULA-TV, Honolulu. T. H., 15:2 
WMFD-TV. Wilmington, N. C„ 16:2 
KQED, San Francisco, Clal., 15:2 
WALB-TV, Albany, Ga.. 16:2 
KBMT, Beaumont, Tex., 15:2 
WHO-’TV, Des Moines, la.. 16:3 
WDEF-TV. Chattanooga, Tenn., 16:4 
KRGV-TV. Weslaco, Tex., 16:4 
WGAN-TV, Portland, Me., 17:2 
WKNY-TV, Kingston, N. Y„ 17:2 
WSEE, Erie, Pa., 17:3 
XEJ-TV, Juarez, Mex., 17 :3 
KTEN, Ada, Okla., 18:4 
KGLO-TV, Mason City. la., 19:1 
KFXJ-TV, Grand Junction, Colo., 22:3 
CBWT, Winnipeg. Man., 22:3 
WBOC-TV, Salisbury, Md., 23:3 
CHCH-TV, Hamilton. Ont., 23:3 
WDBO-TV. Orlando. Fla., 24:1 
KVDO-TV, Corpus Christi, Tex., 24:1 
WISH-TV, Indianapolis, Ind., 26:2 
WKBT, La Crosse. Wis., 26:2 
KDRO-TV, Sedalia, Mo., 26:3 
WMSL-TV, Decatur, Ala., 27:3 
KGVO-TV, Missoula, Mont., 27:3 
WCET, Cincinnati, 0., 27:3 
KWK-TV, St. Louis. Mo., 28:3 
WLAC-TV, Nashville, Tenn., 28:3 
KGEO-TV, Enid, Okla., 28:4 
KXJB-TV, Valley City, N. D., 29:2 
CFCM-TV, Quebec City, Que., 29:2 
WTHI-TV, Terre Haute. Ind., 30:1 
WGR-TV, Buffalo, N. Y„ 31:3 
WPBN-TV, Traverse City, Mich., 31:3 
CKCK-TV. Regina, Sask., 31:4 
WGTH-TV, Hartford, Conn., 32:4 
WTVD, Durham, N. C.. 33:3 
WMBV-TV, Marinette. Wis., 33:3 
WJNO-TV. Palm Beach. Fla., 34:3 
WCHS-TV, Charleston, W. Va., 34:3 
WMTW, Poland, Me., 36;2 
WMVT, Montpelier, Vt.. 36:3 
KOVR, Stockton, Cal., 36:3 
WCMB-TV, Harrisburg, Pa., 36:3 
KSWM-TV, Joplin, Mo.. 36:3 
CKLW-TV, Windsor. Ont., 36:3 
WUSN-TV, Charleston, S. C.. 37:3 
WINT, Waterloo-Ft. Wayne, Ind., 37:3 
WTWO, Bangor, Me., 37:3 
KTVX, Muskogee, Okla., 38:2 
KUTV, Salt Lake City, Utah, 38:2 
WLOS-TV, Asheville, N. C., 38:3 
KETC, St. Louis, Mo., 38:3 
CFP.A.-TV, Port Arthur, Ont., 38:3 
KTIV, Sioux City, la.. 31:2 
KALB-TV, Alexandria. La.. 39:3 
KPLC-TV. Lake Charles. La., 39:3 
KFVS-TV, Cape Girardeau. Mo.. 40:4 
CFRN-TV, Edmonton, Alta., 40:4 
WBTW. Florence, S. C., 41:2 
CJCB-TV. Sydney, N. S.. 41:3 
CHCT-TV. Calgary, Alta., 41:3 
KAKE-TV. Wichita, Kan., 42:4 
KLTV, Tyler, Tex., 42:4 
WCNY-TV. Carthage, N. Y.. 43:3 
WTVW, Milwaukee. Wis., 44:2 
KKEM-TV. Spokane, Wash., 44:2 
WSAU-TV, Wausau, Wis., 44:2 



WQXI-TV, Atlanta, Ga., 44:3 
WSFA-TV, Montgomery. Ala., 45:3 
KUON-TV, Lincoln, Neb., 45:3 
KVOO-TV, Tulsa, Okla., 46:2 
KCKT, Great Bend, Kan., 46:3 
KTRK-TV. Houston, Tex., 47:3 
KCTS, Seattle, Wash., 47:4 
CKWS-TV, Kingston, Ont., 47:4 
CJIC-TV, Sault Ste. Marie. Ont., 47:4 
WFMZ-TV, Allentown, Pa., 48:4 
WEDM, Munford, Ala., 48:4 
CJBR-'TV, Rimouski, Que., 48:5 
WIRL Plattsburg, N. Y., 49:6 
CKCW-TV, Moncton, N. B., 49:6 
WOAY-TV, Oak Hill, W. Va., 60:3 
CFQC-TV, Saskatoon, Sask., 60:3 
WEAT-TV, W. Palm Beach, Fla., 52:2 
WUNC-TV, Chapel Hill. N. C.. 52:3 
CBHT-TV, Halifax, N. S.. 52:3 

NEWSPAPERS, TV’s IMPACT ON (see also Sur- 
veys) 

ownership of TV stations, 2:5, 29:3 

c’narge for logs, 4:5 

growth in 1953, 11:7 

urge to improve vs. TV, 17 :15 

Johnson bill to restrict TV ownership. 18:12 

TV not “big bad wolf,” says John Herbert, 44:5 

don’t blame TV for all losses, papers told, 47 :7 

ANPA joins court appeal against FCC, 51:3 

PATENTS (see also Anti-Trust) 
court rules on RCA sublicensing, 3:12 
Armstrong suit, 3:12 

RCA-Zenith suit, 8:9, 10:10, 21:14, 25:19, 27:7, 
31:12, 33:12, 42:11, 49:13, 50:8, 51:15 
RCA-GE agreement, 13:15 
extensions being signed, RCA reports, 19:11 
‘Retailing Daily’ series, 20:12, 21:14 
RCA royalty cuts, 30:11 
color tubes, 44 :9 
IT&T-GE agreements, 46:12 
Philco agreements, 46:12 
Govt, suit against RCA, 47:1, 48:14 
FCC proposal on disclosures, 50 :3 
RCA-CBS color tube agreement, 51:10 

POLITICS 

McCarthy refused network time, 11:6 
Murrow’s “See It Now,” 11:5, 15:1, 16:7 
Pres. Eisenhower’s technique, 15:8 
Democrats consider closed-circuit rally, 20:8 
FCC amends political broadcasting rules, 26:9, 
31:7 37:12 

politicos in TV, 28:6 

survey of TV effects on 1952 campaign, 29:12 
GOP film “Report to the People,” 33:16 
TV-radio in campaigns, 37:7 
Doerfer criticizes equal-time law, 38:7 
Communist right to broadcast, 39:9 
Democrat TV handbook, 39:16 
GOP film for congressmen, 40:12 
Bartley speech, 41:14 
“hell” heard on Nixon program, 42:4 
TV-radio effect on McCarthy discussed by Vade- 
boncoeur, 43:6 
Cabinet telecast, 44 :7 

FCC rules on station-candidate disputes, 44:7 
equal time on “Strike it Rich,” 44:7 
President confuses Folsom with Stanton, 44 :7 
TV-radio handling of election returns, 44:14 

PREDICTIONS 

Television Digest,’ telecasting volume in 1964, 
1:4, 23:1 

industry leaders, 1954 sets sales, 1:11, 28:10 
RC.A’s Sacks, phonograph business, 3:10 
Admiral’s Barreca, Canadian TV market, 3:10 
Sylvania’s Mansfield, injlustry generally, 5:13 
CBS’s Stanton, stations and income, 14:5 
Stanford Research, electronics growth, 14:11 
Admiral’s Johnson, set sales in 3 years, 16:10 
Westinghouse’s Campbell, Canadian market, 19:9 
GE’s O’Brien, TV & color in 1964, 23:11 
DuMont, TV advertising in 1958, 26:15 
Admiral’s Siragusa, sales for 3 years, 29:9 
color set production, 30:13 

NBC’s Robert Sarnoff, telecasting volume, 34:14 

RCA’s Folsom, electronics volume by 1967, 39:11 

Motorola’s Paul Galvin, industry, 42:9 

RETMA, 1965 set production, 47 :14 

Odorizzi, set servicing, 48:11 

RCA’s Sarnoff. electric power consumption, 48 :12 

industry leaders, 1955 production, 61:13, 52:10 

PROFITS, TV STATIONS — see Financial Activity 



PROGRAMS AND PRODUCTION 

WACH-TV “continuous performance. 1:9 
commentator gets $10,000 in “red” charge. 2:6 
gratuity racket, 2:14 . „ , , 

Hearst Metrotone buys Telenews service, 2:14 
“laugh tracks” deplored by critic, 4:8 
NBC “Home” 4:8, 9:8 

Bernays survey of commercials, 5:1. 7:9. 15:9 
giveaways, 6:5, 15:4, 22:9, 42:6, 48:14, 52.12 
Teleprompter, 7:9, 15:2, 35:13 
Billy Rose sponsors play critics, 8:6 
“stereophonic TV” test, 9:11 
“Strike it Rich,” 10:12 _ 

McCarthy-Murrow exchange, 15:1, 16 :i, 21:10 
MPTV plan for film sales. 16:7 „ - - 

Army-McCarthy hearings, 16:7, 17:16, 18 :i, 19 :o, 
20:7, 21:10. 22:9. 25:12 

Robert Sherwood says TV helping theatre, 1 1 .9 
Paley’s speech on news responsibility. 22:1 
“Facts Forum,” 23:5 

Curtis planning program magazine. 31:6. 36 :b 
Wrather buys “Lone Ranger,” 32:8 
trend to live programs, 32:14 



4 



3oap opera audience, 33:8 
Robert Sherwood plays, 34:6 

Theatre Guild plans plays from TV dramas, 34 :6 

INS photo-tape service, 34:14 

WOR-TV feature film repeats, 37:7 

Hollywood network originations increase, 39:9 

TV writers to Hollywood, 42:6 

model libel relief law, 42:6 

investment broker suit against WTVJ, 43:8 

light jubilee show, 44:5, 45:9 

Gould cites effect of press criticism, 44:14 

fall top 10 rating, 46:6 

discrimination against Negro performers charged, 
48:9 

court trial televised, 49:11 
CBS’s Robinson writes in ‘Esquire,’ 50:14 
Gleason $11,000,000 contract, 52:6 
talent control attacked by ‘Advertising Age,’ 52 :6 
end of talent-raiding sought, 52:6 
Awards 

‘Radio-TV Daily,’ 3 :7 
Christopher, 4:14 
Emmy, 7:14 
Lee deForest, 12:7 
Alfred I. duPont, 13:16 
George Polk, 15 :8 
Ohio State U, 15:14 
Peabody, 16:5 
‘TV Guide,’ 16:5 
Sigma Delta Chi, 16:5 
Headliners, 22:9 
Freedom, 28:13 
Saturday Review,’ 31:10 
‘Billboard,’ 31:10 
Golden Mike, 37:6 
Christophers, 47 :7 
Sylvania, 49:11 
‘Look,’ 60:7 
McCall’s,’ 52:6 

RADIO-ELECTRONICS-TELEVISION MFRS. 
ASSN. IRETMA) 

plan for spurious radiation, 14:9, 34:9 

Sprague named for Medal of Honor, 18:9 

officers, 26:16, 26:13 

manufacturers’ failures, 25:16 

Voice of Democracy contest, 38:11, 42:12, 46:8 

gets trade assn, award for NTSC work, 46 :13 

automation committee, 51:14 

RECEIVER INSTALLATION & SERVICING 
color sets, 6:7, 7:10, 8:7, 9:7 
Mary Pickford’s magnifier, 11:11 
servicing called key factor,” 36:12 
N. Y. probe of racketeering, 43:11, 48:12, 49:16 
"Dragnet” featuring expose, 44:11 
volume predicted by RCA’s Ordorizzi, 48:11 
electric power consumption $460,000,000, 48:12 

RECEIVER PRODUCTION (see also individual 
manufacturers) 

1953 output, 2:9, 4:10 
Mansfield’s analysis of industry, 5:13 
medium-sized set makers’ approach, 6:8 
compared with auto output, 6:10, 19:10 
"Tinkertoy” TV Set, 6:11 

radiation and IF, 8:9, 9:9, 14:9, 16:1, 34:9, 38:14, 
:19:12, 42:10 

printed-circuit sets, 13:11, 26:18 
Sen. Douglas cites unemployment, 13:11 
private labels and price cuts, 15:11 
plant vacations, 17:16, 26:12 
Preview group indicted in $2,000,000 swindle, 
18:10 

RCA series-string tubes, 21:14, 30:11, 41:11 

surveys of set makes sold, 22:13, 25:18 

plastic cabinets, 24:10 

‘TV-radio” suggested BV Gould, 27 :11 

phosphor consumption, 28:18 

average factory value, 30:9, 46:10 

GE engineer envisages thin screen, 34:13 

automation, 34:13 

govt, business census, 36:12 

Benrus plans radio production, 36:12 

Sarnoff predictions, 36:13 

radio market improves, 38:12 

Greenebaum’s production estimates, 39:12 

ARB survey of sales, second sets, etc., 41:1 

masonite & chipboard cabinets, 41:11 

phonograph ownership, 45:13 

NEMA officers, 46:11 

components makers highly competitive, 47 :13 
1965 production estimates, 47:14 
inventory buildup, 49:14, 60:11 
’’Videotown” survey of buying habits, 60:14 
light amplifier, 62:9 

RECORDS & RECORDINGS — see Tape Recordings 

REPRESENTATIVES, TV STATIONS 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, 2:7, 12:7 
Hoag-Blair Co., 33:6 
H. Quenton Cox & Assoc.. 47 :8 
John L. McGuire. 61:7 
SRA officers, 52:5 

SALES, TV STATIONS (sec AM Broadcasting 
for radio sales) 

KCTY, Kansas City, Mo., 1 :3 
Strjrer buys Empire Coil, 2:3, 44:3 
KXLY-TV, Spokane, Wash., 2:14 
WHBQ-TV, Memphis, Tenn., 5:3, 11:14, 27:14 
KMO-'TV, Tacoma. Wash., 5:3, 21:16, 28:14, 
38:16 

KFAZ, Monroe. La., 6:12 
summaries, 9:6, 14:13 

KLZ-TV, Denver, Colo., 10:2. 11:14, 15:14, 18:6. 
26:16 

WHYN-TV. Springfield, Mass., 10:2, 30:14 
KOTV, Tulsa, Okla., 11:14, 14:1, 20:6 
KPIX, San Francisco, Cal., 11:14, 19:14, 27:14 



KOY-TV, Phoenix, Ariz., 12:14, 19:14 
KFOR-TV, Lincoln, Neb., 13:16, 20:6 
KGBS-TV, San Antonio, Tex., 16:4, 22:16, 26:16, 
44:3 

KBAK, Bakersfield, Cal., 16:6 
KMBC-TV, Kansas City, Mo.. 17:1, 20:6, 24:12 
KTYL-TV, Phoenix. Ariz., 18:4, 26:20 
WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg, Fla., 18:6, 19:14 
WTVH-TV, Peoria, 111., 18:5 
WUTV (CP), Youngstown, O., 19:14 
WTSK-TV, Knoxville, Tenn., 23:14, 31:10 
WDAK-TV, Columbus, Ga., 24:12, 29:12 
KVVG, Tulare, Cal., 27:7, 33:16, 41:13 
KTVU, Stockton, Cal., 28:14 
KCRI-TV, Cedar Rapids, la., 29:12, 33:16 
WSIX-TV, Nashville, Tenn., 29:12, 32:14, 36:9 
KOLN-TV, Lincoln, Neb., 31:10 
KFSD-TV, San Diego, Cal., 31:14, 32:14, 34:14, 
38:16, 42:4 

KCCC-'TV, Sacramento, Cal., 34:14 
KSCJ-TV, Pueblo, Colo., 36:5, 40:6 
WLAC-TV, Nashville, Tenn., 36:9 
KTXL-TV, San Angelo, Tex., 36:9 
WILS-TV, Lansing, Mich., 36:9, 39:7 
KEYD-TV, Minneapolis, Minn., 38:16 
WCAN-TV, Milwaukee, "Wis., 38:16 
WSFA-TV, Montgomery, Ala., 38:16, 40:12, 60:6 
WAPA-TV, San Juan, P. R., 41:7 
KQXI, San Jose, Cal., 41:8, 62:12 
KMM’T, Austin, Minn., 42:4 
WTOP-TV, Washington, D. C., 42:6 
WROW-TV, Albany, N. Y., 42:12, 46:2 
WPFA-TV, Pensacola, Fla., 42:12 
WGR-TV, Buffalo, N. Y., 43:8 
WOKY-TV, Milwaukee, Wis., 43:1 
KWK-TV, St. Louis, Mo., 44:4 
WLOK-TV, Lima, 0., 44:4 
KRDO-TV, Colorado Springs. Colo., 44:4 
WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, Minn., 45:2 
KMBY-TV, Monterey, Cal., 46:3 
KFIA, Anchorage, Alaska, 46:3, 47:7 
KFIF, Fairbanks. Alaska, 45:3, 47:7 
KBAY-TV, San Francisco. Cal., 45:3 
WSTV-TV, Steubenville, 0„ 47:1 
WFTL-TV & WMIE-TV, Miami, Fla., 47:1, 61:6 
WJPB-TV, Fairmont, W. Va., 47:2, 61:9 
WTPA, Harrisburg, Pa., 47:16 
WNEM-TV, Bay City-Saginaw, Mich., 48:14, 
50:8 

KANG-TV, Waco, Tex., 48:14, 49:16 
WUSN-TV, Charleston, S. C., 48:14 
KOMO-TV, Seattle, Wash., 48:14 
WDTV, Pittsburgh, Pa., 49:1, 60:9 
WJOL-TV, Joliet, 111., 49:16 
KLFY-TV, Lafayette, La.. 49:16 
WAYS-TV, Charlotte, N. C.. 51:8 
KNAC-TV, Ft. Smith, Ark., 62 :12 
SATELLITES — see Boosters & Satellites 

SERVICING & SERVICEMEN— see Receiver In- 
stallation 

SETS-IN-USE — see Census, TV Receiver 

SMPTE — see Movies 

SPORTS 

Baseball 

minor league troubles blamed on TV, 6:11, 37:12 
majors protest "piracy” of games, 16:6, 16:6 
San Francisco Seals reports little impact, 31:13 
minors’ damage suit against majors, 39:6 
World Series, 40:7 

minors vote curb of majors’ TV, 46:16, 49:10, 
60:14 

Boxing 

anti-trust argument before Supreme Court, 46:14 
penalty for deducting TV “donations.” 48:9 
A1 Ettore privacy suit, 49:10 
IBC TV take, 61:7 
Football 

NCAA controls and schedules, 2:14, 14:14, 16:12, 
22:9, :10:8, 35:6, 60:14 
National Football League, 6:10 
Big Ten regional plan, 10:12 
ABC gets NCAA schedule, 17:16, 36:8, 49:11 
DuMont-NFL agreement, 18:6 
NBC carries Canadian pros, 20:7 
NCAA report on TV-radio impact, 25:20 
NCAA & Canadian pro telecasts flop, 45:9 
Notre Dame blasts NCAA, 46:14 

SUBSCRIBER-VISION — see Subscription TV 
SUBSCRIPTION TV 

FCC attitude, 17:9, 44:6, 49:10 
defined as "broadcasting” by FCC, 20:4 
supported by Eric Johnston, 22:9, 23:6 
Spyros Skouras bearish, 24:6 
RETMA opposes Hinshaw Bill, 26:9 
Kamen plana book, 29:6 
favored by Sen. Schoeppel, 37:6 
argument against rule-making. 37:5 
not important, says RCA’s Folsom, 40 :5 
exhibitors organize fight, 43:3, 61:16 
exhibitors wooed. 48:6 

endorsed by Equity pres. Ralph Bellamy, 60:8 
Phonevision 

Faiight speeches, 15:6, 36:9 
N. Y. tests. 16:6, 22:9 
Australian agreement, 46:14 
FCC petition, 49:10 
Subscriber-Vision 

Skiatron agreement with Matty Fox, 13:7 
petition for rule-making, 38:2, 39:15, 45:9 
Telemeter 

first month’s operation, 8:12 

Palm Springs operation suspended. 23:6, 46:14 



SURVEYS (see also Home Life, TV’s Impact on) 
"Videotown,” 6:12, 37:12, 41:14, 60:14 
CBS county-by-county, 9:1 
Jordan, TV impact on media, 9:5 
Nielsen, cost-per-thousand, 9:12 
J. Walter Thompson, "TV homes, 21 :1 
NBC, daytime viewing, 24:7 
Columbia College, stations & employment, 26:13 
Woodbury College, second sets, 37:11 
Advertest, summer viewing, 39:14 
Crossley and Steward, Dougall merge, 41:6 
ARF’s criteria for ratings, 42:11, 43:14, 62:12 
fall realignment of top 10 shows, 44 :7 
defense of rating services, 44 :7 
“centercasting” electronic polling, 51 :14 
TAPE RECORDINGS & RECORDS 
tape recorder sales, 1:15 
record price cuts, 6:10 
RIAA officers, 8:10 

RCA-Magnecord agreement on tape, 20:12 
Folsom plugs 46s, 27:12 

manufacturers shipping 45s to stations, 30:14, 
31:7, 32:14, 33:7 

“Studio One” show makes hit, 48:8 
Video Tape 

techniques described at IRE convention, 13:8 
color, 22:15, 36:13 
Crosby sells to Westinghouse, 39:8 
TAXES 

DuMont asks better depreciation, 4:8 
receiver excise, 10:10, 11:11, 12:10, 13:10, 14:10, 
16:10, 28:12, 39:12, 62:8 

uhf set exemption proposed, 20:3, 20:11, 31 'I. 

32:12, 33:12, 34:12 
uhf stations get break. 25:11 
components excise, 31:12 
TELEMETER — see Subscription TV 

TELEVISION FUND — see Financial Activity, 
General 

THEATRE TV — see Closed-Circuit 
TRANSISTORS 
silicon, 3:12, 6:11 
RCA atomic battery, 5:16, 6:11 
microphone, 5:15 

Sylvania stabilized germanium, 11 :12 
motion picture projector, 11:12 
all-transistor phone system, 11:12 
hearing aids, 12:12, 50:13 

Bell offers patent-free for hearing aids, 12:12 

Russian claims, 23:12 

Pacific Semiconductors formed, 28:13 

Raytheon 1,000,000th, 32:13 

Bell 440-mc, 35:13 

IBM calculating machine, 41:12 

all-transistor radio, 43:11 

TRANSMITTERS — see Equipment, Telecasting 

TUBES, TV PICTURE (see also individual manu- 
facturers & Color) 

GE estimates 1954 replacements, 1:12 
Picture Tube Mfrs. Assn., 17:15 
90-degree, 18:10, 29:10 
price trends, 20:10 

pro-rata warranty policy. 29:8, 44:11 
Westinghouse light-weight 17-in., 32:12 
Meinken buys Electronic Tube, 34:12 
74-degree, 41:12 
rebuilt, 42:7 

UHF (Ultra High Frequency) (sec also individual 
manufacturers) 

Receivers 

percentage of sets with uhf. 2:13, 6:7, 39:4 
conversion costs termed excessive, 2 :13 
"seeding” with converters proposed, 9:11, 46:10 
new General Instrument tuners, 12:10, 62:8 
WRTV, Asbury Park, converter promotion, 13:6 
excise exemption bill, 20:3 
manufacturers criticized by Reade, 39:9 
Stations 

UHF Assn, denounces "vhf invasion,” 4:14 
NBC affiliates WVEC-TV, Norfolk. 4:14 
Comr. Sterling’s proposals, 5:6 
ARB surveys, 5:6, 17:6 

Sen. Johnson attacks vhf site move, 6:6, 8:3 
meeting sponsored by educators, 8:12, 10:6 
CP for WUTV. Youngstown, sold, 10:2 
Senate hearing, 10:4, 17:3, 20:3, 21:3, 22:1, 23:2, 
24:1, 26:1, 26:3, 27:1, 29:4, 30:2, 31:2 
6 stations protest WGAL-TV increases, 10:12, 
12:14 

DuMont formula for uhf cure, 19:3 
survey of reasons for dropping CPs, 21:9 
youngster’s reallocation plan, 27:14 
Madison Ave. says not selling uhf short, 31 :6 
successful operators report. 33:1, 35:8 
Charleston-C)ak Hill combination rate, 34:7 
petition to make Madison Ch. 3 educational, 36:8 
WMGT, Adams, shift from Ch. 74 to Ch. 16, 
36:14, 38:10, 51:7 

WRAY-TV, Princeton, Ind., on air for elections 
only, 44:3 

revocation proceedings against WSHA, Sharon. 
Pa., 44:3 

WPIX regional network, 44:6 
getting lift from big interests. 48:3, 51:6 
Storer considers Miami conversions, 49:6, 61:6 
FCC survey of income. 49:12 
basic NBC affiliates, 62:6 
Transmitting Equipment 
RCA 12%-kw, 4:3, 7:3, 23:8, 26:10, 31:8 
status of high power, 4:3, 13:6 
FCC considers low-power ban, 8:1, 9:1, 16:6. 

17:11, 21:11, 48:9 
directional antennas, 10:6 



6 



FCC saj^s no difference in channels, 11:4 
GE now selling 12-kw klystrons, 19:7 
Federal 12-kw, 24:6 
DuMont 6-kw, 36:8 

megawatt stations, 33:2, 37:8, 39:2, 42:6, 43:8, 
60:2, 61:9, 62:7 
GE 23-kw, 38:10 



UNIONS & GUILDS 

GE Schenectady goes lUE, 11:11 
RCA-IUE agreement, 20:11 
AFM members’ take from TV, 26:9 
NLRB drops jurisdiction over some stations, 
29:12, 51:9 



C.R.T. Electronics resists organization, 32:12, 
33:12 

pay of TV film employes, 37 :6 
Writers Guild of America, 37:7 
Westinghouse-IUE agreement, 37:10 
AFTRA pension-welfare fund, 42:4, 47:16 
KPIX sabotage, 51:8, 52:12 



MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANDISERS 



ADMIRAL CORP. . 

financial reports, 1:16, 12:13, 20:16, 34:13, 47:16 
new sets, 23:9, 24:10 

Siragusa says 15-in. color dead, 23:10, 47:6 
consolidates engineering and research, 36:13 
drugstore “Old Spice” promotion, 39:12 
power tool line, 40:10 
cites drop in price-per-inch, 41:11 
claims 10% of sales to date, 42:10 
sued by retailers, 62 :8 
AEROVOX CORP., 10:11, 12:12, 60:13 
AMERICAN PHENOLIC CORP., 19:13, 26:15, 
33:15, 46:13 

ARCTURUS ELECTRONICS INC., 22:13 
ARVIN INDUSTRIES INC., 2:12, 10:11, 12:13, 
30:10 

AVCO — see Crosley 

BENDIX RADIO DIV.. BENDIX AVIATION 
CORP., 25:17 

CANADIAN MARCONI CO.. LTD.. 12:12-13 
CAPEHART-FARNSWORTH CORP. 
new sets. 2:12, 24:10 

Argentine subsidiary to make sets, 3:11, 18:10 
financial reports, 17:12, 24:11, 37:8, 60:13 
forms Farnsworth Electronics, 32:13 
sells Coolerator, 62:10 
CBS-COLUMBIA INC. 
new sets, 2:12, 25:17 
fire, 3:11 

executive changes, 9 :9 
color sets, 36:1, 40:8 
CBS-HYTRON, 6:9 

CLAROSTAT MFG. CO. INC., 18:11, 42:11 
CLEVITE CORP., 12:13, 26:15, 33:16 
COLLINS RADIO CO., 12:12-13, 43:12 
CORNELL-DUBILIER, 1:16, 6:16, 20:16, 33:14 
CROSLEY DIV., AVCO MFG. CORP. 

Avco financial reports, 6:16, 13:15, 27:13, 39:14 
Super V, 7:12, 13:12, 24:8, 33:12 
closes Batavia tube plant, 26:19 
new sets, 7:12, 13:13, 24:8, 33:12 
ALLEN B. DuMONT LABORATORIES INC. 
"Duoscopic” sets, 2:13 

enters mobile communications field, 3:8, 11:12 
licenses Australian set maker, 4:11 
reorganizes broadcast equipment div., 6:9 
financial reports, 15:12, 19:13, 39:14, 49:13 
considering radio production, 20:12 
Passaic called “Birthplace of TV,” 24:10 
new sets, 25:17, 40:9 
dunks set in river, 33:12 



EITEL-McCULLOUGH INC., 12:13 
ELECTRONICS CORP. OF AMERICA, 33:13, 
47:15 

EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CO. 
new sets, 1:14, 26:12 

financial reports, 3:13, 10:11, 23:13, 27:13, 37.8, 
49:13 

Canadian affiliate, 14:10 
French production, 39:13 
Israel labs, 47 :15 
color, 49:13 

ships 5000 TVs to Colombia, 51:13 
ERIE RESISTOR CORP., 12:13, 18:11, 34:13 
FEDERAL TELEPHONE & RADIO CO. (IT&T) 
9:10 

FREED ELECTRONICS & CONTROLS CORP., 
1:14 



GABRIEL CO., 9:11, 20:15 
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. (GE) 

reorganizes for color set production, 5:11 

says layoffs don’t mean poor sales, 7:12 

financial reports, 9:11, 17:12, 30:12, 42:11, 61:15 

new sets, 25:17 

two $500,000 funds, 31:10 

light amplifier, 52:9 



GENERAL INSTRUMENT CORP. 

financial reports. 3:13, 21:15, 26:15, 29:11, 
stock offer, 4:12 
Canadian plant, 49:15 
new uhf tuner, 52:8 



42:11 



GENERAL PRECISION EQUIPMENT CORP., 
10:11, 12:12, 18:11, 19:13, 31:13 



GLOBE-UNION INC., 20:15, 33:14 



HALLICRAFTERS CO. 

new sets. 3:11, 26:17, 30:11, 62:10 

sales contest, 4:12 I 

financial reports. 47:15. 61:16 

private-label business, 49:16 I 

HAYDU BROTHERS, 29:11 
HAZELTINE ELECTRONICS CORP. 
financial reports, 13:16 
projection color, 49:6, 61:10 
HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS CORP. 
new sets, 2:12, 28:12 

financial reports, 6:10, 14:12, 18:11, 21:16, 22:14, 
29:11, 44:13 

changes name from Hoffman Radio, 49:16, 51:13 
color sets, 52:7 

INDIANA STEEL PRODUCTS CO., 14:12. 24:11, 
38:14, 61:16 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO., 14:12, 
33:14, 43:11 

INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH 
CORP. — (see Capehart-Farnsworth) 

I-T-E CIRCUIT BREAKER CO., 1:16 
KAYE-HALBERT CORP., 29:9, 30:10, 32:13, 35:12, 
45:13 

MAGNAVOX CO. 

financial reports, 8:11, 16:11, 21:16, 31:13, 40:10, 
46:16 

new sets, 29:9 

franchise agreements, 34:12, 36:12 
electronics lab, 40:11 

MAJESTIC RADIO & TELEVISION CORP., 35:12 
P. R. MALLORY & CO., 9:11, 18:11, 32:13, 43:12, 
44:12 

MONARCH RADIO & TELEVISION CORP., 23:10 
MONTGOMERY WARD (Airline), 31:12 
MOTOROLA INC. 
new sets, 2:12, 28:10 
$5,000,000 expansion, 10:10 

financial reports, 11:13, 19:13, 24:11, 32:13, 43:12, 
44:13, 47:16 
employes’ fund, 12:13 
breakdown of sales, by products, 17:15 
color, 24:11, 34:10, 40:8, 44:10, 47:5 
buys Lee J. Drennan Inc., 46:14, 49:16 
Riverside labs, 47 :16 

MUNTZ TV INC., 5:16, 10:10, 11:11, 12:10, 29:9, 
41:11 

MUTER CO., ll;13, 15:12, 17:12, 24:11, 30:12, 
33:14, 39:14, 44:13 
NATIONAL CO., 12:13, 33:14 
NATIONAL UNION ELECTRIC CORP. 
financial reports, 16:12 
bought by Sylvania, 46:14, 48:12, 49:13 
OAK MFG. CO., 1:16, 12:13, 25:19, 33:14, 46:13 
OLYMPIC RADIO & TELEVISION INC. 

financial reports, 15:13, 18:11, 33:14, 38:15, 

46:13 

purchaser seeking control, 30il2, 32tl3, o4il3 
new sets, 36 :13 

forms Olympic Development Co., 52:11 
PACIFIC MERCURY TELEVISION CORP., 31:13 
PACKARD-BELL CO., 5:15. 18:11, 31:13, 62:11 
PHILCO CORP. 

new sets, 1:14, 2:12, 3:11, 31:11, 52:10 
acquires Dexter Co., 1 :15 
sees Latin American hi-fi boom, 1:15 
financial reports, 2:12, 10:11, 21:16, 32:13, 33:14, 
46:13 

distributor financing, 4:12 
executive realignment, 5:14 
commercial air-conditioners. 11:11 
■strike, 18:5, 19:8, 20:10, 22:12, 23:9, 26:16 
disfranchises distributors, 32:10, 40:9 
Govt, anti-trust suit, 61:1, 62:8 
RADIO & TELEVISION INC., 26:19 
RADIO CONDENSER CO.. 16:11 
RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA (RCA) (see also 
Color) 

ad account, 6:14, 8:12 
atomic battery, 6:16, 6:11 
I Folsom testimony on non-discrimination, 9:10 
I merit awards to engineers for color, 9:10 

financial reports, 9:11, 19:13, 31:13, 39:14, 43.12, 
61:16 



selling Pulaski cabinet plant, 11:11 
officers’ salaries, 15:13 
new manufacturing-sales divisions, 22:13 
executive shifts, 23:12, 52:12 
military radio attacked as untested. 30:13 
“gloves-off” competition using NBC, 37:11 
Folsom predicts electronics future, 39:11 
semi-conductor operations dept., 46:12 
Walter Bedell Smith elected to board. 49:13 
light amplifier, 52:9 
Receivers 

new sets, 24:8, 50:12 
inventory finance plan, 24:10 
Canadian price-fixing controversy, 48:12 
RAYTHEON MFG. CO., 2:13, 12:13, 27:13, 28:13, 
38:16 

REEVES SOUNDCRAFT CORP., 16:13 
REGAL ELECTRONICS CORP., 2:12 
SCOTT RADIO LABORATORIES. 24:9 
SENTINEL RADIO CORP., 27:13, 45:15 
SERVOMECHANISMS INC., 15:12, 51:14 
SHAW TELEVISION CORP., 62:8 
SIGHTMASTER CORP., 1:15 
SILVERTONE (Sears Roebuck), 12:13, 29:9, 47:14 
SONOTONE CORP., 7:13 

SPARKS-WITHINGTON CO. (Sparton), 8:11, 
32:12, 40:10 

SPRAGUE ELECTRIC CO., 13:16, 44:12, 50:13 
STANDARD COIL PRODUCTS INC., 18:11, 21:15, 
24:11, 31:13, 33:13, 38:15, 43:12 
STEWART-WARNER CORP. 
new sets, 2:12, 33:12 
financial reports, 10:11, 16:13, 31:13 
quitting TV-radio-phono business. 61:12, 52:8 
STROMBERG-CARLSON CO. 
new sets, 3:11, 29:10 
stock issue, 8:11 

financial reports, 9:11, 12:13, 17:12, 26:15, 31:13 
first color set, 22:13 
Mexican production, 31:12 
SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CO. 

FTC tube decision, 1:14, 40:10, 44:11 
financial reports, 1:15, 10:11, 17:12, 29:11, 30:12 
Batavia plant, 13:12 
British color tube production, 25:18 
ceramic receiving tube, 27 :12 
switches ad account, 35:12 
Fullerton plant, 44:11 
atomic energy program. 44:12 
buys National Union, 45:14, 48:12, 49:13 
SARKES TARZIAN INC., 26:13 
TELE KING CORP. 
bankruptcy, 7:13, 13:12, 14:13, 27:12 
Sen. Williams’ charges. 30:10 
TELE-TONE RADIO CORP., 29:11 
TRANS-VUE CORP., 31:12 

TRAV-LER RADIO CORP., 2:12, 14:12, 20:14, 
26:12 

TUNG-SOL ELECTRIC CO., 10:11, 19:13. 32:13, 
45:15, 50:12 

VIDEO PRODUCTS CORP. (Sheraton), 16:10 
WE3STER-CHICAGO CORP., 18:11. 32:13, 48:10 
WELLS-GARDNER & CO., 15:13 
WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 9:11 
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. 
new sets, 1:14, 29:10 
color sets, 9:7, 43:13 
credit subsidiary for dealers, 9 :9 
Canadian setup moves to Brantford, 9:10 
financial reports, 10:11, 26:15, .31:13, 50:13 
sympathy strike, 27:12 
aims for larger share of TV, 38:14 
1,000,000th picture tube, 61 :13 
WESTON ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CORP. 
purchaser reported, 3:13 

Daystrom buying control, 4:13. 20:13, 27:13 
financial reports, 13:15, 44:13 
WILCOX-GAY CORP.. 11:13 
ZENITH RADIO CORP. 
new sets, 7:13, 29:9 

financial reports, 12:13, 18:11, 33:14, 46:13 
Mexican organization, 37:10 



6 




POBilSHED WEEKLY BY RADIO NEWS BUREAD • VYAH BUHL • WASHINGTON 5. O.C. • TELEPHONE STERUN6 3-1755 • VOL. 10: No. 1 

. * January 2 , 1954 



( Quickening Pace of Color TV Activity, page 1 
Commission's 1953 Record — 346 Grants, page 2 
On-Air Total 356, Close to One-a-Day, page 3 
DuMont Takes Over Kansas City UHF, page 3 
1953 Year of New-Station Push — What Next? page 4 
Post-Freeze Economics— FCC's Survey, page 6 



issue: 



More AM Stations — 2584 at Year's End, page 7 
Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 10 
FCC Proposes Special "Beep" FM Services, page 10 
More Price Cuts as Industry Ponders '54, page 1 1 
New Directories of TV Set & Tube Makers, page 12 
Network TV-Radio Billings — Nov. & Jan.-Nov., page 16 



QUICKENING PACE OF COLOR TV ACTIVITY: Commercial availability of tri-color tubes 
was announced by RCA Dec. 30 when it disclosed that in Nov. it had converted entire 
black-&-white facilities and personnel of huge Lancaster, Pa. plant to color tubes. 
First tube is 15-in. planar-mask type (model 15GP22) which RCA has been sampling to 
its customers for some time. Larger sizes probably aren't too far off. 

Price wasn't announced , though it may be given out next week — and thereon 
will depend to large extent the price of color receivers. Nor did RCA indicate rate 
of production — though it's fair to assume it's well ahead of the 2000-a-month RCA 
said it would produce 6-9 months after FCC decision (Vol. 9:26). 

Tube prices historically have always been high on developmental models , then 
come down as commercial production starts. Hence it's reasonable to assume price 
will be lower than the $200 RCA has charged for samples supplied its customers up 
to now, but higher than the |125 recently announced by CBS-Hytron (Vol. 9:47). Good 
guess is about half-way between. Big cost factor is high rejection rate at factory 
— about 50%, as compared with 10-15% for mass-produced black-&-white. 

All RCA black-&-white tubes are now made at its Marion, Ind. plant . Widely 
published newsphotos of Lancaster assembly line this week tend to lend credence to 
trade scuttlebutt that RCA began stockpiling color tubes even before FCC decision, 
which indicates it may be looking forward to market for even more than the 200,000 
outside figure "guesstimated" by industry leaders for all of this year. 

4 * « * 



RCA announcement climaxed preparations of manufacturers for winter marts in 
Chicago Jan. 4-15 , where apparently every set maker who can will show what he has. 

To feed color sets at marts . RCA and some others are aiming to bring programs 
from New York via microwave. Motorola will give first public demonstration of its 
flying-spot scanner for 16mm color film, feeding color and black-&-white receivers. 
Hazeltine has set up flying-spot scanner in its Chicago labs, will deliver pictures 
of slides to Admiral, perhaps others, via AT&T circuits. DuMont has shipped color 
equipment from its New York experimental uhf station, will use its new "Colorvision" 
scanner to display slides on 2 color sets in Chicago. 

After seeing color sets at marts , dealers will get together with the manufac- 
turers at NARDA convention Jan. 12 at Chicago's Conrad Hilton for panel discussion 
on what comes next. For subjects and panelists, see p. 13. 

Manufacturers are using all media , meanwhile, to inform public about costs, 
availability, etc. of color sets. A natural, of course, is TV itself. After FCC 
decision, RCA and CBS took to air immediately, putting top executives before the 
ameras. This week, more joined in, including Westinghouse and Motorola — both of 
which had excellent presentations. On Jan. 14, DuMont will use "What's the Story" 
program for purpose, with panel comprising Kenneth B. Willson, pres, of National 
’etter Business Bureau, Dr. Allen B. DuMont, Dr. T.T. Goldsmith. 



COFYRiaHT 10B3 BY RADIO NKWB BUREAU 



- 2 - 

Admiral was first major manufacturer to set price on color set — $1175 . Its 
pres. Ross Siragusa reiterated expectations of producing 30,000 of the 200,000 he 
estimates industry will build in 1954. He predicted that the industry will produce 
21-24-in. color sets to sell for $600 within 5-6 years. 

Sylvania announced start of pilot production at Buffalo plant, and TV-radio 
gen. mgr. John K. McDonough said he hopes to have saleable quantities of sets in 
hands of distributors by March 1 . First color service school for Sylvania' s 18 dis- 
trict service managers will be conducted in Buffalo, starting Jan. 8. 

More manufacturers announced color shipments to distributors in time for the 
Jan. 1 Tournament of Roses parade colorcast. There's no change in the city-station 
lineup from list published here last week (Vol. 9:52). 

New circuits for use with Lawrence tube were demonstrated to patent licensees 
by Hazeltine last week, sessions continuing this week and next. Method of "process- 
ing" signal, says research v.p. Arthur V. Loughren, permits Lawrence tube itself to 
act as decoder — offering potentially simpler and cheaper production. 

New method doesn't produce quite as good a picture as mask-type tube with 
■;onventional circuits, Loughren says, but he believes more work will bring results 
jUSt as good. Advantages in cost , he adds, should be particularly evident in pic- 
tures of same size — because cost of set with larger mask-type tube is likely to 
rise sharply. But, he adds, it's up to set makers to judge value of new techniques. 

* * * * 

SnTTiming up job of color production , while fending off impatient distributors 
:lamoring for sets, a leading tycoon told us this: 

" Color is still in the engineering stage and won't reach the production line 
’or at least 6 months. We're making a few hundred sets for loan and demonstration, 
but that's all. By mid-July, our tooling should be complete, and by end of 1954 we 
will have 21-in. color sets, with tubes available not only from RCA but a lot of 
other companies." Sets recently built, he said, "are already outmoded." 

CONNISSION'S 1953 RECORD— 346 GRANTS: FCC closed old year with 2 TV CPs and one ini- 

tial decision, for total of 346 TV grants in 1953 — about double the 175 in 1952. 

This week's grants : A lexandria, La . , KALB, Ch. 5; Erie , Pa. , Commodore Perry 
Bcstg. Service, Ch. 66, final decision. Initial decision favored WKDN, Camden. N.J ., 
for Ch. 17 (allocated to Philadelphia) after competing applicant WJMJ dropped out. 

Ale xandria grantee's owners interlock with grantees KPLC-TV, Lake Charles, 

La. (Ch. 7) ; WSLI-TV, Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 12), and applicant KRMD, Shreveport, La., 
one of 3 applicants now temporarily combined in operation of interim KSLA (Ch. 12). 
Grant resulted when KALB agreed to let competing KSYL buy 49% of grantee. 

Other mergers and dropouts this week, paving way for early grants: Perkins 
Bros, dismissed application for Sioux City's Ch. 4 , leaving KCOM as sole applicant, 
in return for option to buy 50% of grant. KXOB, Stockton. Cal , petitioned to with- 
draw from Ch. 13 hearing with Radio Diablo (TV maker H.L. Hoffman ) under option per- 
mitting owners Theodore & Joseph Gamble to purchase part of grantee. Also dropping 
out was Lorain (0.) Journal , leaving WEOL, Elyria only applicant for Ch. 31. 

Att acking Commission's haste in scheduling Jan. 8 hearing to sniff out a pos- 
sible "strike" application in connection with me rger of applicants for Buffalo's 
Ch. 2 (Vol. 9:50), Buffalo's sole uhf station WBUF-TV (since WBES-TV went off air, 
Vol.~9 :51) this week petitioned to intervene in proceedings. WBUF-TV didn't say it 
would file for Ch. 2, but said the combined applicants, if granted, would provide 
stiffer competition than a non-AM non-newspaper grantee might — and added that it 
had relied on FCC policies which led it to expect longer time to get uhf established 
before more vhf competition opened up. 

In other petitions , Engineer Frank K. Spain, Tupelo, Miss, asked addition of 
Ch. 9 to Tupelo by substituting 11 for 9 in Jackson. Miss . ; KALE, Richland, Wash, 
asked FCC to shift Ch. 3 from Lewiston, Ida , to Richland. 

FCC called another grantee on carpet this week, told KAGR-TV, Yuba City, Cal. 
(Ch. 52) it isn't convinced it deserves additional time to build. 



3 



ON-AIR TOTAL 356, CLOSE TO ONE-A-DAY: Only 5 new starters to report as we went to 
press Thu. afternoon, Dec. 31 — with remote chance a few more might get going be- 
fore week is out. For example, Michigan State College's WKAR-TV, Lansing (Ch. 60) 
was striving desperately to be ready to carry Rose Bowl game Jan. 1, but prospect at 
this writing seemed dim. And W BTM-IV, Danville, Va . (Ch. 24) was still hoping for 
New Year's Eve debut, with possibly better chance of making it. 

Year thus ends with 356 stations on air commercially or with test patterns, 
234 of them vhf, 122 uhf. In other words, 231 starters this year . Of these, 145 
got on air in the 153 days since Aug. 1 when we predicted one-a-day for rest of year. 

WFBC-TV, Greenville. S.C . (Ch. 4), call letters changed from originally as- 
signed WGCT, began testing 25-kw RCA transmitter (lOO-kw ERP) on Dec. 26, second 
station in city — other being WGVL (Ch. 23) which started last July 15. Telegram 
from gen. mgr. B.T. (Bevo) Whitmire reports "beautiful coverage of Carolinas and 
parts of Georgia and Virginia." Tower and 6-bay antenna on Paris Mt. give radiation 
from 1204 ft. above average terrain. Station is result of 3-way merger , whereby 
radio WMRC is sold to WAKE. R obert A. Jolley's Textile Bcstg. Co. holds 39% of new 
operating firm, Roger Peace's Greenville News-Piedmont (WFBC), 39%; Alester G. Fur- 
man Jr.'s Carolina Television Inc., 22%. WFBC-TV goes commercial Jan. 1 as NBC pri- 
mary and with $325 base rate. Rep is Weed. 

KHOL-TV, Kearney, Neb . (Ch. 13), about 125 mi. west of Lincoln and opening 
up new TV area, began testing Xmas eve with 5-kw GE transmitter and 500-ft. Stain- 
less tower. It's owned by local group headed by Dr. F. Wayne Brewster , has Duane 
Watts, ex-KHAS, Hastings, Neb. as gen. mgr, ; Jack Gilbert, ex-WTTV, Bloomington, Ind. , 
program mgr. ; Jack Lewis, ex-KGFW, Kearney, chief engineer. It expects AT&T inter- 
connection for CBS & DuMont service by Feb. 1. Base rate is $200. Rep is Meeker. 

WCOC-TV, Meridian, Miss . (Ch. 30), on the coaxial route between Birmingham 
and Jackson, Miss, but planning no network interconnection, has begun interim test 
patterns, reports owner-mgr. Withers Gavin , and will begin testing with full 252-kw 
ERP from 12-kw GE transmitter shortly. It starts just 3 months after vhf WTOK-TV 
(Ch. 11) got under way in same community (Vol. 9:40). Mr. Gavin also owns radio 
WJQS, Jackson, and AMs in Macon, Miss. & Columbus, Miss. ; he also publishes reli- 
gious weekly Clarke County Tribune, Quitman, Miss. TV rate is $150, no rep. 

Note ; Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s second Montreal station CBMT (Ch, 6) did 
not make it last weekend, as expected (Vol. 9:52), is still waiting for antenna. 

DoNONT TAKES OVER KANSAS CITY UHF: DuMont became first network to go into uhf when 
it acquired Kansas City's KCTY (Ch. 25) from uhf pioneer Herbert Mayer's Empire Coil 
Co. at 12:01 a.m. New Year's Day. DuMont already owns 3 vhf. 

Transaction came suddenly , was first broached on Dec. 29, approved by FCC at 
special meeting Dec. 31. DuMont took over all equipment, full 5-year lease on real 
estate as well as station's obligations, for nominal cash payment of $ 1. Station is 
well-equipped, even to remote unit, has specialized in local originations, cost its 
owners some $750,000 to date in equipment, property and operating losses. 

DuMont immediately dispatched Donald McGannon . its asst, director of broad- 
oasting, to supervise the changeover, announced acquisition will put "DuMont network, 
research & manufacturing divisions in a position to study at firsthand the problems, 
both financial and commercial, faced by fuhfl station owners ." KCTY staff will be 
retained intact, at least for time being. 

Network will funnel 21 of its shows to station weekly, plans to begin large- 
scale campaign to add to the claimed 60-70,000 uhf-equipped sets in area. It's also 
understood the station will get first 15-kw DuMont uhf transmitter, when available 
(it now has RCA 1-kw). 

Coincidental with transfer . Empire Coil dropped its CPs for uhf KDEN, Denver 
(Ch. 26) and WNES, Indianapolis (Ch. 67), telling FCC that building them "would”^” 
fraught with virtually insurmountable conversion problems and heavy monetary losses." 

Empire Coil Co ., a major TV-radio component manufacturer, pioneered both vhf 
i uhf. A newcomer to broadcasting, its pres. Herbert Maver first applied for sev- 
eral TV station in 1947, while many old-line radio broadcasters eyed it askance. He 



4 



began operation of WXEL, Cleveland (Ch. 9 ) late in 1949, and has been consistently 
very successful. Then, in Sept. 1952, he opened world's first commercial uhf outlet, 
Ch. 27 KPTV in TV-less Portland, Ore . , having purchased RCA's prototype Bridgeport 
experimental uhf equipment. This also has been highly profitable operation — in 
fact, is regarded by many as showcase of what uhf can do if it's first in its area. 

Kansas City was his second uhf venture , his first under the gun of vhf com- 
petition. When KCTY went on air last June, only other station there was pre-freeae 
VDAF-TV, and other vhf applicants appeared to be headed for endless FCC hearings. 

/at mergers and dropouts quickly resulted in 5 more vhf rivals — shared-time WHB-TV 
KMBC-TV and KCMO-TV — who were able to grab off most of local business because 
pf vhf's greater coverage in heavily vhf-saturated Kansas City. 

Vast efforts and funds were poured into uhf station in attempt to gain foot- 
hold, but within a month it was evident public wasn't willing to convert fast enough 
'.’hen it could get programs of 3 networks on vhf (KCTY had DuMont). KCTY went on the 
larket, first at $750,000, then $400,000, finally $300,000. There were no takers 
any price — nobody even willing to name his own figure. 

Mayer considered going off air and salvaging what he could from sale of his 
equipment and property — which would have been better deal financially than DuMont 
transaction — but decided such a move would have depressing effect on uhf. 

♦ ♦ * * 

Another uhf CP was dropped this week — KICU, Salinas, Cal . (Ch. 28), making 
38 grants surrendered during 1953. In letter to the FCC, half owner Grant Wrathall 
blamed "network disinterest " (in capital letters). He added: "Until TV programs on 
magnetic tape are available at moderate cost and free from the throttling monopoly 
of networks and strategic vhf stations, [uhf] is virtually doomed in small citie s." 
He also blamed "superpower grants" to San Francisco stations (75 mi. away) and high 
cost of interconnection, which he said was $5400 a month from San Francisco. 

Wrather also has interests in KOPR-TV, Butte, Mont. (Ch. 6) and in vhf grants 
in Salt Lake City and Boise, Pocatello & Idaho Falls, Ida. 

1953 YEAR OF NEW-STATION PUSH-WHAT NEXT? Year just ended saw 230 new stations get 
going, bringing U.S. total to 355 — nearly triple number on air as of Jan. 1, 1953. 
That fantastic growth, plus adoption of compatible color standards , highlighted TV's 
most exciting year. Now, we venture our own forecasts for the industry's New Year — 
but first some comment on what we said here, rightly and wrongly, just year ago: 

Wrong : We forecast only 75-100 new stations would start during 1953, which 
began with 125. We were way off, though by April we raised our sights to 200 and on 
Aug. 1 we predicted one-a-day for rest of year — and hit it very olose. We forecast 
10-12 educational TV stations on air by end of 1953; actually, only 2 made it. We 
figured diminishing radio broadcasting revenues in 1953; at this writing, happy to 
relate, it looks like radio as whole will do slightly better than record 1952. 

We thought pay-as-you-look TV would get hearing during 1953; it didn't, even 
though it made a lot of noise and pulled off persuasive inauguration in Palm Springs 
in Nov. (Vol. 9:49). We thought new FCC appointees (succeeding Walker and Merrill) 
would be businessmen; instead, Eisenhower ohose govt, careerists (Doerfer and Lee). 

Right : We predicted not less than 6,000,000 , probably as many as 7,500,000 
TV sets would be made and marketed in 1953, same as in 1952; output actually went to 
7,300,000, sales ran about 6,400,000. We said business of telecasti ng might go as 
high as 3500,000,000 ; present estimates come pretty close to that (Vol. 9:52). 

We were right , of course, in predicting NPA would lift ban on manufacture of 
color TV sets and that compatible color would win FCC approval. And we said FCC 
would prove more cooperative with industry , not only as regards color but in speed- 
ing new stations on air and otherwise treating the business less suspiciously. We 
said Congress would vote more funds to FCC to hasten TV hearings (it did) and also 
that perennial Congressional investigations wouldn't amount to much (they didn't). 

We forecast most new stations would be brought within reach of networks via 
expanding coaxial-microwave links, as they have. We said community antenna syste ms 
would continue to expand — and they did, as we'll report more fully later. 



- 5 - 

But enough of the past . What*s in store for 1954 ? Here are summaries of 
best thinking of the entire editorial staff of Television Digest, as we begin our 
10th voliime in the 9th year since publication of Vol. 1;1 on Sept. 1, 1945: 

^ TELECASTING ; Possibly 200 more stations , more likely fewer, even though 226 

CPs are now outstanding and FCC continues to authorize more each week. Quite a few 
more CP holders will drop out , as did 38 during 1953. There may be more mortalities 
among stations already on the air (3 quit last year — in Roanoke, Buffalo & Nampa, 
Ida.). FCC may force some long-time and obvious stallers to hand in their permits. 
Telecasting as a business (network & station revenues) will soar far above the $500 ,- 
000,000 figure , and will easily forge well ahead of radio broadcasting which may hit 
that figure when 1953 tallies are done. Several rep firms will surge to the top 
levels, as a few old-line radio reps continue to loom less important. 

SET OUTPUT & TRADE TRENDS ; Some 5,000,000 black-&-white sets should be made 
and marketed this year — more or less depending on impact of color. And if industry 
made and sold 13,000,000 radios (heavily table models and including auto sets) in a 
TV boom year like 1953, we see no reason why it shouldn't do just as well in 1954. 

TV output will be comedown from 1953 's 7,300,000, of course, and competition will be 
keener , prices are already lowering under the influence of color, reduced tube costs, 
softer markets, high inventories. Concentration will be on 17 & 21-ln. models , for 
most part table, size & price appealing to most families until ready and able to buy 
color sets. Replacement market is good, but not as strong as it might be if people 
weren't inclined to patch up old sets (particularly the costly models) and wait for 
color. Service business should reach all-time high . Military procurement will drop 
a bit — but production, research & development will stay close to 1953 's $3 billion . 

COLOR ; Some 200,000 sets will be made , mostly with 15-in. mask-type tubes 
(ll)^-in. picture), a few with 17-in. Lawrence type — and pilot production of larger 
tubes of all types should start after midyear. There will be steady reduction in 
number of circuit tubes required, and more and more "packaged" subassemblies will cut 
cost and servicing. Price of early small-screen sets will seldom go under $1000 at 
outset, gradually reducing as tubes and sets are easier to make — same evolution 
that saw first 10-in. at $425 in 1946 come down to today's 21-in. at $200 and less. 
Most interconnected stations will be equipped to rebroadcast network color , a few 
ready to handle slides, not many able to originate either live or film which will 
come mostly from network origination points. AT&T will be able to bring color to 
almost all stations equipped to rebroadcast it, including some on coaxial. And there 
will be many notable "firsts "; views from ships, planes & helicopters, sports, the 
Mardi Gras, Atlantic City beauty contest, pet shows, circuses, rodeos, etc. etc. 

UHF ; Programming and conversion will continue as biggest problems for uhf 

stations in markets also well-served by vhf , with virtually every angle tried out 

including experimentation with off-air pickups or " quasi-satellite " operation. Uhf 
•vill continue to be a study in contrasts, with some stations dominating their areas 
(as in California's San Joaquin Valley) or so well established (as in Portland, Ore. 

& Duluth, Minn.) that they show good profit . But others will continue to operate at 
a loss . Big networks may acquire own uhf stations, may affiliate with more, but by 
and large they and sponsors will continue to favor vhf whenever there's any choice. 
Uhf-equipped sets will account for increasing proportion of black-&-white sales, and 
speed of conversion in uhf areas will continue to depend almost entirely on uhf pro- 
gramming and number of stations available in area. Uhf may be standard in color sets . 

♦ i* ♦ * 

That's the larger picture . Considering some of the other important proble ms 
of telecasting and related fields, these are the prospects as we see them ; 

Educational TV ; Protagonists aren't bragging about their record of mere 2 
stations on air, 27 CPs still to be built, 17 applications outstanding at year's end. 
Biggest blow last year was rejection by N.Y. State Temporary Commission on Educa- 
tional TV of plan for state-financed 10-station network (Vol. 9:9-10) ; hope had been 
It would be beacon for skeptical legislatures elsewhere. Despite publicity promises, 
we see at best only a half dozen more educational stations taking the air in 1954. 

Pay-as-You-Look TV : Congress and the FCC to play ring-around-the-rosy , both 



- 6 - 

probably holding hearings under pressure of interested parties — with fair chance 
of a "yes" or "no" decision by year's end. FCC might pass buck on to Congress, ask- 
ing legislation delineating whether airwaves must be "free". 

Boosters & Satellites ; FCC hearings likely, with Commission inclined to ap- 
prove them for towns too small to support conventional stations. 

Community Antenna Systems ; Steady growth to continue, very likely getting 
impetus as more operators experiment with pay-as-you-look and local originations. 

Theatre TV ; To continue service via AT&T, not by its own frequencies. Maybe 
one application for specialized theatre-TV common carrier service, backed by group 
of movie exhibitors and possibly Western Union; decision on such petition unlikely 
.ithin year due to AT&T opposition. As exhibitors lose interest in 3-D, etc., more 
Iheatre-TV programming can be expected, possibly regular weekly theatre-TV shows in 
. few theatres by end of year. 

Sports ; Another year of college football TV controls by NCAA , but some fur- 
ther relaxations in prospect this year — including more televising of sellout games, 
more games of regional interest. Little noticeable change in number of pro football 
and baseball telecasts despite court's decision in football case (Vol. 9:46). 

Film ; Ratio of film-to-live network programming to show little significant 
change this year, but over-all amount of film programming to increase due to needs 
of greater number of independent stations. Shakedown period among TV film producers 
and distributors to continue, with some large companies striving to dominate just as 
the "majors" now dominate movie business. Trickle of more recent feature films to 
TV to continue, though major break into the vaults unlikely in 1954. 

Congress ; Will dabble in a few subjects, such as pay-as-you-look and maybe 
the economics of telecasting (as red-ink stations complain). Plenty of complaints 
and recriminations about political telecasts — for it's an election year. 

POST FREEZE ECONOMICS— FGC's SURVEY: Commission this week filled in details of its 
first study of post-freeze TV stations, highlights of which were revealed in recent 
address by Comr. John C. Doerfer (Vol. 9:52). 

Figures must be handled with care , as FCC pointed out in releasing analysis 
of its careful survey, prepared by its economic div. under chief H.H. Goldin . Very 
few conclusions can be drawn from report, since it includes only those post-freeze 
stations on air as of Aug. 1 . At that time, average station had been operating just 
5 months, most were the only stations in their community — and only 2 of the uhf 
outlets measured were in markets with pre-freeze stations. 

It's the only definitive post-freeze financial data available , nevertheless, 
ind therefore deserves close scrutiny — particularly by prospective telecasters. 
Copies are available from FCC (Notice 53-1744) or we'll get one for you if you wish. 

Two clear-cut trends do show up ; (1) Uhf outlets seem to do as well as vhf 

least in the early days — where they're only stations in community. Within 

scope of study, figures for vhf & uhf stations are remarkably similar, as to profit- 
ability, revenues from networks, losses, etc. (2) Distance from nearest vhf is an 
extremely important factor in early success of uhf stations. The 8 profitable uhf 
outlets were all more than 50 mi. from nearest vhf, and 9 out of 10 of heaviest uhf 
.osers were within 50 mi. of at least 2 vhf stations. 

Principal points of FCC report , which was compiled on basis of questionnaires 
to 101 post-freeze stations, the 4 networks and TV equipment manufacturers: 

Over-all profit in operations to date was reported by 8 vhf & 8 lohf stations 
of the 83 (42 vhf, 41 uhf) responding. Another 20 stations (12 vhf, 8 uhf) reported 
at least one profitable month , despite over-all loss for period; 15 mo re (7 vhf, 8 
uhf) were approaching break-even point on a monthly basis; the remaining 32 (15 vhf, 
17 uhf) showed " continued substantial losses in each month of operation." 

The 8 profitable vhf stations reported average monthly revenues of |26,000, 
average monthly expenses of $20,000, average monthly profit of $6200 . The 8 uhf 
money-makers had $26,400 monthly revenues, $20,300 expenses, $6100 profit . 



7 



Among unprofitable stations , those in the black at least one month showed 
average monthly loss of $5900 for 12 vhf stations, $2600 for 8 uhf stations . Average 
monthly loss of 7 vhf stations approaching monthly break-even point was $2100, of 
8 uhf $4700. For stations with continuing substantial losses, average monthly loss 
was $12,700 for 15 vhf, $14,700 for 7 uhf. 

Age of average profitable station was 8.6 months for vhf, 6.8 months for uhf . 
Average age of stations in other profit groups was 3.5 to 5.8 months, disclosing no 
discernible trend as between vhf & uhf. 

Stations in larger markets generally fared better than those in smaller ones. 
All 8 profitable uhf stations were in markets over 100,000 , while 4 of the 8 profit- 
able vhf outlets were in similar situations. Of the 14 stations in markets of over 
300,000, five (or 36%) were profitable. In markets of 100,000-300,000 . seven of 37 
(19%) reported profit; below 100,000 . only 4 of 32 (12.5%) were in the black. Some 
30% of uhf stations reporting, and 43% of vhf, were in markets over 100,000. 

Network commercial programs (one or more) had been carried by 35 of the 42 
vhf stations , and by 34 of the 41 uhf . Of stations in operation less than 6 months, 
average compensation from networks totaled $3700 for vhf, $8200 for uhf; of those 
jperating more than 6 months, it was $40,000 for vhf, $30,000 for uhf. Average sta - 
tion got 13% of its total revenue from networks ; average vhf 10%, average uhf 15%. 

Set saturation in majority of uhf markets was below 25% as of Oct. 1953, and 
10 uhf market had more than 50%. Of the 8 profitable uhf stations, 4 had 25-50% 
saturation, 2 had less than 25%, and information on remaining 2 was unavailable. 

« I* « ii< 

About 2.400,000 uhf-equipped sets & converters had been produced to Aug. 31, 
according to REIMA estimate included in survey. The breakdown ; 1,000,000 receivers 
with uhf tuners built-in at factory and shipped to distributors & dealers ; 700,000 
uhf tuners and converters shipped for field conversion; 700,000 uhf sets, tuners and 
converters in factory inventory. RETMA statistics also revealed that 35% of TV sets 
produced in Nov. were equipped for uhf, up 5% from Oct. (Vol. 9:50). 

As for transmitters , FCC reported "the major transmitter manufacturers indi- 
cated that uhf transmitters of 50-kw rated power are not expected to be in commer- 
cial production until late 1955 or early 1956." RETMA told Commission 124 vhf & 108 
uhf transmitters had been produced between Jan. 1, 1952 and Aug. 31, 1953. 



MORE AN STATIONS-2584 AT YEAR'S END: TV notwithstanding, there was an increase of 
68 in total radio stations authorized by FCC during 1953. This surprising fact is 
disclosed in our 1954 AM-FM Directory , which will be ready in about 2 weeks. Oft- 
predicted decline of AMs simply hasn't happened, but there were 47 fewer FMs . 

Actual figures are these : Total AMs authorized at end of 1953 was 2584 . of 
which 2451 were licensed and on air and 133 CPs. On same 1952 date , total was 2516 , 
of which 2377 were licensed and on air and 139 were CPs. At end of 1951, total was 
2410; 1950, 2351 ; 1949, 2246 ; 1948, 2131 ; 1947, 1961 ; 1946, 1579 ; 1945, 1056 . 

FM grantees totaled 602 at end of 1953 . of which 550 were on air. Year ago 
total was 648, with 612 on air. During last year, 69 FM licenses and 7 CPs were 
dropped. At end of year only 6 applications for new FM stations were pending at FCC. 

The 1954 AM-FM Directory (cost per extra copy, $7.50) also lists all appli - 
cations for new AM stations pending as of Dec. 31. They totaled 207, as against 232 
year before. Dropped during 1953 were 7 AM licenses, 15 CPs. 



Canada's radio stations increased to 191 from 190 during year, Mexico's to 
420 from 315, Cuba's to 121 from 106 — all listed with addresses, facilities, etc. 



Roman Catholic Church has set up first “TV office” in 
Rome to provide weekly “moral evaluations” of programs 
on the Italian TV network and to develop religious pro- 
grams. It’s headed by Ildefonso Cardinal Schuster, 
Archbishop of Rome. 

Council of Bishops of the Methodist Church, meeting 
recently at St. Simons Island, Ga., approved $296,000 
fund-raising drive for production of TV programs. 



Closed-circuit theatre-TV business meeting for per- 
sonnel of National Dairy Products Corp. (Sealtest) will 
be piped to theatres in 16 cities Jan. 21 by Theatre Net- 
work TV Inc. A feature of the meeting will be a 2-hour 
“large-scale TV entertainment program.” 

Ford Motor Co. holds theatre-TV sales meeting Jan. 
28 for personnel in 31 cities, arranged by Box Office TV 
Inc. thru J. Walter Thompson agency. 



8 



PsrSOnsl Nolss: Edward R. Murrow, who is v.p. of CBS 
and a director, is subject of “profile” by Charles Werten- 
baker in Dec. 26 New Yorker . . . Edward Codel, since 
1947 TV director of Katz Agency, station reps, and asst, 
treas. H. J. Grenthot elected to firm’s board of directors 
. . . D. S. (Tony) Provost, gen. mgr. of Hearst Radio, 
elected to board of Hearst Corp. . . . Floyde E. (Bud) 
Beaston appointed sales mgr. of WNBQ, Chicago, report- 
ing to WNBQ-WMAQ sales director Charles Dresser; 
John McPartlin assigned to special WNBQ sales develop- 
ment projects . . . Carl T. Jones, ex-chief, radio branch. 
Federal Civil Defense Administration, and ex-FCC, joins 
consulting engineer George Gautney; firm name changes to 
Gautney & Jones . . . Norman Nelson resigns Feb. 1 as 
managing director. So. California Broadcasters Assn. . . . 
Ewald Kockritz, WGBS, Miami, and ex-WLW & WSAI, 
Cincinnati, named director of programming for all Storer 
stations, headquartering at new Miami offices . . . Howard 
Meyers, western sales mgr., 0. L. Taylor Co., resigns Jan. 
1; he’s second major official to quit, Lloyd George Venard 
having resigned as pres, and understood to be planning to 
start own rep firm . . .Robt. W. Standart shifted from 
gen. mgr. to sales v.p., WITV, Ft. Lauderdale, sharing 
Miami offices with Wallace E. Stone, national sales mgr. 
. . . Fred Griffiths, ex-traffic chief, promoted to TV opera- 
tions coordinator WJAR-TV, Providence . . . Fred Henry 
resigns as program director, KLAC-TV, Los Angeles (now 
owned by Copley Press, changing call letters to KCOP) ; 
he joins ex-mgr. Don Fedderson’s new TV packaging firm 
. . . Mark Raskovich, WBTV, Charlotte, wins first annual 
Jefferson Award given by Jefferson Standard Bcstg. Co. 
for most outstanding suggestion for operation improve- 
ment . . . Ralph Kanna, ex-Goldman, Walter & Kanna ad 
agency, Albany, named program director, WKNB-TV, 
New Britain, Conn.; Peter A. Stoner named news direc- 
tor . . . Jack Black promoted to sales mgr. of WTAR-TV, 
Norfolk . . . Wm. Kotera promoted to director of engineer- 
ing, Glenn Flynn succeeding him as chief engineer, WOW- 
TV & WOW, Omaha . . . John Bone named mgr. of up- 
coming WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich. (Ch. 5), due to start 
Jan. 24; Lee Stevens is acting chief engineer . . . Robt. J. 
Sullivan, ex-CBS Radio Sales, named sales promotion mgr., 
WOR-TV & WOR, N. Y. ; Annette Francis, ex-Ziv, named 
asst. . . . Virginia Renaud succeeds Barbara Tobin as direc- 
tor of education WBBM-TV & WBBM, Chicago . . . Glenn 
D. Gillett, ex-Washington radio consulting engineer, moves 
Jan. 1 to Los Angeles, where he will join a cousin in opera- 
tion of Ulrey & Gillett, Maywood, Cal. (electric motors) 

. . . Quin Ryan, onetime mgr. of WGN, Chicago, has re- 
turned to Chicago from California to join radio WJFL 
. . . Edward L. Koenig Jr., ex-BBDO and Young & Rubi- 
cam, promoted to v.p. in charge of sales & adv., Vitapix 
Corp. . . . Tom Keady, ex-TV-radio director of Pilluk Adv., 
San Antonio, named mgr. of Houston office of Ruthrauff & 
Ryan . . . Leslie Dunier, ex-Worth Stores, named TV-radio 
timebuyer, Emil Mogul Co. . . . Maury Long, business mgr. 
of Broadcasting-Telecastivg, promoted to v.p. & gen. mgr.; 
Edward L. Sellers, ex-NARTB, recently with Carl Byoir, 
named southern sales mgr. . . . Reed Rollo as of Jan. 1 
became managing resident partner, Washington office, 
Kirkland, Fleming, Green, Martin & Ellis; R. Russell 
Eagan promoted to partner ... Si Steinhauser, veteran 
TV-radio editor, Pittsburgh Press, has resigned to make 
home in Miami Beach . . . Wm. Hedgpeth named director 
of administration, program dept., WTOP-TV & WTOP, 
Washington. 

■ 

Lt. Col. Wm. B. Campbell, originally a candidate for 
FCC, now seeking still-vacant secretaryship, is endorsed 
by 44 members of New York’s Overseas Press Club in tele- 
gram to Chairman Hyde Dec. 28. He was aide on broad- 
casting matters at SHAEF during war. 



Telecasting Notes; Top dozen TV-radio agencies in 
1953, as ranked in Dec. 28 Broadcasting-Telecasting : 1. 
BBDO, $35,000,000 TV billings, $14,500,000 radio (com- 
prising 40% of agency’s overall billings in all media). 

2. Young & Rubicam, $34,000,000 & $15,000,000 (35%). 

3. J. Walter Thompson, $21,500,000 & $13,500,000 (24%). 

4. Benton & Bowles, $20,200,000 & $11,800,000 (60%). 

5. Blow, $24,000,000 & $8,000,000 (60%). 6. Wm. Esty, 

$21,000,000 & $8,000,000 (50%). 7. Dancer-Fitzgerald- 

Sample, $9,000,000 & $18,000,000 (55%). 8. McCann- 

Erickson, $17,500,0006 $8,000,000 (40%). 9. Ted Bates, 
$18,000,000 & $6,000,000 (60%). 10. Leo Burnett, $16,- 
800,000 & $7,200,000 (50%). 11. Foote, Cone & Belding, 
$10,000,000 & $8,000,000 (30%). 12. Lennen & Newell, $14,- 
000,000 & $4,000,000 (55%) ... 32 ad agencies, in all, are 
listed by the trade journal, which reports their combined 
TV-radio billings increased about 25% over 1952 — totaling 
$563,600,000 (TV $372,200,000, radio $191,400,000) . . . 
New on 1953 list of top 32 are Kudner, ranking 14th, with 
$10,200,000 TV & $4,800,000 AM (35%); Geoffrey Wade, 
22nd, with $3,500,000 & $6,500,00 (90%); Doherty, Clifford, 
Steers & Shenfield, 28th, with $4,500,000 & $1,500,000 
(55%); MacManus, John & Adams, 30th, with $4,000,000 
& $2,000,000 (33%); Weiss & Geller 32nd, with $4,000,000 
& $2,000,000 (50%) ) . . . On 1952 list, but not on 1953, were 
Harry B. Cohen, Wm. Weintraub and Erwin, Wasey & Co., 
then ranking 27th, 28th & 29th, respectively . . . U. S. ad 
agencies with London branches soon to be staffed by Amer- 
ican experts on commercial TV as Britain begins spon- 
sored service; Erwin, Wasey already has transferred 
Charles L. Hutchings from Los Angeles to head need TV- 
radio dept, in London office . . . John Guedel, who produces 
the Groucho Marx and Art Linkletter shows, will star 
Ginger Rogers in new half-hour film series, each budgeted 
at $37,000; new wrinkle is that Little Theatre groups 
throughout the country will be flown to Hollywood to 
showcase their best, with Miss Rogers as star ... As in 
N. Y. during newspaper strike, the 4 TV and 11 radio sta- 
tions reaped windfall in Minneapolis during last week’s 
truck drivers’ strike that stopped publication of big Min- 
neapolis Star & Tribune (Cowles) . . . Statistical intelli- 
gence from CBS-TV research dept.: The CBS “eye,” seen 
about 10,000,000 times daily on TV, has been seen col- 
lectively more than 75 billion times since introduced as net- 
work’s station-break trademark 2 years ago. 



Vick Knight, head of Los Angeles ad agency bearing 
his name, is closing it dovm as of Jan. 1; its 27 accounts, 
including Kaye-Halbei't TV, are not being transferred as 
group to any other agency. 



1954 AM-FM Station Directory 

All subscribers to the full TV-AM-FM services 
of Television Digest will, in mid- January, receive 
copies of our 195Jf AM-FM Station Directory, re- 
vised to Jan. 1, loose-leaf, printed on single sheets 
so that changes and corrections may be added on 
opposite blank pages as they’re reported in our 
weekly AM-FM Addenda. New directory lists not 
only all North American AM-FM stations by states 
and cities (with company names, addresses, fre- 
quencies, powers, FM antenna heights, network affil- 
iations) but also includes lists of AM & FM stations 
by frequencies, AM & FM applications by states & 
frequencies pending as of Jan. 1, AM & FM stations 
alphabetically by call letters. It’s only handy volume 
of its kind, and carries no advertising. Extra copies, 
if pre-print orders for 10 or more are placed by Jan. 
8, cost $5.00 each ; single copies $7.50. 




9 



Staiion Accoiuiis: New twist in “commercial educa- 
tional” programming: Between halves of Duquesne U 
basketball games, sponsored by Pittsburgh zone Chevrolet 
dealers, WENS viewers get career guidance courses on 
such subjects as college requirements & aptitudes, career 
possibilities in various fields of study, extra-curricular 
activities, etc., under supervision of university’s Dr. Clar- 
ence Walton . . .“Double exposure” plan of KHJ-TV, Los 
Angeles offers sponsors 26 weeks of second-run films free, 
with option to buy other 26 weeks at 50% of regular rate, 
provided program is cut by 1 min. — permitting sale of 
spot adjacencies to other sponsors . . . Kling Peach Ad- 
visory Board will co-sponsor California Peach Fiesta 
starting Jan. 18 and running to end of Feb., along with 
General Mills, Kraft Foods. Hormel Co., using TV-radio 
with other media, thru BBDO, San Francisco . . . Eller- 
man Mfg. Co. (Trix cloth) buys 2 weekly 5-min. local 
news cut-ins on Today on WNBQ, Chicago, thru Roberts, 
MacAvinche & Senne; WNBQ also reports National Tea 
Co. sponsoring 30-min. variety show Mon.-thru-Fri. at 
5:30 p.m., thru Schwimmer & Scott . . . Adam Scheidt 
Co. (Valley Forge beer. Rams Head ale) for third year 
sponsored WCAU-TV telecast of Philadelphia’s famed 
Mummers’ Parade Jan. 1, thru Ward Wheelock Co. . . . 
So. California Plasters Institute, thru Latta & Co., and 
Van Nuys Federal Savings & Loan Co., sponsored Rose 
Bowl Parade Jan. 1 on KNXT, Hollywood . . . Acousticon 
Div., Dictograph Corp., has purchased twice weekly Drew 
Pearson film series from Motion Pictures for TV, to be 
placed on WABD, N. Y., thru Buchanan & Co. . . . Among 
other advertisers reported using or preparing to use TV: 
Carti-Aire Corp. (Carti-Aire air conditioner), thru Prod- 
ucts Services Inc., N. Y. ; Comfi-Coil Inc., Taunton, Mass. 
(Inner-spring hassocks), thru Hammer Co., Hartford, 
Conn.; Pennsylvania Range Boiler Co. (Pennsylvania 
water heaters), thru Feigenbaum & Werman Adv. 
Agency, Philadelphia; Morrell-Foster Co. (Pony soft 
drink), thru Abner J. Galula & Assoc., Philadelphia; 
W. E. Bassett Co., Derby, Conn. (Trim nail clippers), 
thru Lawrence C. Gumbinner Adv. Agency, N. Y.; Man- 
gels, Herold Co., Baltimore (King syrup, starch & bleach), 
thru Buddemeier Co., Baltimore; Landers, Frary & Clark, 
New Britain, Conn. (Universal household appliances), 
thru Goold & Tierney, N. Y. ; Piedmont Airlines, Winston- 
Salem, thru Liller, Neal & Battle Adv., Atlanta; Lucca 
Ravioli Factory, San Francisco (frozen Italian special- 
ties), thru J. Walter Thompson Co., San Francisco. 



NBC Spot Sales, representing 10 TV stations (5 owned 
by network) and 8 AMs (5 owned by network), achieved 
record billings of $22,000,000 in 1953, up $5,000,000 from 
1952, reports Thomas B. McFadden, director of the sales 
organization under v.p. Charles R. Denny, in charge of 
owned-&-operated stations. Spot billings for TV rose to 
$17,500,000, or $4,200,000 ahead of 1952, with NBC’s own 
stations up 22% and non-owned stations up 52%. Spot 
billings for radio were $4,500,000, or $860,000 ahead of 
1952, up 23%. One TV station showed gain of 61%, 
one AM was up 64%. Besides its owi stations, NBC 
Spot Sales staff of 44 now represents KSD-TV & KSD, 
St. Louis; KONA & KGU, Honolulu; WAVE-TV & 
WAVE, Louisville; KPTV, Portland, Ore.; WRGB, 
Schenectady. 

Joe Dine and Allan Kalmus, both ex-NBC trade press 
chiefs, have formed Dine & Kalmus, 4 W. 58th St., New 
York, to handle public relations, publicity and sales pro- 
motion. Dine left NBC to go with Ziv, Kalmus to go with 
Lever Bros., later resigning. 

.lames P. L. Trautwein, ex-announcer for AVSPD-TV 
& WSPD, Toledo, has been ordained an Episcopal priest. 



B ig ADVERTISERS are enthusiastic about color TV, 
although many of them have reservations — pai*ticu- 
larly about the cost. That’s what Tide Mayazine found in 
first definitive survey published, reported in Jan. 2 issue on 
basis of 28% response to poll of some 200 major national 
advertisers. Tide’s conclusions: 

(1) “Most early color TV buyers will be current [TV] 
users, but if the price is right, color will lure new indus- 
tries, like travel firms, photographic equipment makers, 
soft goods manufacturers, floor covering firms, even in- 
dustrial companies.” 

(2) Half of respondents said they’d pay up to 10% 
more for color than current black-&-white costs — CBS pres. 
Frank Stanton has said color would cost 8-10% more than 
monochrome, although average premium for 4-color maga- 
zine ads is about 40% more than black-&-white. Some 25% 
aren’t willing to pay any more for color. 

(3) Where will color TV money come from? Some 
50% said it won’t come from higher over-all ad appropria- 
tions; 12% said they’d be willing to raise the advertising 
ante for color. Some 20% said they’d probably cut maga- 
zine advertising to pay extra costs of color. Virtually all 
other media, including radio, were mentioned as candidates 
for cuts. 

(4) Most advertisers indicated they’d buy color when 
saturation reaches 30-40%, although they started using 
monochrome when black-&-white saturation was 20-30%. 

(5) Half thought color would increase sales; but even 
those who didn’t thought it would be worth buying. 

(6) About 65% said they’re not interested in using 
color in daytime, if it’s not available at night at first; 
20% would use daytime. Half the advertisers “are 
carefully considering color right now” — and 60% said they 
don’t plan to change product packages for color TV. 
Over 60% have seen colorcasts, and majority of reactions 
were enthusiastic. 

Among advertisers and company officials quoted di- 
rectly, O. L. Westgate, v.p. of Atlantis Sales Corp. 
(French products, Good Luck puddings) is quoted as 
calling color TV “the most nearly ideal advertising 
medium ever” and “would be worth at least as much 
extra money as we pay for 4-color magazine ads.” Esso 
adv. mgr. R. M. Gray says his firm will probably appro- 
priate new money for the color TV premium, is carefully 
considering color right now. Armstrong Cork adv. direc- 
tor Max Banzhaf says his firm probably would spend 
10% extra for color, most likely at expense of magazine 
advertising, but doesn’t plan to begin until there’s 50% 
saturation. American Safety Razor, too, would pay extra 
10% at expense of other media. 



Borrowing from the movies’ “continuous perform- 
ance,” WACH-TV, Norfolk-Newport News (Ch. 33) .Jan. 1 
began entirely new type of programming format which 
station manager Frederic F. Clair enthusiastically pro- 
claims “solves every problem of the small uhf station.” 
Using feature film, news, cartoons, short subjects, station 
set up 2-hour schedule, runs it 3 times an evening — at 6, 8 
& 10 p.m. — the same complete show for each performance, 
but a different bill each day. Only spots are sold, mini- 
mum being .3 — at same point in each of the 3 showings. 
Clair lists these advantages for his programming scheme: 
(1) Only one-third of the material is used per night, per- 
mitting station to buy better films. (2) Viewer can see 
complete show during times when his favorite network 
shows aren’t on competing stations; “we can nearly assure 
an advertiser that all the audience will see our whole 
show every evening.” (3) “Because of group-selling and 
repetition, the selling and servicing load is reduced to one- 
third. So are traffic, continuity, production and program 
work-loads.” 



10 



D ES MOINES’ first vhf, which will be WHO-TV (Ch. 

13), authorized last Sept, after competing KIOA 
agreed to pull out on payment of $25,000 for out-of pocket 
expense with option to buy 40% of TV, apparently is 
going to hasten construction — for RCA on Dec. 31 shipped 
it an interim 10-kw transmitter. Day before, RCA also 
shipped new transmitter to WNET, Providence (Ch. 16), 
and on Dec. 31 a 1-kw went to U of Wisconsin’s projected 
new WHA-TV, Madison (Ch. 21). During last week, only 
other RCA shipments were new 50-kw driver to now- 
operating WJAR-TV, Providence (Ch. 10), and 25-kw to 
WBRC-TV, Birmingham (Ch. 6). 

Also pushing for completion is WGAN-TV, Portland, 
Me. (Ch. 13), which got its GE transmitter Nov. 21, and 
on Jan. 2 gets 20-kw amplifier for Feb. 1 target. Same 
day, GE is shipping 1-kw uhf transmitter to KSAN-TV, 
San Francisco (Ch. 32), as well as 6-bay antenna for up- 
coming CHSJ-TV, St. John, N. B. (Ch. 4), due on air in 
Feb. On Jan. 4, another 6-bay antenna is due to go out to 
WTVJ, Miami (Ch. 4). 

KSTM-TV, St. Louis (Ch. 36), puts 12-kw GE trans- 
mitter into operation “within a few days after Jan. 1,” 
claiming 275-kw ERP, non-directional. 

♦ * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week : 

KFBC-TV, Cheyenne, Wyo. (Ch. 6), which had hoped 
for early start despite delay forced when high winds Dec. 
8 blew down its tower, built to 100 ft. of projected 500 ft. 
atop 7000-ft. mountain, now doesn’t expect to be able to 
test already installed DuMont plant before end of Jan., 
reports mgr. Wm. C. Grove. It’s controlled by Tracy S. 
McCraken newspaper interests (Cheyenne State Tribune 
and Wyoming Eagle, among others), has published $150 
base rate, will be represented by Hollingbery. 

WLAC-TV, Nashville, Tenn. (Ch. 5), authorized last 
Aug., has been working on problems of tower height so 
won’t start until “late spring of 1954,” reports T. B. 
Baker Jr., 50% owner of WKDA, which has option to 
acquire half interest in TV outlet. Equipment hasn’t 
yet been ordered, nor has rep been chosen. 

KRGV-TV, Weslaco, Tex. (Ch. 5), now has its GE 
antenna for 750-ft. Phillips tower, aims for Feb. 1 start 
with 5-kw GE transmitter, reports TV director Millman 



Rochester. Owner 0. L. Taylor, who sold rep firm bear- 
ing name to Raymer Co., also is applicant for Ch. 3 in 
Wichita, Kan. Rep will be Raymer. 

U of Washington, Seattle (Ch. 9, educational), last 
week’s grantee, gets start with “substantial” gift of equip- 
ment from KING-TV, plans to order more, is shooting for 
early Sept. 1954 debut, according to Edwin H. Adams, 
head of TV-radio div. 

KEOK, Ada, Okla. (Ch. 10), has RCA equipment 
on order, tower & building scheduled for completion by 
March 15, plans May 15-June 1 start, reports gen. mgr. 
Bill Hoover. Rep not yet chosen. 

KSWM-TV, Joplin, Mo. (Ch. 12), granted last week, 
will order RCA equipment, plans to enlarge radio head- 
quarters for TV, hopes to get going by July 1, 1954, re- 
ports pres. & 50% owner Austin A. Harrison. Rep not yet 
chosen. 

WCNO-TV, New Orleans (Ch. 32), which last prom- 
ised Jan. 1 start, reports now that it’s going to wait for 
Gates 1-kw transmitter in June. It’s to be operated by 
owners of radio WBOK, with Stanley W. Ray Jr. as gen. 
mgr. Besides pre-freeze vhf WDSU-TV (Ch. 6), New 
Orleans has uhf WJMR-TV (Ch. 61), which began oper- 
ating in Oct. (Vol. 9:43). Forjoe will be rep. 

WSJV, Elkhart, Ind. (Ch. 52), plans Feb. 21 tests 
with 1-kw RCA transmitter, programming to begin March 
15. Gen. mgr. is John Dille Jr., pres. & 35% owner of 
grantee Truth Publishing Co., publisher of Elkhart Truth. 
It will be ABC affiliate. Rep will be H-R Television. 

KBID, Fresno, Cal. (Ch. 53), has moved into new 
studio-office quarters in Civic Center, is installing 12-kw 
GE transmitter and RCA antenna, plans to turn on test 
juice in early Jan., begin programming in mid-Jan., reports 
gen. mgr. Robert H. Wesson. It will be city’s third uhf, 
will share KMJ-TV tower on Bear Mt. Hour rate will be 
$225. Rep will be Meeker. It’s first of 3 John Poole CPs 
to begin — KBIC-TV, Los Angeles (Ch. 22), being due next 
spring with plans still indefinite for KBIK-TV, Sacra- 
mento (Ch. 46). 

WNOP-TV, Newport, Ky. (Ch. 74), granted last 
week, hasn’t ordered equipment as yet, plans office-studio 
bldg, which also will house restaurant, swimming pool and 
skating arena, hopes to get on air late in 1954, according to 
pres. James G. Lang. Rep not yet chosen. 



F IDGETING about FM troubles for years, FCC this 
week finally proposed to give green light to some of the 
few techniques FM operators have been able to devise to 
eke out some income — namely, the “functional music” or 
“beep” services. 

In proposed rule-making (FCC Notice 53-1747, Doc. 
10832), Commission announced intention to permit FM sta- 
tions to broadcast functional music, storecasting, transit- 
casting — all the so-called “beep” services which either de- 
lete commercials or emphasize them through transmission 
of supersonic signal. Such services have been allowed, but 
frozen from expansion, ever since FCC decided in 1951 that 
the special services were illegal under its definition of 
“broadcasting” as contained in Communications Act. Since 
1951, Commission asked FM operators to hold everything 
“pending study.” 

In proposing new rules, FCC warns: “Our aim is not 
the conversion of the FM broadcast band to some new 
specialized non-broadcast service or services. On the con- 
trary, authorization of such new ventures must be only as 
an adjunct to the FM broadcast operation, a subsidiary 
service so that the main undertaking — the broadcast serv- 
ice to the public — can draw financial sustenance from it.” 
Commission doesn’t go as far as some FM operators 
desired, since it declines to permit multiplexing such serv- 
ices as taxi dispatching, etc. Specifically, Commission 



(Hennock dissenting) proposed the following and invited 
comments by Feb. 15: 

(1) Reduction of minimum hours of operation, for 
regular programs intended for general public, from 42 to 
36 hours. 

(2) Authorization of subsidiary licenses (Subsidiary 
Communications Authorizations) permitting the special 
services. 

(3) Permitting special services outside the minimum 
of 36 hours of regular programs. 

(4) Permitting special services multiplexed in with 
regular progi'ams any time. 



To test and demonstrate sets before uhf stations are 
on air. Industrial Television Inc. is producing generator 
which uses signal from any vhf channel and translates it 
to uhf signal on any channel. Priced at $149.50, manu- 
facturer says it will aid dealers and servicemen, can be 
used to demonstrate uhf sets in stores and to “convert” 
vhf test equipment to uhf. 

Uhf air monitor receiver-converter is now being 
offered to telecasters by Federal Telecommunication Lab- 
oratories (IT&T). It permits conversion of any single 
uhf channel to a pre-designated vhf channel, is specifically 
designed for monitoring on-air TV transmissions. 




Trade Beport 

January 1 , 1954 






MORE PRICE GUTS AS INDUSTRY PONDERS '54: Trend to lower TV set prices evident last 
week when Philco and RCA announced low-end models at $200 and under (Vol. 9:52), was 
accented when Admiral , Emerson . GE , Westin^house also came out this week with lower 
lists. At Chicago distributors convention. Admiral introduced 5 new 21-in. sets — 
besides announcing $1175 list price for its first color set. Admiral's new models ; 

Ebony table $180 (compared with $200 as lowest 21-in. model in current line) ; 
mahogany table $250 (compared with $270) ; open-face mahogany console $250 ($300) ; 
full-door mahogany console $370 ($430) ; mahogany combination $500 ($400). 

Emerson led its line with 17-in. wood table at $150 & 21-in. v/ood table at 
$180 . Westinghouse showed 17-in. mahogany plastic table at $180 and 21-in. mahogany 
/eneer table at $200. GE introduced no new models but reduced prices by $10 to $40 
on five 17 & 21-in. receivers in 24-model line. (For details of lines, see p. 14.) 

Even lower prices may be forthcoming from other companies, big and small, as 
they show at Chicago marts next week and hold distributor meetings during January. 

What does 1954 hold in store ? TV leaders were inclined to more optimism than 
nation's high-level economists , who generally foresee recession in national economy 
in 1954. For example , consensus of a group of economists of govt, agencies, educa- 
tional institutions and private corporations participating this week in forum spon- 
sored by National Industrial Conference Board was that 5-7% decline in the nation's 
gross national product (the value of all goods and services produced) looms in 1954 . 

At annual forecasting session of American Statistical Assn, in Washington, 
majority of several hundred economists opined national economy is already in down- 
turn and faces " orthodox recession" in 1954 , reported Dec. 29 New York Times. They 
predicted downturn may last through first half of 1954, then continue at slower rate 
for next year or 18 months. 

Authoritative U.S. News & World Report (Jan. 1) foresaw business trend down 
in 1954, up in 1955 . It summarized outlook like this; "1953 has seen the end of 
the boom. 1954 will see the downturn running its course. Resurgence is not expect- 
ed before 1955. For many, business news will not be so good — smaller pay, fewer 
jobs, scarcer orders, lower profits, unwieldy inventories. Some good news also is 
in store, however. Prices of many things are sure to drop . There will be more 
" good buys " in houses, cars, appliances . Living costs may ease. People with fixed 
incomes will have less of a struggle. Value of their dollars is not likely to be 
clipped on inflation. Federal taxes will be reduced." 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

As for industry leaders' opinions , RCA's Frank Folsom said merchandising 
trend changed in 1953 to a buyers ' market that augurs well for business in 1954. 

"The new trend in merchandising represents a closer approach to normal business op- 
erations," he said. "The 14-year sellers' market is gone. Many industries are now 
adjusting their operations to meet the demands of a buyers' market. Careful pl an- 
ning and hard work are needed to maintain the sales volume that developed during 
"he years that business enjoyed a sellers' market." 

He said RCA in 1955 prepared for transition to buyers' market by increasing 
Bfficiency of production, streamlining sales operations and establishing closer re- 
ationship with all levels of trade. He said, too, that TV-radio-electronics is a 
irirae example of an expanding industry . Its annual going rate of nearly $8 billion 
in 1953, with continued growth, could forestall national recession, he said. 

Admiral's Ross Siragusa foresees relatively good year for industry & nation, 
le told his distributors TV-radio-appliance industry offers great opportunities for 
•.ales and profits "if all of us put in more work and more sweat... We can get a bigger 

- 11 - 



12 



share than we ever had if we go after it hammer and tongs." Of the nation's general 
joonomic outlook for 1954, Siragusa commented; 

" The consensus among economists is that 1954 will show a 5-10% decline from 
1953. A decline in that range seems probable to us, but we think it will be closer 
to 5 than 10%. The general economic adjustment has been in progress for some time, 
and we believe it is already further advanced than many people realize. When you 
look behind the conversational pessimism, the actual economic facts are quite favor- 
able." He listed 62,000,000 employed persons, 1,000,000 new homes slated for con- 
struction next year, 10% average reduction in personal income taxes , and easing of 
credit restrictions as factors in the nation's economic favor next year. 

Philco's Wm. Balderston said we could talk ourselves into a recession and 
called on industrialists, economists and "all thinking people" to place more confi- 
dence in our economic system , which he said demonstrated its vitality in 1953 "by 
turning a year of transition into the most prosperous period in history." He added; 

" Our population is growing at a rate of over 2,500,000 persons a year... The 
average income of our wage earners is a third higher than it was before the Korean 
war, and employment continues at a record high. 1954 will see a reduction in the 
tax burden. So-called disposable income is at a peak of about §250 billion. There 
are a number of new and fast-growing industries to give more and more employment to 
our people — among them electronics, air conditioning, plastics and chemicals." 

I* * ^ 

TV production totaled 120,430 week ended Dec. 18, reports RETMA, one week be- 
hind in its count because of holidays. It brought year's output as of that date to 
about 7,150,000 — and with 2 holiday weeks yet to be reported, year's production 
should be between 7,300,000 & 7,350,000 , second only to 1950's record 7,463,800. 
Radios totaled 267,053, bringing year's output to date to about 12,750,000 — with 
likelihood that about 13,000,000 radios, including auto, will be produced in 1953. 

NEW DIRECTORIES OF TV SET & TURE MAKERS: There are now exactly 76 entities manufac- 
turing and/or assembling TV receivers in the U.S., and 27 TV-radio manufacturers in 
Canada , according to survey we've just finished for the directory in our TV Factbook 
No. 18 due off the presses in mid-Jan. At peak , total was just over 100 during TV's 
biggest year, 1950, as listed in the semi-annual edition (No. 11) of July 1950. 

There are 59 companies making vacuum tubes of all kinds, about two-thirds of 
them in cathode ray production and 16 making receiving tubes — a mounting number. 

Absent from the TV set manufacturers' list of 6 months ago are such names as 
Automatic, Freed, Mitchell, National, Snaider, Pathe — primarily because they're in 
other electronics fields now, do not make sets. There were also some bankruptcie s, 
but far fewer than many anticipated in view of intense nature of the competition. 

Though still operating , these were the Chapter XI casualties of the year, not 
one of them a major factor in the business and all still operating; Gotham (taken 
over by Harold Shevers Inc., which dropped own name) ; Jackson Industries (now known 
as Jackson Electronics & Television Inc. and operating subsidiary Trans-Vue Corp. in 
lieu of its now defunct National Electronics Mfg. Co., Los Angeles) ; Jewel (casualty 
along with parent Fidelity Tube Co.) ; Regal (filing in bankruptcy only last week; 
Vol. 9:52) ; Video Products (interlocking with Sheraton) ; Transvision Inc . 

There were only 2 tube makers who went bankrupt — the aforesaid Fidelity and 
Zetka. Only major change in Canada; Transvision-TV Canada now Arcan Corp. Ltd. 



Creditors of Regal Electronics Corp., whose Chapter 
XI petition proposing 75% settlement (Vol. 9:52) is due 
to be heard in N. Y. Jan. 5, include these with accounts 
in excess of $10,000: W. Spiegel, $70,000; GE, $52,644; 
RCA, $35,000; RCA Victor, $19,115; Sylvania, $22,913; 
Hazeltine, $24,700; Tech Art Plastics Co., $18,039; Tele-o- 
Tube Sales Corp., $15,680; Standard Coil Products, $15,388; 
Guardian Electric Co., $14,278; Cosmic Radio Corp., $12,075. 

Jewel Radio’s creditors, shown in schedules filed in 
Federal court in Newark in connection with Chapter XI 
proceedings listing $1,114,880 liabilities and $537,962 
assets (Vol. 9:48), include these with claims exceeding 



$10,000: Fred M. Link, $69,953; GE, $30,645; D’Arcy 
Printing, $19,711; Carbonneau Industries, $15,213; West- 
inghouse, $14,836; Centralab, $11,613; Berglund & Swenson 
Co., $10,639; Sessions Clock Co., $10,456. 

Nearly one in every 7 sets in use will need new pic- 
ture tubes in 1954, GE tube dept. gen. mgr. J. Milton Lang 
predicts — for total of over 4,000,000, about 50% higher 
than 1953. Based on GE market research, he forecast 
1954 industry output of 5,200,000 picture tubes for new 
black-&-white sets, with color tubes about 2% of total 
production. He said electronic tube industry should do 
about $700,000,000 worth of business, some 5% over 1953. 



13 



Trade Personals: Dr. Douglas R. Ewing named direc- 

tor of new physical and chemical research lab at RCA 
Princeton Labs; Ralph S. Holmes appointed director of 
research contracts, Arthur W. Vance director of new spe- 
cial projects research lab . . . Myron Blackman resigns 
as v.p. & director of Pacific Vogue but retains 45% in- 
terest . . . Albert J. Frankel promoted to purchasing 
agent, CBS-Columbia; Roger G. Brown, ex-Emerson, 
named southern sales mgr.; Guy Maken, ex-Emerson, 
named mgr. and Joseph Petrany asst, mgr., material con- 
trol dept. . . . J. F. White, mgr. of CBS-Columbia con- 
tract sales dept., heads new mobile homes-TV dept, for 
design & installation of sets as original equipment in 
trailers . . . John C. Lamson resigns as asst, national 
sales mgr., Muntz TV . . . C. L. Walker named Chicago 
sales mgr.. General Instrument Corp., succeeding B. V. K. 
French . . . Richard D. Schotter named v.p. of Phen-o- 
Tron Inc., 455 Main St., New Rochelle, N. Y., manufactur- 
ing printed circuits and phenolic baseplates; Jack Bayha, 
ex-Emerson Radio, named chief engineer . . . Frank J. 
Moch, of Aide Sound & Radio Service Corp., reelected 
pres, of TV Installation Service Assn, of Illinois, affiliate 
of National Alliance of TV & Electronics Service Assns. 
. . . Paul E. Featherstone quits as v.p. of Capitol Records 
Distributing Corp. to become national sales mgr.. Steel- 
man Phonograph & Radio Co., succeeding James N. Ryan 
Jr., resigned; Willis Wardlow, branch administrator, is 
successor at Capitol . . . James W. Farrow named sales 
mgr., Stromberg-Carlson sound equipment div. . . . Eugene 
B. Shields named southwest district adv. mgr.. Westing- 
house TV-radio div., headquartering in Los Angeles . . . 
Lou Willis, west coast regional sales mgr., goes into “semi- 
retirement” as special western consultant to Admiral . . . 
Joseph Zulwin, ex-Zenith & Admiral, named Hoffman 
Radio midwestern district mgr., Chicago . . . Jerome V. 
Dcevy, recently in law practice, has returned to National 
Union Radio Corp. as director of industrial relations . . . 

F. Leo Granger, distributor sales mgr., appointed sales 
mgr. of Stromberg-Carlson TV-radio div. . . . Gardiner 

G. Greene, ex-Gabriel Electronics, named pres.. Browning 
Laboratories Inc., Winchester, Mass. . . . Howard W. Sams, 
founder & pres, of electronics publishing firm bearing his 
name, will be honored at Indianapolis Athletic Club lunch- 
eon Jan. 7 with award of “Friend of Service Management” 
plaque of National Alliance of TV & Electronic Service 
Assns., heretofore going only to major firms (GE, RCA, 
Sylvania). 

* * ♦ « 

Distributor Notes: Philco appoints newly-formed J. F. 
Leahy Co., 783 Main St., Worcester, Mass. (.1. F. Leahy, 
pres.) . . . Hallicrafters appoints Ambassador Distributors 
Inc., Miami (Marshall Litvak, pres.) . . . Motorola-Chicago 
appoints S. R. Herkes v.p. & gen. mgr., I’eplacing Gil 
Thorne, resigned . . . Philco Distributors Inc., Philadelphia, 
names James Haley TV-radio sales mgr., replacing Dave 
Brody, now gen. sales mgr. . . . Peninsular Distributing 
Co., Detroit (CBS-Columbia) appoints Lawrence Leeson 
sales promotion mgr. . . . GE Supply Co., Chicago, names 
Leigh R. Bench appliance & electronics sales mgr., re- 
placing C. R. Woods, now St. Paul district mgi'. . . . 
State Di.stributing Co., Milwaukee (Emerson) names Win. 
A. Becker sales mgr., Raymond A. Hipp adv. mgr. . . . 
Crosley Distributing Corp., Portland, Ore., announces res- 
ignation of mgr. C. J. Ward. 

RETMA publishes 1953-54 membership directory 
(132-p.), listing personnel of board, depts. & committees; 
names, addresses, telephone numbers & top personnel of 
member companies; trade names, etc. It’s edited by Peter 

H. Cousins, information director. 

National Assn, of Music .Merchants holds midyear 
board meeting at Ponte Verdre Beach Club, Ponte Verdre, 
Fla., Feb. 24-25. 



A RGUMENT over color — who did what — advanced 
■ another round this week following last week’s RCA- 
Philco exchange (Vol. 9:52). To pai'aphrase an old ques- 
tion, “Who killed cock robin?” the question now is, “Who 
hatched the peacock?” 

Zenith pres. E. F. McDonald led off with letter to FCC, 
sending copies to other leading manufacturers. He said 
he was “shocked” at RCA’s “misleading” ads and TV an- 
nouncements claiming major credit for development of 
compatible system. “I have the feeling,” McDonald wrote, 
“that this RCA campaign of misrepresentation is in some 
way associated with the fact that the current RCA license 
agreements expire in 1954 along with some of the cross- 
license agreements of 1932 and that RCA has fired its 
opening salvo in a rather bitter battle to convince the 
industry that it is necessary to have an RCA license in 
order to stay in business.” 

RCA shot back with a scathing statement reiterating 
that it “has consistently been first in every major color 
TV development.” As for McDonald, RCA. said, “We 
know of no significant contribution of Zenith to the 
creation and development of compatible color TV.” RCA 
went on to recall McDonald’s famous 1946 Collier's article 
in which he stated that TV is doomed unless it has a 
pay-as-you-look foundation and announced that Zenith 
wouldn’t make TV sets because they’d become obsolete. 
Then, RCA stated, “Although [Zenith] was the last major 
company to enter this new business, it has since that 
time made millions of dollars from it, using the inven- 
tions that RCA developed and made available to the 
entire industry.” 

Others joined Philco and Zenith. Admiral pres. Ross 
Siragusa told meeting of his distributors in Chicago: 
“The fact is, the so-called RCA system was flatly re- 
jected as unsatisfactory by the FCC in the fall of 1950. 
At that time, the Commission authorized the non-compati- 
ble Columbia system. The industry, which, except for 
CBS, was unanimously agreed that any color system 
adopted would have to be compatible, then stepped forward 
and developed the system the FCC has just approved.” 
He also said that RCA’s claims were aimed at strengthen- 
ing its patent position. 

In Los Angeles, Hoffman Radio Corp. placed full- 
page ads headed “A Salute to the Entire Television In- 
dustry,” describing development of compatible color as an 
all-industry effort. 

Another substantial manufacturer told us he considers 
protests of others to be based primarily on fear that RCA 
may gain a merchandising advantage, secondarily on 
plans of some to dispute RCA patents. 

And we have an interesting comment from Wayne 
Coy, who was chairman of FCC when it approved CBS 
system. Now pres, and 50% owner (with Time Inc.) 
of NBC-affiliated KOB-TV & KOB, Albuquerque, he 
wrote in response to our query: 

“The color TV decision by the FCC marks another 
era of progress for this great communications industry. 
It reflects great credit on the unified efforts of the indus- 
try under the leadership of Dr. W. R. G. Baker. Color 
is important to TV ; it will make TV an even more vital 
advertising and public service medium.” 



XARDA .session on color in Chicago’s Com-ad Hilton 
Hotel Jan. 12 (see p. 1) will feature follovnng subjects 
and speakers under chairmanship of RETMA exec. v.p. 
James D. Secrest: New FCC Signal, Its Nature & Per- 
formance — W. T. Wintringham, Bell Labs. Broadcasters’ 
Problems & Plans — Frank Marx, ABC; Richard Lewine, 
CBS-TV ; Ted Bergmann, DuMont; Barry Wood, NBC-TV. 
Color Receivers, Nature & Availability — W. O. Swinyard, 
Hazeltine; Service eft Installation Problems — Harold J. 
Schulman, DuMont. 



14 - 



Topics & Trends of TV Trade: Exuberant about color, 
cominced it’s going to come fast, the 2 newsmen who have 
color sets on loan in their homes have some pertinent sug- 
gestions for the trade as result of their observations. New 
York Times’ Jack Gould, after watching colorcast of NBC- 
TV’s Season’s Greetings Dec. 22 on Emerson set, com- 
mented that “gorgeous color TV, incredibly rich in tex- 
ture and gay in brilliance, truly came into existence last 
week,” then gave this advice : “For the TV manufacturers, 
the show presents a great lesson. They had better forget 
about leisurely transition to color. The switch to color 
TV very easily could assume stampede proportions.” 

Martin Rosenblum, Retailing Daily, with a Westing- 
house pilot model, cautions that careful tuning of set by 
retailers can make a world of different in proper presen- 
tation of color to public. He says dealer who tunes set 
well can show “all the richness and vibrance, all the 
added dimension that color provides, plus the feeling of 
excitement of a new electronic triumph.” But if the dealer 
neglects to tune set properly, he says, “color TV could be 
initially exposed to the consumer as a ghastly hodge-podge 
of hues, much like the result of a young child let loose 
with an artist’s palette.” Rosenblum sees possibility some 
dealers will purposely choose latter course to show color 
at its worst, in effort to build black-&-white sales. He said 
it was very easy to mistune a color set; he listed manufac- 
turer’s instructions on how to tune one properly. 

Illustrating zeal of retailers to get going on color. 
Sears, Roebuck says it will demonstrate its Silvertone 
color sets in its retail stores in all color telecasting areas 
by Feb. 1. And big Davega chain took ad in N. Y. news- 
papers Dec. 27 announcing it would start taking orders 
for color sets on “first-come-first-served-basis,” requiring 
$25 deposit to get on the list. Ad pointed out immediate 
limitations of color, urged public to buy monochome now. 
* ♦ * # 

Philco introduced 10 new models this week, 2 of them 
on Philco TV Playhouse Dec. 27 — and spokesman indicated 
7 more would be introduced soon. The models, all 21-in.: 
No. 4001E, mahogany plastic table $200, maroon $230, 
blonde $250; No. 4003, mahogany table $260; No. 4005, 
mahogany table $280, blonde $300; No. 4007, mahogany 
table $300, blonde $320; No. 4009, mahogany table $330; 
No. 4103, mahogany open-face console $280, blonde $300; 

No. 4105, mahogany open-face console $300, blonde $320; 

No. 4107, mahogany open-face console $330, blonde $350; 

No. 4112, mahogany open-face console $360, blonde $380; 

No. 4110, mahogany open-face console $400, blonde $420. 

V/cstinghouse’s new models: Ridgeton, 17-in. mahog- 
any plastic table $180; Rosemont, 17-in. ebony plastic table 
$190; Elmont, 21-in. mahogany veneer table $200; Dejas, 
21-in. metal table $240; Catalan and Sorrento, both 21-in. 
metal tables at $260; Engleton, 21-in. mahogany open- 
face console $300, frosted oak $310; Pemberton, 27-in. 
frosted oak table $500; Westfort, 21-in. mahogany or 
walnut combination $600. Optional uhf equipment is $40 
extra on all models. 

Emerson’s new models, all tables: No. 1012, 17-in. 
mahogany wood $150; No. 1000, 21-in. mahogany wood 
$180; No. 1002, 21-in. mahogany wood $200; No. 1004, 
21-in. walnut $220; No. 1006, 21-in. maple $230; No. 1008, 
21-in. blonde $230; No. 1010, 21-in. limed oak $230. Op- 
tional uhf equipment is $30 extra on 17-in. set, $50 on 
all others. 

GE’s price reductions on 5 models in current line: 
17-in. mahogany plastic table $180 (reduced from $190); 
21-in. ebony plastic table $200 ($240); 21-in. mahogany 
plastic table $220 ($260); 21-in. mahogany plastic table 
with aluminized tube $250 ($290); 21-in. mahogany plastic 
open-face console $280 ($300). 



Sylvania will appeal initial decision by Federal Trade 
Commission examiner last week ordering it to halt “dis- 
criminatory pricing practices” in sale of radio receiving 
tubes (Vol. 9:52). Arthur L. B. Richardson, Sylvania gen. 
counsel, said appeal will contend Robinson-Patman amend- 
ment to Clayton Anti-Trust Act permits varying prices 
to diffei'ent customers “where differences are justified by 
differences in cost of manufacturing, sale or delivery.” 
Case was outgrowth of complaint that Sylvania in 1949 
sold radio tubes to Philco at 7-9<f less than to its own 
distributors. 

TV set sales by Canadian factories totaled 313,633 in 
first 11 months, at average price of $410, compared to 
production of 362,570, reports Canadian RTMA. Projected 
production estimate is that 154,901 more sets will be 
turned out next 3 months. For Nov. alone, sales were 
55,188, inventory 55,291 at month’s end. Quebec led in 
sales with 19,270; Toronto second, 12,938; other Ontario, 
6514; Ottawa & eastern Ontario, 6109; Hamilton-Niagara, 
5073; Windsor, 3062; British Columbia, 1929; Maritime 
Provinces, 203; Prairies, 90. 

TV-radio dealers don’t like proposal of Washington 
(D. C.) supt. of licenses to classify and regulate all 
retailers who accept trade-ins as second-hand dealers. 
Under proposal, all merchants who accept trade-ins as 
partial payment on new merchandise would be required 
to pay yearly $50 second-hand license fee, be fingerprinted 
by police, report all details of trade-in to police and hold 
merchandise for 15 days without altering or recondition- 
ing it. 

Channel Master Corp. has opened new $1,500,000 TV 
antenna plant in Ellenville, N. Y. With 115,000 sq. ft. of 
floor space, it has 6 assembly lines to supplement the 2 in 
old Ellenville plant, as well as complete aluminum extrus- 
sion and tube mill, claimed to be only one of its kind in 
antenna industry. Company now has nearly 1000 em- 
ployes, having started with 6 in 1947. 

Mexico has raised import duties on TV & radio receiv- 
ei's, effective Dec. 15: TVs & radios with cabinet, new 
rate 5 pesos per legal kilogram, 30% ad valorem, up from 
2 & 20%; without cabinet, TVs 2 & 20% from 1.20 & 10%, 
radios 2 & 20% from 1.20 & 15%; TV combinations, 5 & 
30% from 2 & 25%. 

Freed Electronics & Controls Corp., now out of TV 
production, is entering high fidelity market ^vith line of 
Freed-Eisemann AM-FM tuners, pre-amplifiers and other 
components. 



Next TV Factbook — Pre-Print Orders 

Our semi-annual TV Facthook No. 18 will be off 
the presses shortly after Jan. 15, 1954 — containing 
basic data on all U. S., Canadian and Mexican border 
stations & networks (including rates) ; complete 
tabulation of applications for new stations, detail- 
ing principals involved, facilities requested, etc. 
(and starting new series of weekly Addenda) ; list 
of all new-station grantees (with reported starting 
dates) ; directories of station representatives and 
major advertising agencies; directories of TV set & 
tube manufacturers, transmitter & studio equipment 
makers, film & live program suppliers, community 
antenna systems, theatres equipped for TV, FCC 
personnel, legal & engineering consultants, elec- 
tronics laboratories; plus many other reference fea- 
tures. One copy goes to each full-service subscriber. 
Extra copies, if pre-print orders for 20 or more are 
placed by Jan. 17, cost $1.50 each; single copies, $3. 




15 



Eledronics Reports: Vital statistics of TV-radio-elec- 
tronics in 1953 as sized up by Dr. 0. H. Caldwell in 
January issue of Tele-Tech. Total output of industry v/as 
worth well over $5 billion, with more than $3 billion for 
military production. America’s “annual bill” for TV-radio 
came to $5.35 billion, including $900,000,000 in broadcast- 
ers’ time sales, $140,000,000 in talent costs, $550,000,000 
in electricity & batteries to operate TV-radio sets (includ- 
ing $250,000,000 to power home TV receivers alone). Dr. 
Caldwell estimates $1,675 billion as retail cost of TVs sold 
during year, $536,000,000 for radios at retail, $250,000,000 
for phono records, $1.3 billion for TV-radio repairs and 
costs. TV & radio sets in world are estimated at 263,000,000. 

Color TV will dominate TV-radio papers at AIEE 
winter convention Jan. 18-22 at New York’s Statler Hotel. 
Program includes papers on differential gain & phase 
measurements in color TV systems, by Bell Labs’ H. 
Kelly; photo-electric colorimeter for color TV, by Philco’s 
J. B. Chatten; transmission of color over intercity net- 
works, by AT&T’s J. A. Rae; color camera equipment, 
by RCA’s F. W. Millspaugh; color broadcast equipment, 
by Telechrome’s J. R. Popkin-Clurman; color studio de- 
sign, by NBC’s R. Montford; color broadcast equipment, 
by O. W. B. Reed Jr. of Jansky & Bailey; high-gain 
side-firing uhf broadcast antennas, by Cornell’s H. G. 
Smith; wavestack vhf antennas, by Canadian RCA’s G. B. 
MacKimmie; klystron uhf transmitter, by DuMont’s W. H. 
Sayer; TV satellites, by WSM-TV’s L. E. Rawls; commu- 
nity TV systems, by M. F. Malarkey, Pottsville Trans- 
Video Corp. 

“TV-Eye,” RCA’s new closed-circuit industrial TV 
system, is now in full production and on display by elec- 
tronic parts distributors throughout country. Sampling 
of all outlets has been completed, reports RCA. Suggested 
retail price for TV Eye system is $995. Available as ac- 
cessories are 4 new lenses priced from $88.95 to $130. New 
York parts distributor Terminal Radio Corp., one of first 
to list TV Eye equipment in its catalog, quotes these 
prices: Camera & control unit, less vidicon tube, $635; 
vidicon tube $345. 

Westinghouse has appointed Latham E. Osborne as 
v.p. in charge of all company divisions and member of 
board. Leslie E. Lynde, v.p. in charge of aviation gas tur- 
bine div., succeeds him as v.p. in charge of defense prod- 
ucts, including output of Baltimore electronics div. Both 
will headquarter in Pittsburgh. 

I-T-E Circuit Breaker Co., Philadelphia, acquires con- 
trolling interest in Chase-Shawmut Co., Newburyport, 
Mass., fuse manufacturer. It recently bought Victor Insu- 
lators Inc., Victor, N. Y. 

Sightmaster Corp. has acquired General Fuse Co., 
South River, N. J., will begin in Jan. to manufacture its 
line of electronic, automotive, industrial and household 
fuses at New Rochelle plant. 

RCA Victor Co. Ltd. will open new 50,000-sq. ft. 
record-pressing plant about Jan. 31 at Smith Falls, Ont. 
L. I. DelMotte will be mgr. Recording studios remain in 
Montreal. 

Dr. James L. Thomas, former chief of resistance meas- 
ui-ement section, National Bureau of Standards, named 
chief of new resi.stance & reactance section of Bureau’s 
electricity div. 

Sylvania issues revised TV picture tube comparison 
wall chart, listing over 160 types and diagrams; it’s avail- 
able free from adv. distribution dept., 1100 Main St., 
Buffalo. 

Wel)s(er-< hieago leases new eily-buill 35,000-r:q. f I . 
Iiranch a.s.sembly plant in New IJlm, Minn., starting in 
spring, for motor assembly, tape recorders & phonograi>hs. 



Financial & Trade Notes: It’s estimated about 300,000 
tape recorders will have been sold in 1953, as against 
some 200,000 in 1952 and 175,000 in 1951. This evidence 
of growing demand, plus RCA’s recent demonstration of 
both black-&-white and color TV via magnetic tape (Vol. 
9:49), leads United Business Service, Boston, to com- 
ment, “This is an industry to watch.” It states: 

“Beneficiaries of the development of magnetic tape 
fall into several groups. Among the few companies which 
produce the tape, Minnesota Mining & Mfg. has a dominant 
position and should do well as demand grows. In the 
field of tape recorders, Webster-Chicago leads. This com- 
pany also produces complete photographs and record 
changers for installation in cabinets. Radio Corp. has 
entered the business with a big promotion of its portable 
model. Federal Mfg. & Engineering is another company 
which has entered this promising field. Other growing 
‘tape’ participants are Audio Devices, Audio & Video 
Recording and Magnecord. Altogether, there are about 
40 companies which manufacture machines, produce tape, 
or engage in other phases of the business.” 

* * * 

Admiral’s 1953 sales will set all-time record of about 
$250,000,000, said pres. Ross Siragusa at distributors con- 
vention in Chicago this week, adding that appliance sales 
for first 11 months this year were 37% above all of 1952. 
Admiral’s previous high was 1950, when sales were $230,- 
397,661, earnings $18,767,554 ($9.73 a share). Sales last 
year were $190,724,356 vs. 1951’s $185,925,058; earnings 
last year were $8,711,133 ($4.43) vs. 1951’s $9,586,833 
($4.88). Admiral’s last financial report this year showed 
9-month earnings of $6,564,848 ($3.34) on record sales of 
$189,856,035 (Vol. 9:44). 

Sylvania’s 1953 sales hit all-time high of about $295,- 
000,000, some 25% over 1952’s $235,000,000, said pres. 
H. Ward Zimmer in year-end statement. Each of com- 
pany’s 7 operating divisions’ sales exceeded 1952. De- 
fense business in 1953 was 22% of total, against 30% 
in 1952, backlog of unfilled defense orders totaling $90,000,- 
000 vs. $85,000,000 at end of 1952. Sales of Sylvania 
receiving tubes reached all-time high, nearly 30% over 
1952, while picture tube sales were 40% higher. 

Philco finalized stock e.xchange plan this week, whereby 
it acquires Dexter Co., Fairfield, la., washing machine 
manufacturer (Vol. 9:50). It exchanges 70,000 shares of 
authorized but unissued Philco stock for 200,000 shares 
of Dexter stock outstanding, paying 5% stock dividend 
to Dexter stockholders. Transfer is expected to be com- 
pleted by Feb. 15. 

DuMont sales for first 11 months of 1953 were 20% 
higher than comparable 1952 period, and “it is anticipated 
that profits for the full year will exceed those of 1952,” 
said Dr. Allen B. DuMont in year-end statement. 

Cornell-Dubilier reports record sales of $43,630,816 
for fiscal year ended Sept. 30, some 23% over preceding 
year’s $35,496,041. Net income was $1,666,696 ($3.12 a 
share), compared with $1,539,831 ($2.86) for 1952. 

Oak Mfg. Co. reports sales of $15,602,236, net income 
of $970,168 ($1.85 a share) for first 9 months of 1953, 
compared with $11,013,071 & $745,117 ($1.42) same 1952 
period. 



High-fidelity boom is getting under way in Latin 
America and market comparable to U. S. should be fully 
developed there in 2 or 3 years. That’s observation of 
R. L. Romeyn, Philco International v.p., on return from 
tour in which ho heard “hi-fi” concerts in Puerto Rico, 
Colombia, Venezuela, Chile, .\rgentina, Peru, Panama, 
Cuba. 



16 - 



Network TV-Badio Billings 

Norembcr 1953 and .lanuary-Xovember 1953 
(For October report see Television Digest, Vol. 9:48) 



B oth November and ll-month leads in network TV 
billings were taken by CBS-TV in Publishers Infor- 
mation Bureau tabulations released this w'eek, and as 
usual CBS maintained its far-away lead in network radio 
billings. CBS went to Nov. TV record of $9,778,028, lead- 
ing for 6th time this year, and shows total of $87,106,365 
for 11 months. NBC dipped from its $10,275,480 record 
of Oct. to $9,665,078 in Nov. to bring its ll-month total to 
$86,615,046. Both ABC and DuMont went to new highs in 
Nov., when total for all networks reached record $23,630,- 
290 to bring ll-month cumulative total to $202,969,531. 

Radio billings held firm, aggregating $13,670,115 in 
Nov. vs. $14,477,570 in Nov. 1952, or $146,326,032 for the 
11 months vs. $148,528,367 for same 1952 months. The 
complete PIB report; 



NETWORK TELEVISION 



ORS 


November 

1953 

$ 9.778.028 


November 

1952 

$ 6,654,812 


Jan. -Nov. 
1953 

$ 87,106,365 


Jan. -Nov. 
1952 

$ 61,970,042 


KRC 


.. . 9,665,078 


8,026,017 


86,615,046 


75,411,767 


ARC 


2.396.203 


1,396,999 


18,490,818 


17,021,415 




1,790,981 


1,026,566 


10,757,302 


8,929,340 




S23.630.290 


$17,104,394 


$202,969,531 


$163,332,564 


rps 


NETWORK RADIO 

S .5.409.246 $ 5.506.172 


$ 56,823,861 


$ 53,793,409 


VRr 


3.372.330 


4,138,979 


41,517,433 


43,556,850 


ARC 


2,798,532 


2,659,934 


26,953,930 


32,166,319 


MBS 


.. . 2,090,007 


2,172,485 


21,030,808 


19,011,789 


Total 


.. $13,670,115 


$14,477,570 


$146,326,032 


$148,528,367 



NETWORK TELEVISION — January-November 1953 



ABC 



CBS 



DuMont 



NBC 



Total 



Jan. . 


$ 1,604,892 


$ 7,083,619 ; 


$ 982,794 


$ 7,604,638 


$ 17,275,943 


Feb. 


. 1,481,032 


6,621,629 


862,299 


6,376,029 


15,840,989 


Mar. 


. 1,728,446 


7,739,812 


1,054,857 


7,998,131 


18,521,246 


Apr. 


_ 1,640,597 


7,770,181 


850,658* 


7,513,430 


17,774,866* 




. 1,813,985 


7,622,432 


903,945* 


8,052,545 


18,392,907* 


June 


.. i;607,320 


7,399,078 


835,768* 


7,324,315 


17,166,481* 




_ 1,299,471 


7,422,337 


592,890* 


6,903,092 


16,217,790* 


Aug. 


, 1,244,993 


7,783,813 


742,665* 


6,564,841 


16,336,312* 


Sept. . 


. 1,376,017 


8,503,620 


678,302* 


7,837,467* 


18,395,406* 


Oct. 


. 2,297,862 


9,381,816* 


1,462,143* 


10,275,480* 


23,417,301* 


Nov 


. 2,396,203 


9,778,028 


1,790,981 


9,665,078 


23,630,290 


Total 


$18,490,818 


$87,106,365 : 


$10,757,302 


$86,615,046 


$202,969,531 



NETWORK RADIO— January-November 1953 





ABC 


CBS 


MBS 


NBC 


Total 


Jan. 


.. $ 2,674,622 


$ 5,156,404 


$ 1,736,134 


$ 4,280,555 


$ 13,877,715 


Feb. 


, 2,538,663 


4,670,089 


1,638,075 


3,813,602 


12,660,429 


Mar. 


2,797,544 


5,526,360 


1,995,478 


4,342,082 


14,661,464 


Apr. 


_ 2,637,364 


5,375,243 


2,008,990 


4,196,009 


14,217,606 


May 


2,593,923 


5,333,481 


2,038,210 


4,141,070 


14,106,684 


June 


2,113,725 


5,226,096 


1,926,865 


3,979,471 


13,246,157 


July 


.... 2,030,989 


4,869,719 


1,830,467 


3,494,330 


12,225,505 


Aug. 


.... 1,958,683 


4,790,114 


1,738,248 


3,219,250 


11,706,295 


Sept. 


... 2,156,806 


4,989,398* 


1,792,736 


3,205,675 


12,144,615* 


Oct. 


2,653,079 


5,477,711 


2,185,598* 


3,493,059* 


13,809,447* 


Nov. 


2,798,532 


5,409,246 


2,090,007 


3,372,330 


13,670,115 


Total $26,953,930 


$56,823,861 


$21,030,808 


$41,517,433 


$146,326,032 



•Revised as of Dec. 29, 1953. 

Note: These figures do not represent actual revenues to the net- 
works, which do not divulge their actual net dollar Incomes. 
They’re compiled by PIB on basis of one-time network rates, or 
before frequency or cash discounts. Therefore, In terms of dollars 
actually paid to networks they may be inflated by as much as 40%. 
Figures are accepted by networks themselves, however, and by the 
Industry generally, as satisfactory Index for comparisons & trends. 



Reflecting stockholder awareness of value of run-out 
feature films still locked in major film companies’ vaults — 
a value some think is diminishing in direct ratio to speed 
of advent of color TV — was question raised by stockholder 
Lester P. Martin at Columbia Picture Co.’s annual meet- 
ing Dec. 21. He suggested directors set up a separate 
corporation to which Columbia’s old film inventory would 
be assigned, stock to be distributed among shareholders. 
It would be profitable tax-wise, he said, eliciting promise 
idea would be studied. Columbia reported June 30 first 
quarter gross of $18,000,000, with earnings of $1.01, said 
second quarter would top $20,000,000 with better net. 



Combined AM-FM broadcasting income in 1952 was 
$60,100,000 before Federal income taxes, up 4.5% over 
1951, says FCC in final financial report issued Dec. 31 
(Public Notice 99911). Total revenues were $469,700,000, 
up 4.3%, and total expenses $409,600,000, up 4.57c. Pre- 
liminary report last May (Vol. 9:18) had given total 
broadcasting revenues as $473,100,000, income before Fed- 
eral taxes of $62,600,000. Report shows the 4 national and 
3 largest regional networks accounted for $100,600,000 of 
the 1952 total. It breaks down revenue-expense figures by 
cities, community sizes, classes of stations, etc., shows 611 
FM stations accounted for $2,600,000 in revenues. Com- 
parisons with previously-announced TV figures are also 
provided — TV in 1952 totaling $324,200,000 revenues, up 
37.5% from 1951, and $55,500,000 income before Federal 
taxes, up 33.57c. (For breakdowns of both the TV & radio 
figures by years, see p. 351, TV Factbook No. 17.) 

J. Walter Thompson Co. has updated to Sept. 1, 1953 
its report on Where the TV Sets Are, tabulating house- 
holds and TV ownership in the first 312 markets of the 
U. S. (Census Bureau divisions). Last report, dated 
April 1, 1953, was published in full in our TV Factbook 
No. 17 oi July 1953 (pp. 341-449). The Sept. 1 figures 
are interim, prepared largely to meet intra-company and 
client requests, and will be updated to Jan. 1, 1954 some- 
time in Feb. We are not publishing the Sept. 1 report, 
preferring to wait for the Jan. 1, but limited supply of 
mimeographed copies will be made available to subscribers 
on request. 

Intensity of popular interest in color is also mani- 
fested in 1%-p. color layout in current Life Magazine, 
captioned “Upheaval, Markets to Come for a Still Infant 
Industry, Color Television” and showing diagramatically 
how the RCA and CBS color TV camera methods work. 
“Because color will bring confusion, too-quick obsolescence 
of black-&-white sets and financial hardships,” states 
Life, “sections of the TV industry have been reluctant 
revolutionaries. The introduction of color, nevertheless, 
is another example of the way U. S. industry finds — or 
is thrust into — new, profitable fields even before old ones 
are played out.” 

Two applications for new TV stations were filed with 
FCC this week. With 4 dismissals, pending applications 
were reduced to 347 (71 uhf). Week’s applications were 
for Paducah, Ky., Ch. 6, by Paducah Newspapers Inc. 
(Paducah Sun-Democrat) ; for Selma, Ala., Ch. 8, by Dallas 
Bcstrs. Inc. (Oscar P. Covington, pres.), whose principals 
own WCOV-TV & WCOV, Montgomery, and WGWD 
(AM), Gadsden, Ala. [For further details about these 
applications, see TV Addenda 17 -Z herewith; for complete 
listings of all grants, new stations, applications, dismissals, 
hearings, etc., see TV Factbook No. 17 & Addenda to date.] 

Year ended with 261 interconnected stations in 161 
cities, AT&T having added these stations between Xmas 
week end and New Year’s Eve: KOA-TV, Denver; WROL- 
TV & WTSK-TV, Knoxville, Tenn.; WOSH-TV, Oshkosh, 
Wis.; WSTV-TV, Steubenville, 0.; WLBT, Jackson, Miss.; 
WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge, La.; KCMC-TV, Texarkana, 
Tex.; WNCT, Greenville, N. C. Slated for interconnec- 
tion New Year’s Day were WKNX-TV, Saginaw, Mich.; 
KSLA, Shreveport, La.; WAYS-TV, Charlotte, N. C. ; 
KFAZ, Monroe, La.; WLBC-TV, Muncie, Ind. 

Sale of radio WGAR, Cleveland, to Peoples Broad- 
casting Corp., subsidiary of Farm Bureau Mutual Insur- 
ance Co., Columbus (Vol. 9:50), was approved by FCC 
this week. Sellers were Mrs. Francis S. Parker, widow 
of late George A. Richards, and 13 others. Purchase price 
was $1,750,000, which included about $750,000 in quick 
assets. WGAR pres. John F. Patt, who sold his 35%> 
interest, becomes head of WJR, Detroit. 




MARTIN CODEL’s 

AUTHORITATIVE NEWS SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



I — ' (A 

with Electronics Ir Reports 




PUBIISHEO WEEKL* * BE RADIO NEWS BBREAO • WTATI BLOG. • WASHINGTON S,0.C.> TELEPHONE STERUNG 3-17S5 • VOL. 10; No. 2 



In this 
issue: 




19 & 21-in. Color Tubes 
Storer Buys Empire Coil Co. for $10,000,000, page 3 
One New Starter, One CP in Slow Week, page 4 
Newspaper & Theatre Folk Lead Ownership, page 5 
Nearly 300 Community Antenna Systems, page 5 



JAN 1 1 

smitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 3 
Estimated 1953 Production — 7,261,109, page 9 
Dealers Confident After Seeing Color, page 9 
Color Gains Impetus on All Fronts, page II 
Battle Over Color "Contributions" Continues, page II 



19 & 21-in. COLOR TUBES NOT FAR OFF: A_vi tal purpose is being served by 15-in. round 

color tube — that of giving set production a start — but it is expected to sur- 
vive very little longer than it takes to get into production of larger tubes. 



That's the definite consensus of tube and set makers as we talked to them 

this week in our continuing survey of color tube prospects. Relying heavily on 
black-&-white experience, manufacturers say there's no doubt that the 15-in. (giving 
ll}4-in. picture) is too small and that the industry will bend every effort to reach 
goal of the 21-in. rectangular for which public has shown heavy preference. 

It's conceivable color may not parallel monochrome . Public may be satisfied 
with smaller picture in color — but we doubt it, after seeing 17-in. & 19-in. color 
pictures. Obviously, there's no way of knowing until customers have opportunity to 
compare sizes, quality and prices. 

At least one interim step is currently in prospect before 21-in . is built — 
the 19-in. round , giving about 17-in. picture. This step may be reached quite soon. 
After announcing that price of recently-commercialized 15-in . (Vol. 10:1) will be 
$175 to manufacturers , RCA this week invited tube licensees to see the 19-in. at 
RCA Labs in Princeton Jan. 21. This is taken to mean design of 19-in. is frozen. 



The 19-in. won't be in mass production until fall, RCA says, but speculation 
is that pilot production is already under way. 



* * * * 



Further indication of tube trends comes from bulb maker Corning Glass . Its 
pres. Wm. C. Decker tells us Corning is working on 5 sizes for the RCA-type tube: 
15-in. & 19-in. round and 21-in. rectangular . He said Corning is now building up 
inventory of 15-in. , can step up current pilot production of either 15-in. or 19-in. 
and "make as many as anyone wants whenever we get orders for them. " 

The 21-in. bulb is still in laboratory stage but may be put into pilot pro- 
duction during first half of this year, says Decker, pointing out that it's hard to 
pin down production estimates while tube is still in process of development. 

CBS-Hytron chairman Lloyd Coffin said he believes 19-in. will be next step , 
"and that will be determined by when we can get the bulbs." Hytron has set $125 
price on its 15-in. round, is slated to begin pilot production late this month, and 
regular production in February. 

Dr. Allen B. DuMont , pioneer of large black-&-white tubes, who has hitherto 
been silent on plans for color tubes and sets, says he'll produce no 15-in. sets 
except for demonstration. "We're developing our own type of color tube," he said, 
adding that he's shooting for "something in the neighborhood of 21-in .." hopes to 
have it by mid-year . "Unquestionably," he said, "it's the only satisfactory size." 

While set makers showed only 15-in . at this week's mid-winter marts in Chi- 
cago (see p. 9), it's evident that some of them plan little more than token produc- 
tion of that size — they're all shooting for big screens. 



COPYRIGHT 1954 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



Chromatic TV Labs , developer of Lawrence tube, has always plumped for big 
tubes. Chromatic licensees currently are waiting for rectangular glass envelopes, 
as well as tube grids. Pres. Richard Hodgson says that so far blanks for Chromatic 
sample tubes have been round metal, 21-in. and 24-in . , with cones supplied by I-T-E 
Circuit Breaker and United Specialties Co. He expects that rectangular glass bulbs 
will pose no big problems for Chromatic one-gun tubes because they're similar to 
those used for black-&-white , except for addition of metal flange. 

Chromatic announced this week it has set up grid-producing facilities at 
Emeryville, Cal . — "to get our licensees off the ground." Company has been making 
grids in pilot plant at Oakland, but new plant, employing 200, is aiming to be in 
production by end of March with initial annual rate of 25,000 grids for as many 
tubes. (Parenthetically, we'd say that rate appears incredibly small.) 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

We visited Hazeltine Labs this week , to observe its results with Lawrence 
tube. Hazeltine has devised technique whereby tube itself acts as signal decoder , 
a process it believes has distinct advantages. 

Results are a definitely marketable picture . Tube was displayed alongside 
15-in. RCA-type tube produced by Zenith subsidiary Rauland ; latter differed from 
RCA tube in that it contains 1,200,000 phosphor dots, compared with RCA's 600,000. 

Demonstration was conducted for Hazeltine licensees by research v.p. Arthur 
V. Loughren, who gave frank appraisal of Lawrence tube's advantages and drawbacks. 
He stated these to be the advantages ; (1) Larger picture , with no complications ex- 
pected with still bigger tubes. (2) No registration or convergence problems. 

(3) Simplicity of production and low rejection rate. (4) Ruggedness in handling 
and in continuous use. (5) Good black-&-white reception. 

Loughren noted 2 disadvantages , both of which he believes are temporary; 

(1) Less color fidelity and overall resolution. (2) Excessive radiation — "it's a 
50-watt transmitter." 

Cause of poorer color fidelity , Loughren explained, is that the tube has 350 
lines of green phosphor, 175 of red, 175 of blue. Thus, when solid red or blue ob- 
ject is shown, it has far less resolution than solid green object. Result is that 
red or blue objects look coarser and paler. Solution to this, Loughren said, is to 
put more lines in picture. Chromatic's Hodgson claims that tubes now under devel- 
ment will give all the resolution transmitted. 

Radiation problem is on way to elimination , Loughren stated. He said Hazel- 
tine engineers have worked on disassembled tube, devised very promising techniques 
for reducing radiation to reasonable limits. He added that complete tube incorpo- 
rating new techniques is still to be produced. 

Our own observation is that lack of misregistration is certainly a plus for 
Lawrence tube, compared with Rauland tube which had bad fringing at top and bottom. 
We must note, however, that we've seen no misregistration on RCA tubes in recent 
months. Black-&-white reception on Lawrence tube was excellent — a fact not to be 
dismissed lightly until most telecasting is in color, if it will be. Rauland tube 
was marred by fringing during black-&-white reception. 

Westinghouse appears quite sold on Lawrence tube , is reported further along 
towards production than anyone else. Engineer for one small manufacturer, attending 
Hazeltine session, said Westinghouse told him production "yield" of Lawrence tubes 
is 30-to-l greater than RCA type — difference in rejection rate being that great. 

One drawback of tube isn't technical ; it's fact there's no big source of 
supply in sight. Chromatic Labs doesn't make tubes. Of Chromatic's 2 licensees, 
Crosley intends to use all its own output and Thomas Electronics is a small pro- 
ducer. Westinghouse hasn't been a big factor in tube production. However, there 
is persistent rumor that ^ is working fiercely on Lawrence tube or a grid-type 
tube of some sort. If GE commits its massive productive facilities to the tube, 
large-scale production can be expected eventually. 

Regarding Rauland tube , incidentally, it's worth noting that its 1,200,000 
dots, compared with RCA's 600,000, give picture exceptionally fine texture . We sat 



- 3 - 

within 3 ft. of set, detected no dots at all. If the production of such screens is 
practical, it's certainly worth doing. 

Evaluating whole color tube situation , one executive said; "The j\imp from 
radio to black-&-white TV was a much greater revolution in our business than will 
be the jump from black-&-white to color." 

He sees no need for the intermediate steps taken by monochrome — no such 
evolution as the progression through 7, SVz, 10, 12, 12}^, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 

21, 24, 27 & 30-in. sizes. However, the more conservative industry sources expect 
it will be some 2 years before mass production of rectangular 21-in . — the "ideal". 

Though there have been some pilot model metal-coned color tubes, virtually 
everyone is talking glass now . Interesting sidelight is that RCA, pioneer of metal 
tubes for black-&-white , gave them up about 6 months ago, and except for replace- 
ment is now making only glass black-&-white (as well as color). 

STORER BUYS EMPIRE COIL CO. FOR $10,000,000: Biggest deal since the ABC-UPT merger — 

topping any of the 20 major station sales of 1953 — is Storer Broadcasting Co.'s 
projected purchase of Herbert Mayer's Empire Coil Co. for approximately $10,000,000. 

Annoimced purchase price is $8,500,000 , same sum Westinghouse paid Philco 
for WPTZ in Philadelphia last year (Vol. 9 ;8, 22) ; but Storer assumes liabilities of 
about $1,000,000 and Mayer will get about $500,000 more in adjustments. 

Deal embraces acquisition of big electronic parts manufacturer, major vendor 
of transformers & coils to many of the large TV-radio manufacturers, plus its TV 
stations WXEL, Cleveland (Ch. 8) and KPTV, Portland. Ore . (Ch. 27). It was closed at 
4:16 a.m. Jan. 8, when Storer counsel John Poole and Mayer counsel Morton Wilner 
completed the agreement papers, and $350,000 cash deposit was paid. 

Agreement calls for $6.000,000 cash on FCC approval of transfers, balance in 
cash or notes — most likely cash. Broker Howard Stark , who engineered deal, is 
paid by Storer. No new stock sales are contemplated to raise funds. 

Mr. Mayer gave ill health as one of reasons for finally agreeing to sell 
after having rejected numerous offers, particularly for Cleveland station. Package 
deal offered certain tax advantages . Letter to staffs of WXEL & KPTV told them 
Storer has assured him he anticipates making no changes in personnel and that opera- 
tion of the stations will continue substantially as before. 

* ♦ * ♦ 

There was no breakdown in values placed on the 3 properties, all of which 
are known to be substantial money makers , together last year grossing very nearly 
the amount of the announced purchase price. Cleveland station has been particu- 
larly profitable; Mayer has rejected offers of up to $5,000,000 for it. 

Portland uhf station , which he also founded, was first commercial uhf outlet 
to go on the air, has NBC basic affiliation, has been good earner from start , is 
probably the most profitable uhf station of all the 122 that have since started. 

Already owner of 5 stations , the hitherto allowable limit, Storer will have 
to d ispose of at least one of them. Presumably it will be KGBS-TV, San Antonio (Ch. 
5), recently known as KEYL, which he purchased in 1951 for $1,050,000 (Vol. 7 ;30,41) 
and which son George B. Storer Jr. now manages. Or it might be WAGA-TV. Atlanta (Ch. 5). 

Because FCC is waiving 5-limit rule to permit ownership of 2 uhf in addition 
to 5 vhf (Vol. 9:51), it's expected there will be no obstacle to ownership of Port - 
land outlet which is often cited as the " showcase" of what uhf can accomplish, both 
technically and financially, if it gets a good head start. FCC is deeply committed 
to success of uhf, which many think requires network and other big-interest backing 
over long haul. That was why it authorized, within 48 hours of application, the 
transfer to DuMont Network Jan. 1 of Empire Coil's uhf KCTY, Kansas City (Vol. 9:52). 

* ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Now 46 years old , Herbert Mayer quit his New York law practice in 1944 to set 
up Empire Coil Co. with an investment of only $5000 and an assembly line in a loft 
in New Rochelle, N.Y. , where it now has a modern building. He wanted to get into 
electronics somehow, so boned up on what was most needed — deciding on components. 

Before the TV station freeze , he decided he wanted to go into telecasting. 



- 4 - 



and in Dec. 1949 he founded WXEL while local interests were still dubious about TV. 
In Sept. 1952, he astounded the industry by getting KPTV on the air in TV-less Port- 
land as the first commercial uhf in theU.S., buying the RCA-NBC experimental trans- 
mitter at Bridgeport, Conn, and getting it going in record time (Vol. 8:38). 

He started KCTY, Kansas City (Ch. 25) last June, anticipating that vhf would 
be tied up in competitive hearings and its addition to the city's one vhf outlet 
thus slowed down. But merger agreements approved by FCC brought 2 more vhf into 
being in short order, they grabbed off CBS and ABC, and his station did poorly . He 
reported investment and losses of $750,000 in the 7 months of operation before KCTY 
was sold to DuMont for a nominal |1 as of Jan. 1, 1954 (Vol. 10:1). 

Mayer's uhf grants for Denver and Indianapolis were also surrendered — in 
Denver because 4 vhf got going first and in Indianapolis because of likelihood new 
vhf will get on the air, too, before uhf could get a good start. 

Agreement with Storer precludes return to same fields in same cities, but 
Mayer hopes to enter the theatrical side of the business — may become a producer or 
syndicator of programs and may back a Broadway play. His long-cherished ambition 
has been playwriting and play producing. 

♦ * ♦ ♦ 

Storer may set up a separate industrial operating unit , for it also owns 
Standard Tube Co., Detroit (sheet metal tubes). It was from that business that Mr. 
Storer ventured forth into radio broadcasting about 20 years ago, building slowly 
to ownership (by founding or purchasing) 5 TV stations, each with an AM adjunct, 
plus AM stations in his base city of Miami and in Wheeling, W.Va. He also owns a 
TV in Havana, which does not fall within FCC jurisdiction, and publishes the Miami 
Beach Florida Sun, a 5-days-a-week newspaper (Vol. 9:45). 

Storer Broadcasting Co . is now partly owned publicly as result of the recent 
offering of 200,000 shares of common (at 14) which was quickly oversubscribed (Vol. 
9:45,47). All 15,000 shares of 7% cumulative preferred stock, except for ^50,000 
worth held by v.p. J. Harold Ryan, a brother-in-law, was purchased by the Jefferson 
Standard Life Insurance Co. for $1,450,000. 

Prospectus filed with SEC last Nov. 17 showed funded debt of $5,133,000, with 
1,010,000 shares of common outstanding, of which 843,250 were designated as "B" com- 
mon. Storer' s personal holdings of 640,125 shares of the "B", even without the 
large block held in trust for his family, give him voting control. For the recent 
stock issue, Mrs. Ryan sold 102,500 shares, Mr. Ryan 63,125 and Mr. Storer 34,375. 
The Ryans still hold 50,000 shares each. 

♦ No * * 

Note : There were 20 major TV station transfers authorized in 1953 (see TV 
Factbook No. 18). Storer was involved in only one of them — $2,400,000 purchase 
of WBRC-TV & WBRC, Birmingham, Ala. (Vol. 9:13,21). Storer also bought radio KABC, 
San Antonio (now KGBS) for $700,000 in order to have an AM counterpart for TV there. 

There were rumors this week that the Washington Post is about to buy out 
CBS's 45% interest in WTOP-TV & WTOP , having jointly acquired the TV station in 1950 
from Macy interests for $1,400,000. Though denied, it's believed only matter of 
time before CBS sells so as to free itself to acquire 100% ownership elsewhere. The 
Post owns outright WMBR-TV & WMBR, Jacksonville, purchased in 1952 for $2,470,000. 

ONE NEW STARTER, ONE CP IN SLOW WEEK: New year's first week brought only one new 

station on air and one TV grant by FCC. Starter is WBTM-TV, Danville, Va . (Ch. 24) ; 
CP went to Coastal Bend TV Co. for Corpus Christi, Tex ., Ch. 22. 

Danville station started Jan. 6 , is 42 mi. northeast of vhf-served Greens- 
boro, N.C., 59 mi. south of vhf-served Lynchburg, Va. RCA-equipped, it's owned by 
local group headed by broadcaster L.N. Dibrell , managed by Edward Gardner , hopes to 
interconnect with ABC by April, has $200 base rate, is represented by Hollingbery. 

Several other stations were reported poised for possible week-end starts. 
Second klystron and RCA antenna got to WMGT, Adams, Mass . (Ch. 74) on Jan. 6, so it 
should start momentarily with its GE transmitter. Also possibilities over week end 
are WKAR-TV, E. Lansing. Mich . (Ch. 60), GE-equipped, and WEAR-TV, Pensacola (Ch. 3), 



5 



RCA-equipped. And from CBC came word that CBMT, Montreal (Ch. 6) definitely would 
get started Jan. 10 — becoming 2nd station in Montreal, 7th in Dominion. 

On-the~air total is 557 at this writing, of which 123 are uhf. 

Corpus Christ! grant was final decision , after competing H.L. Hunt amended 
to new channel. It's owned by group of local businessmen and public officials. 

Commission's hearing in Buffalo Ch. 2 case — where it suspects there was a 
"strike" application (Vol. 9:50) — opened Jan. 8, but was continued to Jan. 15 
pending attempts to narrow down issues through stipulations. FCC hasn't yet acted 
on petition of Buffalo's uhf WBUF-IV to intervene (Vol. 10:1). 

FCC this week scheduled Feb. 5 hearings for Jacksonville, Ch. 12; Muskogee, 
Okla. , Ch. 8; Tulsa, Ch. 2 & 17 ; Biloxi, Miss., Ch. 13. 

NEWSPAPER & THEATRE FOLK LEAD OWNERSHIP: No longer eyed askance , newspaper owner- 
ship of TV stations appears to be as firmly entrenched as in radio — and scrutiny 
reveals 105 of the 356 operating stations (roughly 30%) are owned in whole or part 
by newspaper publishing interests. Proportion is about same as for radio stations. 

You'd expect theatrical interests to be represented in more than the mere 
35 stations shown in the study, completed this week to show breakdowns of ownership 
by categories for listing in our upcoming TV Factbook . Electronic manufacturers now 
own 22 stations, networks 19, universities & colleges 6 (only 2 non-commercial). 

Multiple ov/nership tabulation has expanded considerably, but only 4 entities 
have allowable limit of 5 — ABC, CBS, NBC, Storer. DuMont & Crosley have 4 each. 
Among newspaper interests, Scripps-Howard, Gannett, Newhouse and Steinmans have 3 
each; quite a few newspaper entities own 2 stations each, in whole or part. 

The newspaper list embraces all from outright ownership (like Chicago Trib- 
une's pioneer WGN-TV and its interlocking ownership with New York News' WPIX) to 
partial ov/nership (like Wichita Beacon's mere 5% interest in KEDD) to such identical 
ownership as WCOC-TV, Meridian, Miss, with weekly Clark County Tribune. 

The count of 105 does not , however , include the 4 stations owned by Meredith 
Publishing Co . (Better Homes & Gardens) ; the 2 partially owned by Time Inc . (Time- 
Life-Fortune) ; and the one owned by same interests as the Prairie Farmer , Chicago. 

Theatrical interests range from the American Broadcasting-Paramount Theatre 
group of 5 to the single stations owned by such entities as Paramount Pictures and 
the Walter Reade chain; also the holdings of actors Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, James 
Stewart and Mary Pickford Rogers. 

TV Factbook No. 18 of Jan. 15, 1954 will also carry a complete record of all 
major station transfer deals since 1949. It's a 378-p. volume that lists all TV 
Stations in the U.S., Canada. Mexico & Cuba , with facilities, personnel, rates, etc. ; 
has new log of TV stations throughout the world ; complete vhf-uhf channel alloca - 
tion tables ; directories of TV set and tube manufacturers , with executives; direc- 
tories of major advertising agencies , program producers , station sales reps , etc. 

And each Factbook includes a 43x29-in. Map of TV Cities and Network Routes, suitable 
for framing, in color, revised to Jan. 1, 1954. 

Note ; Extra copies of the Factbook will be available Jan. 18 at $3 each. 

NEARLY 300 COMMUNITY ANTENNA SYSTEMS: Growth and durability of community antenna 
systems continues to be a quiet phenomenon — they're sprouting and flourishing very 
nicely despite tripling of TV stations on the air during the last year. 

Nvunber of homes served by systems is insignificant, frankly, when compared 
with the 27,000,000 served directly by stations. That isn't the point. What is 
significant is that the systems represent several hundred going businesses — many 
of them returning a very handsome profit. 

Combing through up-to-date directory of systems compiled for our upcoming 
TV Factbook No. 18, we have derived some extremely interesting figures: 

(1) 299 systems are now operating , against 240 six months ago (Vol. 9:28), 

149 year ago (Vol. 9:4), 94 eighteen months ago (Vol. 8:27). In addition, 29 are 
now under construction or in planning stage. 

(2) 120 of the 299 reported number of subscribers , for total of 64,189 vs. 



- 6 - 



39,796 for the 92 reporting 6 months ago, 13,750 for the 69 reporting 18 months ago. 

(3) Average system has 535 subscribers , compared with 452 for the 92 report- 
ing 6 months ago, 199 for the 69 reporting 18 months ago. 

(4) 115 estimated they have total potential of 211,025 subscribers, for an 
average of 1835 each, against total of 167,150 for the 96 estimating 6 months ago 
(average 1741), 144,356 for the 74 estimating 18 months ago (average 1950). 

(5) Largest system reports "over 4000 " ; this is the Whitney-Jerrold opera- 
tion in Williamsport, Pa . Largest claimed 6 months ago was 2500. Currently, next 
largest are; 3600, 3300, 3000, 2500, 2500, 2200, 1950, 1781, 1505. Including these, 
19 operators claim 1000 or more. 

Lacking reports from all 299 operators , we can't give a reliable figure for 
total homes served , but we'd guess it at about 100,000 . Since start of pay-as-you- 
look operations on Telemeter's system in Palm Springs, Cal. (Vol. 9:49), interest 
in the total has become very keen — because it's an index to possible boxoffice 
— but there's a tendency in some quarters to exaggerate the potential. 



Personal Noias; Edward L. Saxe appointed v.p. & asst, 
to CBS-TV pres. Jack Van Volkenburg; formerly con- 
troller, he will handle financial matters mainly . . . Norman 
Siegel resigns as CBS-TV west coast director of publicity 
& exploitation . . . Harold L. Morgan Jr., ABC v.p. in 
charge of TV production services dept., named v.p. & comp- 
troller; Jason Rabinovitz, asst, comptroller; W. C. Tap- 
per, chief accountant; Edward Graessle Jr., asst, chief 
accountant; Robert L. Stone, director of TV production 
services dept. . . . A. G. Flanagan, commercial mgr., XETV, 
Tijuana (San Diego), named asst. gen. mgr. of KCOP, Los 
Angeles (changed from KLAC-TV) under new owner Cop- 
ley Press Inc.’s TV-radio v.p. & gen. mgr. Jack Heintz; 
Wilson Edwards succeeds Heintz as mgr. of radio KSDO, 
San Diego . . . Robert M. Baird, Dallas mgr. of John E. 
Pearson rep firm, named TV v.p. . . . Elmer W. Lower pro- 
moted to director of news & public affairs, CBS-TV, Wash- 
ington; Wm. Corrigan, newsfilm mgr.; Donald W. Richard- 
son, syndication mgr. . . . Neal J. Edwards, ex-WTTG, 
named sales mgr. of WMAL-TV, Washington, succeeding 
Harvey Glascock, resigned; no replacement yet at WTTG 
. . . Paul H. Chapman, ex-WFBC, Greenville, S. C. (AM- 
FM-TV) has opened own TV-radio brokerage office to serve 
the South; address is 84 Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta, phone 
Lamar 2036 . . . Mitchell DeGroot named ABC-TV director 
of adv. & promotion in separation of depts., Eugene Accas 
handling radio; Andrew Ross named ABC ai’t director . . . 
Glenn Shaw, recently with KLX, Oakland, named asst, 
mgr., KCCC-TV, Sacramento, Cal., under gen. mgr. Ashley 
Robison; John J. Kehoe, ex-KCRA, Sacramento, named 
sales mgr. . . . Herbert Pangborn, CBS-TV technical opera- 
tions mgr., Hollywood, elected pres.. Society of TV Engi- 
neers of So. Calif.; Edward Benham, KTTV chief engineer, 
secy.-treas. . . . W'm. L. Clark, ex-asst. sales mgr., WPIX, 
N. Y., named Hollywood mgr., ABC film syndication . . . 
Howard Anderson, ex-film director, WFAA-TV, Dallas, 
joins Dallas office of Motion Pictures for TV . . . Halsey V. 
Barrett resigns as eastern sales mgr.. Consolidated TV 
sales . . . John W. Owen, ex-Petry, joins Avery-Knodel as 
coordinator of promotion, research & sales . . . Wm. T. 
Romaine named director of public affairs, WSAZ-TV, 
Huntington . . . Ben Starr, ex-v.p., elected pres, of western 
region of TV Writers of America, succeeding Hugh Wed- 
lock, resigned; Nate Monaster replaces Starr . . . Walter 
Francis transferred from AT&T New York headquarters 
to become information supervisor of Kansas City office 
. . . Wm. M. Koblenzer promoted to eastern sales mgr., 
DuMont Network . . . Branch L. Komendo named south 
w'estern district supervisor, NBC merchandising dept. 
. . . Stanley S. Simpson, ex-San Francisco radio sales 
executive, appointed mgr. of KCOK-TV, Tulare, Cal. 



George H. Frey, NBC-TV sales v.p., succeeds recently 
resigned Jack Herbert as v.p. in charge of network sales, 
as NBC board Jan. 8 also elected Thomas McAvity v.p. 
in charge of TV network programming (succeeding Syl- 
vester Weaver, now pres.) and Carl M. Stanton, v.p. in 
charge of film div. succeeding Robert W. Sarnoff, now 
exec. v.p.). Harry C. Hagerty, financial v.p.. Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Co., member of RCA board, elected to NBC 
board. 

New officers of TV-Radio Correspondents Assn., in 
charge of TV-radio galleries in Congress: chairman, Rich- 
ard Harkness, NBC, succeeding Martin Agronsky, ABC, 
who becomes ex-officio member of exec, committee; vice- 
chairman, Wm. Costello, CBS; secy., Joseph F. McCaffrey, 
MBS; treas., Gunnar Back, ABC. Exec, committee mem- 
bers: Julian Goodman, NBC (reelected); Ann Corrick, 
WLWT & V/LW, Cincinnati (reelected) ; Wm. Higgin- 
botham, United Press-Movietone News. 

ABC Los Angeles commentator Chet Huntley got $10,- 
000 and public apology this week from one Mrs. Rae Such- 
man, who accused him to his sponsors of being a com- 
munist, in out-of-court settlement of his $200,000 suit. 
Apology published as paid ad in Herald & Express read: 
“I have no evidence that Mr. Huntley is other than a 
patriotic, loyal American [or] which links him with any 
subversive organization or undertaking.” 

Rev. S. Franklin Mack, Bound Brook, N. J., elected 
executive director of Broadcasting & Film Commission, 
National Council of Churches of Christ in U. S. A., under 
Dr. Clayton T. Griswold. He succeeds Dr. Ronald Bridges, 
retiring Feb. 1 to become visiting professor at Bowdoin 
College, Lewiston, Me. 

Edwin Moss Williams, ex-UP business mgr. who has 
been publishing the Elizabeth City (N. J.) Daily Advance, 
has sold the newspaper to Dear Publications & Radio 
Corp., of Jersey City, onetime publisher of Jersey Journal. 

Vic Diehm, operator of WAZL, Hazleton, Pa., named 
principal speaker of U of Georgia’s 9th annual Radio & 
Television Institute, Jan. 27-80. 

Ninth annual Michigan State Radio & Tele\nsion Con- 
ference of commercial and educational broadcasters has 
been scheduled for March 5 at East Lansing. 

B 

Edward C. Hartung, 66, FCC accountant since 1935, 
died Jan. 3 in Washington. He is survived by his widow, 
2 married daughters, 3 grandchildren. 

Mrs. Lillian Paley, 62, wife of Jay Paley, retired turf- 
man and one of founders of CBS, died Jan. 2 at her Los 
Angeles home. She was an aunt of Wm. S. Paley, CBS 
chairman. 



- 7 - 



Station Accounts: TV-radlo advertising is expected to 
be used by grocers more often this year than in the past 
as they increase adv. & promotion budgets to meet rising 
competition, according to Vincent L. Browner, pres, of 
National Assn, of Retail Grocers, Chicago . . . Ford Motor 
Co.’s current campaign for its 1954 cars and trucks is using 
270 TV stations (as against 107 last year) plus 1418 radio 
stations, thru J. Walter Thompson; dealer newspaper ad- 
vertising on introduction was hiked 30%, magazine 22% 
. . . Renuzit Home Products Co., to promote Odorless 
Renuzit, rug and upholstery cleaner, tested TV-radio in 
Pittsburgh for 13 weeks, now plans 17-market TV cam- 
paign which may be expanded later, thru Feigenbaum & 
Wermen, Philadelphia . . . Wildroot Cream Oil has bought 
rights to A1 Capp’s Fearless Fosdick cartoon detective for 
central theme of 1954 ad campaign, which will include TV- 
radio, thru BBDO . . . CBS-Columbia Inc., seeking bigger 
place as a TV set maker, will spend more than $1,000,000 
on adv. & promotion first 6 months of this year, including 
TV-radio spot, thru Ted Bates & Co. , . . Sears Roebuck, 
Los Angeles, sponsoring Dude Martin Show on KTTV for 
last 30 months, on Jan. 18 starts 2 half-hour dramatic 
films daytime each weekday, featuring name stars and 
produced specially for TV ; both will be shown within 
12:45-2 p.m. period bought by big chain, with Dude Mar- 
tin’s service retained . . . Among other advertisers reported 
using or preparing to use TV: Orleans Canning Co., Chi- 
cago (All-Meat dog food), thru Presba-Fellers & Presba, 
Chicago; Adams Corp., Korn Kurls Div., Beloit, Wis. (Korn 
Kurls), direct; National Association of Engine & Boat 
Mfrs. (motorboat show), thru Lewis A. King, N. Y.; 
Quaker Oats Co. (Aunt Jemima cake mix), thru J. Walter 
Thompson, Chicago; Modglin Co. Inc., Los Angeles (plastic 
brooms & brushes), thru Roy S. Durstine Co., Los Angeles; 
Norwich Pharmacal Co. (Flavettes anti-smoking pills), 
thru Benton & Bowles, N. Y.; Glamorene Inc. (rug 
cleanser), thru Hicks & Greist, N. Y.; C. A. Durr Packing 
Co., Utica, N. Y. (Durr’s First Quality hams & bacon), 
thru Farquhar & Co., Utica; Laurel Products Inc., Cleve- 
land (Nusoft fabric rinse), thru McCann-Erickson, Cleve- 
land; Beto Corp., Dallas (Koracin medicinal), thru Frank 
J. Miller Adv., Hollywood, Cal. 

Network Accounts: Arthur Godfrey quickly picked up 

General Motors as alt. sponsor (with Pillsbury flour) of 
Arthur Godfrey and His Friends on CBS-TV Wed. 8-9 
p.m., within day after Chesterfields dropped out in move 
which network insisted was based solely on financial con- 
siderations and wasn’t related to recent furore over firing 
of singer Julius La Rosa. Chesterfields also bowed out of 
Mon. & Wed. 11:15-11:30 a.m. segment of Arthur Godfrey 
Show on CBS simulcast — but network spokesman antici- 
pates no trouble in lining up sponsor . . . Emerol Mfg. Co. 
(Marvel Mystery oil) sponsors Tommy H enrich Sports 
Show on ABC-TV starting Jan. 16, Sat. 6-6:15 p.m., thru 
Hilton & Riggio . . . Hazel Bishop (lipstick) sponsors Dr. 
I.Q. on ABC-TV starting Jan. 18, Mon. 8:30-9 p.m., thru 
Raymond Spector Co. . . . Post Cereals buys Portia Faces 
Life on CBS-TV starting in April, Mon.-thru-Fri. 1:15- 
1:30 p.m., thru Young & Rubicam . . . Whitehall Pharmacal 
Co. (drugs) and Boyle-Midway Inc. (Plastic Wood) sponsor 
Mon.-Wed.-Fri. segments of The Bright Star on CBS-TV 
starting Feb. 1, Mon.-thru-Fri. 4:15-4:30 p.m., former thru 
Biow, latter thru Geyer Adv. . . . Mutual of Omaha buys 
Mon. & Wed. segments of John Daly and the News on 
ABC-TV starting Feb. 4, Mon.-thru-Fri. 7:1.5-7:30 p.m., 
thru Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha . . . American Chicle Co. & 
DuMont Labs shift Colonel Humphrey Flack from Wed. 
9-9:30 p.m. to Sat. 10-10:30 p.m. on DuMont starting Jan. 
9 . . . DuMont brings back Author Meets the Critics as 
sustaining program starting Jan. 17, Sun. 7-7:30 p.m.; 
Dig Issue goes off DuMont Jan. 18 after year as sustainer. 



Take your choice — the $7.7 billion estimated by N. Y. 
Herald Tribune’s Joseph Kaselow or the $7.9 billion by 
N. Y. Times’ James J. Nagle as total expenditures by all 
advertisers on all media during 1953. That’s 10% above 
1952, and better. What’s more, says Kaselow, it looks as 
if the pattern will be continued in 1954, when some adver- 
tising authorities see total advertising “hitting the $8 bil- 
lion mark as the battle of the sales curves is joined.” For 
perspective, adds Kaselow, it should be noted that in 1939 
the figure was $2 billion. Newspapers, magazines, TV, 
radio, direct mail, industrial advertising all hit new highs, 
according to their surveys. Nagle says 1953 TV expendi- 
tures will go well above the $650,000,000 of 1952 (time & 
talent), quoting McCann-Erickson, which does annual 
Printer’s Ink survey. Kaselow puts TV figure at $448,- 
000,000 (network & station revenues alone), quoting 
NARTB’s Richard P. Doherty. Latter also guesses radio 
up 3% to about $490,000,000. Notably, says Nagle, some 
industries are still shifting from radio to TV — cigarettes, 
cosmetics, insurance and beer, for example; but other im- 
portant companies are now using radio for first time or 
have returned to it. Note: Our own guesstimate is still 
between $450-475,000,000 as total revenues of TV’s 4 net- 
works and 350-odd stations in 1953 (Vol. 9:52). 

Most of O. L. Taylor Co.’s TV & AM station lists left 
over after recent consolidation with Raymer, are being ac- 
quired by newly formed Venard Inc., organized by Lloyd 
George Venard, ex-Taylor N. Y. mgr., with main offices at 
444 Madison Ave., N. Y. Venard Inc. also has ex-Taylor 
Chicago chief Howard Meyers in charge of Chicago office, 
35 E. Wacker Dr., and Duncan A. Scott as rep for San 
Francisco & Los Angeles. Besides 28 AMs, Venard Inc. 
will represent these 8 TVs: WITV, Ft. Lauderdale-Miami; 
WKLO-TV, Louisville; WFIE, Evansville; KCMC-TV, Tex- 
arkana, Tex.; WCOV-TV, Montgomery, Ala.; WILS-TV, 
Lansing, Mich.; KTXL-TV, San Angelo, Tex.; KMID-TV, 
Midland, Tex. Only others on Taylor list are CP holders 
WERE-TV, Cleveland; WJTN-TV, Jamestown, N. Y.; 
KTRE-TV, Lufkin, Tex. 

Pioneer uhf KPTV received permission fi’om Portland, 
Ore. city council to construct new 500-ft. antenna tower on 
city-owned Council Crest. City also extended to 20 years 
KPTV’s permit to maintain broadcast facilities at the site. 
Station, which was sold this week to Storer Broadcasting 
Co. along with WXEL, Cleveland, by Herbert Mayer (see 
p. 3), will dismantle and install old WXEL tower atop 
Council Crest, give old 210-ft. tower to city for civil de- 
fense use. Station officials predicted higher tower “will 
eliminate completely 3 of the current close-in shadow areas 
and show 60% improvement in remaining shadow areas.” 

New “Chromalyzer,” now in production by Telechrome 
Inc., is designed to provide all necessary color signals 
for adjusting color monitors, transmitters and receivers. 
Selling for $1650, it’s aimed at stations, manufacturers, 
distributors, servicemen — for use when other color signal 
source isn’t available. Introducing device. Telechrome 
pres. Ray Clurman noted that if FCC approves his sug- 
gestion that stations transmit continuous color signals 
(Vol. 9:51), market for product will be drastically reduced. 

Rather than wait for color equipment, chief engineer 
John T. Wilner and staff, WBAL-TV, Baltimore, are 
equipping station for network rebroadcasts and slide color- 
casts at estimated $25,000, compared with some $75,000 
for same equipment from manufacturer. 

Mutual Broadcasting System reports $23,003,242 bill- 
ings in 1953, up 10% from 1952 and its second best year, 
comparing with $26,000,000 in 1946. Big radio chain had 
80 advertisers, including 17 of radio’s top 25. 

H. B. LeQuatte Inc. has been dissolved, and Mr. Le- 
Quatte, ex-pres. of Advertising Club of N. Y., has joined 
Abbott Kimball Co. as v.p. & chairman of plans board. 



- 8 - 



S LOWER PACE of new-station starters in ensuing 
months is indicated by paucity of shipments from the 
major transmitter manufacturers in recent weeks. Neither 
DuMont nor RCA reported any new-station shipments or 
orders this week, and GE reported only that the 1-kw 
previously said to have gone to KSAN-TV, San Francisco 
(Ch. 32), did not get off last week but that a 100-watt 
driver was due for shipment this week, to be followed 
shortly by the 1-kw. RCA on Jan. 4 shipped 25-kw ampli- 
fier to new WLBT, Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 3), which began 
testing its 10-kw Dec. 20, and on Jan. 7 shipped 25-kw 
amplifier to WHAM-TV, Rochester (Ch. 6). GE this week 
shipped 20-kw amplifier to KATV, Pme Bluff, Ark (Ch. 
7), which began testing Dec. 18 with 5-kw. 

Upcoming stations were also slow in reporting plans. 
This week’s crop of reports is highlighted by apparent race 
of 2 new vhf granted in Duluth-Superior area, which now 
has one uhf in operation, to get going in March despite 
difficulty of construction due to weather (see below). 

* * ♦ * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

KDAL-TV, Duluth (Ch. 3), has RCA equipment on 
order, is expanding AM studios for TV, expects to have 
transmitter building ready in 30 days and equipment in- 
stalled by end of Feb., plans March tests with low power 
and interim single-bay bat-wing antenna, reports pres. -gen. 
mgr. Dalton LeMasurier. Cocoon superstructure is being 
built first over transmitter site to negate weather delays. 
Mr. LeMasurier also owns 10% of WIRL, iV applicant 
for Peoria, and controls WQUA, Moline, 111. Avery-Knodel 
will be rep. 

WDSM-TV, Duluth (Ch. 6), with 5-kw GE transmitter 
on tap for delivery by Feb. 15, when new studio-transmitter 
bldg, will be ready, plans early Feb. tests, programming 
March 1, reports gen.-mgr. Rodney A. Quick. WDSM-TV 
is controlled by Northwest Publications Inc., publisher of 
Duluth Herald and News Tribune (Ridder) which also 
controls WCCO-TV, Minneapolis. Free & Peters will 
be rep. 



Trade Personals: Albert C. Beeson, onetime industrial 

relations director for National Union Radio, nominated by 
President Eisenhower to be member of National Labor Re- 
lations Board . . . A. Melvin Skellett, manufacturing-engi- 
neering v.p.. National Union Radio Corp., elected to board 
of directors . . . Hal Conklin, ex-mgr. of Admiral San Fran- 
cisco distributing branch, named gen. sales mgr. of parent 
company, succeeding Paul Dye, who resigned to become 
partner in Dykro Distributors, new Motorola Milwaukee 
outlet . . . Cole H. Pilcher appointed Sylvania director of 
industrial relations, succeeding Howard L. Richardson, now 
v.p. in charge of engineering operations . . . John N. Phil- 
lips named mgr. of color TV product engineering, Carroll 
R. Miner mgr. of monochrome product engineering, GE 
TV-radio dept., Syracuse . . . G. W. DeSousa, ex-marketing 
administration mgr., named mgr. of GE equipment tube 
sales, replacing Grady L. Roark, now marketing mgr. of 
tube dept.; DeSousa is succeeded by Milton J. Strehle, ex- 
mgr. of intra-company tube sales . . . John P. Kearney, 
mgr. of industrial & electronics sales div., Kimble Glass 
Co., promoted to mgr. of new product development, suc- 
ceeded by John P. Gleason; R. W. M. Ritter, western sales 
mgr., named eastern regional sales mgr., succeeding Glea- 
son . . . Loyd Dopkins resigns as Crosley mgr. of major 
accounts . . . Joseph F. Effinger named GE color TV set 
sales mgr., succeeded as Cincinnati district mgr. by John 
Gillian . . . Robert L. Russell, ex-director of subsidiary 
operations, named v.p. & gen. mgr., Hallici'afters Canada 
Ltd. . . . M. F. Blakeslee, ex-RCA Victor, named director 



WJNO-TV, West Palm Beach, Fla. (Ch. 5), has or- 
dered RCA equipment far April 1 delivery, hasn’t begun 
construction, but hopes to test by June 1 and begin pro- 
gramming July 1, reports pres. William H. Cook. Theo- 
dore Granik (American Forum of the Air) owns 24%. 
Rep not yet chosen. 

CKLW-TV, Windsor-Detroit (Ch. 9), will begin next 
July, during Windsor Centennial, with 4-11 p.m. pro- 
gramming, according to pres.-gen. mgr. J. E. Campeau 
speaking at recent ground-breaking ceremonies for $1,- 
250,000 studio-tower construction project. New AM-TV 
studios & offices and 670-ft. TV tower will be at Sandwich 
& Ci’awford Sts. on Detroit River waterfront. It will be 
first Canadian station to start with maximum 325-kw 
visual, 220-kw aural powers, says Mr. Campeau. Reps will 
be Adam Young (for U. S.) & All-Canada Television. 

WTOC-TV, Savannah, Ga. (Ch. 11), didn’t meet Jan. 
1 test target because of antenna difficulties, now hasn’t 
specific date, although construction will be completed by 
end of Jan., reports production mgr. Dwight J. Bruce. 
Rep will be Katz. 

WNET, Providence, R. I. (Ch. 16), with 1-kw RCA 
transmitter on hand and studio-transmitter building 80% 
complete, plans Feb. 1 tests from 420-ft. Stainless tower, 
with programming to start Feb. 15, reports gen. mgr. John 
B. Porterfield. It will be first local competition for pre- 
freeze WJAR-TV (Ch. 10). WPRO-TV (Ch. 12), other 
grantee there, has been delayed by protest. Rep will be 
Raymer. 

WJPB-TV, Fairmont, W. Va. (Ch. 35) has just com- 
pleted transmitter house, now plans Feb. 1 tests with 
Continental 1-kw transmitter, reports pres. J. Patrick 
Beacom. Ralph Forbes, ex-WPIX, named TV director; 
Sheldon Loner, engineering dh’ector; Bruce McGinnis, 
commercial manager; Jack Tennant, film & camera head. 
Hour rate will be $200. Rep v/ill be Headley-Reed. 

WMGT, Adams, Mass. (Ch. 74), had antenna diffi- 
culties, didn’t make Dec. 25 target, now hopes to start 
about mid-Jan. with 12-kw GE transmitter, according to 
pres. Leon Podolsky (Sprague Electric Co.). Hour rate 
will be $250. Rep will be Walker. 



of distributor relations, Emerson Radio . . . Saul Louis, 
part owner of Pacific Vogue Radio & TV Co., assumes 
duties of Myron Blackman, who resigned last week as sales 
v.p., though retaining 45% interest in firm . . . Henry 
Goldsmith, ex-sales mgr. of Sonora, forms Evans Radio 
Co., Evanston, 111., to manufacture radios & phonographs 
. . . Thomas Greiscr, ex-gen. mgr. Worth Co., Philadel- 
phia (electronic controls), named asst, to CBS-Columbia 
administrative v.p. Charles Kayko . . . Stanley I. Messing 
has resigned as mgr. of contract div., Fidelity Tube and 
Jewel Radio, now in bankruptcy proceedings (see p. 13) 

. . . Kenneth H. Grady appointed controller. Merit Coil & 
Transformer Corp., Chicago . . . Robert A. Van Valken- 
burgh, govt, contracts mgr., heads new Washington sales 
office of National Co., Malden, Mass. . . . Anthony Dillon, 
ex-new markets mgr., named eastern sales mgr., CBS- 
Columbia . . . Art Kemp, ex-RCA Victor, named Stewart- 
Warner Electric’s Detroit regional sales mgr., succeeding 
Mike Craffey . . . Seymour Cominsky, ex-Philco Distribu- 
tors Inc., Philadelphia, named Philco district mgr. for 
Washington-Maryland-Delaware area. 



Wm. E. Robinson, exec. v.p. & publisher of N. Y. Her- 
ald Tribune and member of RCA & NBC boards, has re- 
signed from the newspaper to become chairman and chief 
executive officer of Steve Hannagan Associates Inc., public 
relations counsel; he remains on companies’ boards, though 
their public relations counsel is Carl Byoir Associates. 




wHh Electronics Reports 



WASHINGTON 5. D C * TEIEPHONE STERIING 3-1755 



Trade Report 
January 9, 1954 






ESTIMATED 1953 PRODUCTIOR-7,261,109: Remember those TV cutbacks planned by set makers 

last fall for first quarter of 1954 (Vol. 9:44)? Now comes news they won’t be as 
shar p as first thought, thanks to business upswing in November and December, which 
has inspired some set makers to revise upward their first-quarter output. 

RCA, Motorola and Hallicraf ters say they're increasing TV production over 
and above proposed curtailment. As Motorola v.p. E.R. Taylor explained, "we won't 
be going full tilt, or anywhere near first quarter of last year, but good volume in 
the last 2 months, with resulting lower inventories , has given us the chance to 
take a second look — and we are increasing our output as a result." Admiral and 
Phllco spokesmen say they didn't cut back production in last quarter 1953, nor had 
they planned to in first quarter of 1954 — hence their plans are unchanged. 

Zenith v.p. H.C. Bonfig , without referring to Zenith's plans, commented that 
industry estimates for 1953 have been upped recently from 5,000,000 to 5,500,000. 



* * ♦ * 



TV industry produced 7,261,109 sets in 1953, according to preliminary RETMA 
estimate released this week. This is based on official 11-month production count 
of 6,765,000 — plus estimated 496,109 turned out in 5-week Dec. — 2 of them short 
holiday weeks which produced only 70,936 & 46,407, respectively. It was the indus- 
try's second best year , surpassed only by the 7,463,800 produced in 1950, and way 
above the 6,096,279 turned out in 1952. 

It was a good year for retail sale s as well as production. Sales were about 
6,500,000, thanks once again to pickup in last 2 months. And as result, inventory 
stood at about 1,900,000 in all pipelines at year's end — not considered dangerous, 
even when compared with the 1,200,000 with which industry entered 1953. 

Radios had a whopping year , too, output totaling 13,361,505 (heavily auto & 
table sets). Sales are estimated at nearly 13,000,000 — though RETMA keeps no 
official tabulation of auto set sales. Radio production in 1952 was 10,934,872. 

Note ; Month-by-month figures on 1950-53 production of TVs by types of sets 
will be carried in our TV Factbook No. 18 , due shortly. Book will also carry tables 
on factory sales, factory inventories , distributor purchases , distributor inventor- 
ies, shipments to dealers & retail sales of TVs, plus factory, distributor & retail 
sales of radios by months, 1950-53; shipments of TVs to dealers by states, 1950-53. 

DEALERS CONFIDENT AFTER SEEING COLOR: Lots of dealers got their first look at color 
this week at Chicago's furniture marts. Generally, they liked it — but almost to 
a man they felt that in its present status (few sets, small screens, high costs) 
and in the immediate future it won't put much of a dent in black-&-white sales. 

How to merchandise it in coming months is next on many trade agendas. Big 
event next week is NARDA convention Jan. 11-12 at Chicago's Conrad Hilton Hotel 
where, as at marts, color is expected to be dominant. Central event of convention 
is color panel Jan. 12 set up by RETMA on plans for production, programming, etc. 
(Vol. 10:1) — but color is certain to touch on such other subjects as sales train- 
ing, servicing, promotion campaigns, etc. 

Retailers got advice on color from one of their number in advance of parley. 
Writing in Jan. 5 Retailing Daily, ex-NARDA pres. Mort Farr declared ; 

" We should inform our customers that even if they have $1000 or more with 
which to buy a color set that they should have a large-screen black-&-white set to 
^ see the 90% or more programs that will be broadcast in black-&-white during 1954... 

We must learn how to sell our black-&-white sets now and still not hurt our future 
sales of color. Many people still shy from a 21-in. TV because of the propaganda 
put out by dealers and salesmen when we had and could get 12-in. sets and could not 



- 9 - 



10 - 



get enough 17-in. ones. Let's not so sell against color that we have to start all 
over again educating our customers when we have plenty to deliver." 

All levels of trade seemed glad color was out of rumor and whisper stage. 
WTiatever its problems, color is certainly easier to cope with once it's out in open 
where sets can be seen, its assets & weaknesses evaluated, & solutions formulated. 

D ealers v/e spoke to at marts felt color would be excellent traffic-build er. 
Said one: "My customers won't buy any §1000 set — but they'll be plenty curious to 
see the set and once I get it on my floor I'm going to push black-&-white to beat 
the band." Another commented: "It's wonderful, but too small." 

There vjas one school of thought which anticipated that, as in early days of 
TV, substantial orders would come from bars and taverns for first color sets. 

Set makers made modest pitch to dealers on color. No commitments were made 
on quantity, dates of deliveries, sizes of screens — undoubtedly with eye to ad- 
vances in laboratories toward larger tubes (see p. 1). Only one to speak publicly 
was RCA v.p. J.B. Elliott , who told press conference first color shipments should 
be made in March , when industry will probably ship about 1000 sets. He estimated 
this year's production at about 100,000 , with public getting about 70,000. Output 
in 1955 will "possibly reach the half-million mark," he added. 

Nobody has color tubes or sets in quantity as yet — even RCA admitting to 
mere 150 sets, all out on loan within the company and to its distributors. 

Color receivers were shown by many , priced by few. These set makers showed 
pilot models : Admiral, Arvin, Bendix, Capehart-Farnsworth, CBS-Columbia, Crosley, 
DuMont, GE, Hallicraf ters , Majestic, Motorola, Olympic, Philharmonic, RCA, Raytheon, 
Sentinel, Sparton, Stewart-Warner , Westinghouse , Zenith. Notable exception : Philco, 
v/hose v.p. Fred Ogilby told us company wanted to wait until its receiver was "in a 
further stage of development." He didn't amplify. 

Only ones with price tags as yet announced are Admiral $1175 , Bendix §1200 , 
CBS-Columbia $975 & §1200 , Motorola $1150 , Philharmonic $800 , Sentinel $995 . 

To give mart visitors glimpses of color , RCA and DuMont demonstrated their 
flying-spot scanners for showing of color slides. Motorola fed 16mm color film from 
its scanner to both color and black-&-white for contrast effect. All others were 
fed slides from Hazeltine Chicago labs, via AT&T circuits. 

Opinions varied as to quality of pictures , though many expressed preference 
for DuMont and RCA. Pictures on Hazeltine feed appeared faded at times, an opinion 
shared by many experienced color hands, though some smaller companies complained 
they hadn't had a chance to set up and tune their sets to best advantage. Several 
sets arrived in Chicago only night before showing. 

* *1 * * 

In wake of lower price pattern set by leaders in last month (Vol. 9:50-10:1), 
pric e reductions on current monochrome lines were evident on all sides , as expected 
(for details, see p. 12). Many companies vied for lowest possible lists, with some 
17-in. sets as low as $150 — and there was lots of "shopping" in competitors' booths. 

With lower prices came less costly cabinets . Metal & plastic cabinets were 
found in the lines of nearly all companies seeking to salvage some profit from the 
drastically lower lists. Said one major manufacturer: 

" I didn't want to lower my prices now but I had to when my competition did. 
We're not doing the dealers any favor by lowering prices because in nearly all cases 
we've had to shave the dealer discounts to make ends meet." 

Asked whether set prices would go even lower , he shuddered and said: "My God, 
I don't see how they can, without avoiding a suicidal price war!" 

COLOR GAINS IMPETUS ON ALL FRONTS: A lot of "milestone s" will be passed in color 

TV, and a lot of "firsts" will be hailed, but we suspect that Jan. 1 Tournament of 
Roses Parade will stand as one of most significant — for several reasons. 

It brought color to 22 cities , most of them for first time (Vol. 9:52). It 
gave maybe 50-100,000 influential people their initial glimpse of color. It gave 



11 - 



the industry's most important merchandisers a chance to judge the probable reactions 
of their customers — and they generally concluded that they have little to worry 
about for the moment, that cost-size-quality of the sets will have minor effect on 
sales of black-&-white receivers at today's prices (see pp. 9 & 12). 

But long-range impact of program cannot be underestimated. Industry has done 
effective job of conditioning public so that the transition should be smooth, but 
people who saw a good presentation of the show will never forget it. 

We've been deluged with reports of reactions across the country, but merely 
one comment, picked at random, typifies the impact. Omaha's Mayor Glenn Cunningham, 
after watching show over WOW- TV, said; " Most amazing thing I've ever witnessed." 

Multiply that several thousand-fold , then amplify by newspaper reports. And 
add such things as feat of Minneapolis Star, which shot picture off KSTP-TV moni- 
tor, ran it on front page next day in full color. Cumulative effect is enormous. 

Counter-balancing such "pro" factors to some degree were comments such as 
those of columnist John Crosby , who obtained only so-so results with set in his home 
on loan. He wrote; "The colors, which I had been boasting were truer than Techni- 
color, ran all over the place ; when I got the reds to look red, the green looked 
almost black; when I turned up the greens, the reds went wild and everyone turned 
red." However, he said, engineers told him transmission was at fault. He did end 
up by concluding; " Black-&-white is no competition to color TV — even bad color TV 
— and this was about as bad as it ever gets." 

We saw program in Washington on Hoffman, Philco and RCA sets — and results 
ranged from superb to rather poor . On best set, it was breath-taking. We'd guess 
that Crosby's set wasn't quite aligned in the first place — and he probably should 
have resisted impulse to try to straighten it out. 

NBC is continuing to schedule more "commercial premieres" of all its regular 
programs, next being Original Amateur Hour Jan. 9. On Jan. 12, it is conducting a 
closed-circuit demonstration of use of color in spot and local advertising. 

4: ♦ P|c 

Origination of color programs has stabilized , in our opinion, so that one 
can almost always count on the networks to supply a high-quality picture. Stations 
are coming along well, too, so that they generally rebroadcast network feeds with 
stability. Local originations will suffer many vagaries for some time, and it will 
be months before any except network stations originate live programs. 

RCA won't ship any cameras until late spring; only ones extant are NBC's in 
New York and in the mobile unit used in Pasadena (which is returning to New York) 
plus the one CBS has. But at least one telecaster, Walter Damm, WTMJ-TV, Milwau- 
kee, is already working to make camera pay for itself when it arrives, expected in 
May or June — by signing Blatz Brewery for station's first live show. 

The really great turmoil is in set manufacturing industry. Extremely criti- 
cal and expensive decisions are being made daily — above all in picture tubes . For 
roundup of the knowns and unknowns of color tubes and receivers, see pp. 1 & 9-10. 



B attle of “who contributed what” to color continues. 

Attacked by many of its competitors recently for 
claiming lion’s share of color development (Vol. 9:52, 
10:1), RCA this week garnered suppoi’t of Sen. Johnson, 
once its most vigorous critic, and Hallicrafters’ pres. Wm. 
J. Halligan. In letter to RCA chairman David Sarnoff 
Dec. 31, Sen. Johnson wrote: 

“I must not let 1953 pass into history without com- 
mending you heartily for the great victory you have 
won for the American people in getting for them a com- 
patible system of color TV. You spent money like water 
in the laboratory to develop this system and you pressed 
for its adoption relentlessly. 

“The scoffers said it could not be done but you were 
not influenced by their pessimism. The demands for delay 
only made you press the harder for prompt and forthright 
action. You faced the identical obstacles thrown in the 
paths of all men who have really gotten things done. 



Columbus for instance. Please accept my congratulations 
for a mighty important achievement in the art of com- 
munications.” 

In letter to FCC, Halligan said: “Let’s give credit 
where credit is due . . . Percentage-wise, you could say 
75% of the system was contributed by RCA and 25% 
by the rest of the industry, notably Hazeltine, Bell Labs, 
GE and others . . . With various manufacturers making 
conflicting claims, the public is bound to be confused . . . 
It would seem to me that our mission is to close ranks 
and work together to give the public even greater bene- 
fits from the wonderful world of electronics.” 

Volume of cross-claims has attracted considerable in- 
terest outside industry. Time Magazine, for one, is working 
up article on the controversy. 



NBC plans to convert 2 Burbank, Cal. studios to color, 
hopes to be originating color from West Coast by fall. 



12 - 



Topics & Trends of TV Trsde: Philco’s convention in 
Atlantic City Jan. 6-8, passed up some of the usual 
glamoui- this year in favor of more solid financial trim- 
mings. Pres. Wm. Balderston told distributors that Philco’s 
1953 sales were at all-time high of $429,000,000, up 16% 
from the $366,963,850 in 1952 (Vol. 9:10). And he said 
1953 was Philco’s best year for TV sales, even better than 
industry’s top j^ear of 1950, though as usual he gave no 
breakdown by products. 

Philco’s over-all earnings last year were reported as 
approximately $13,000,000 after taxes, or $3.40 per share 
of common stock after allowing for 5% stock dividend 
paid in Dec. It also had non-recurring income from the 
sale of WPTZ and prior years’ adjustments of about $5,- 
300,000 after taxes, or $1.44 per share. In 1952, Philco’s 
net profit was $11,491,207 ($3.15). 

Pres. Balderston said Philco invested approximately 
$6,900,000 in plants and equipment during 1953, including 
expansion of tube plant at Lansdale, Pa., purchase of new 
refrigeration plant at Connersville, Ind. (increasing re- 
frigeration production capacity by more than 50%), and 
acquisition of laundry equipment manufacturer Dexter 
Co. (Vol. 9:50). 

« * % 4: 

Philco followed up its action last week of introducing 
new 21-in. sets at lower prices (Vol. 10:1) by reducing 
9 of the table models still further this week: No. 4001E, 
mahogany plastic, from $200 to $180; No. 4001M, mahog- 
any $230 to $200; No. 4001L, blonde $250 to $230; No. 
4003, mahogany $260 to $240; No. 4005, mahogany $280 
to $260; No. 4005L, blonde $300 to $280; No. 4007, mahog- 
any $300 to $280; No. 4007L, blonde $320 to $300; No. 
4009A, mahogany $360 to $340. It will also introduce 
aluminized 21-in. picture tube on 10 open-face consoles 
ranging from $290 to $430. It was one of several com- 
panies which introduced lower-priced sets or reduced cur- 
rent models — most of them at Chicago furniture marts 
this week. Details: 

Arvin’s 4 new models: 21-in. mahogany plastic table 
$200; 21-in. mahogany wood table $260; 21-in. open-face 
mahogany console $280; 24-in. open-face mahogany con- 
sole $390. Optional uhf tuner is $40 extra. 

Capehart-Farnsworth’s new model: 21-in. mahogany 
full-door combination $845, blonde $895, fruitwood $915. 

CBS-Columbia reduced price of Anniversary, 17-in. 
ebony metal table, from $180 to $160, and Spotlight- 
Raleigh, 21-in. open-face mahogany wood console, from 
$290 to $200, and introduced 4 new models: Capri, 17-in. 
cherry-grained table $180; Suburban, 17-in. blonde-grained 
table $190; Sutton, 21-in. metal table $180; Embassy, 21- 
in. blonde wood table $270. Optional uhf tuner is $40 extra. 

Hoffman Radio’s 5 new models, introduced at distribu- 
tor conference in Los Angeles, Dec. 29-30: 17-in. mahog- 
any wood table $180, blonde $190; 21-in. mahogany wood 
table $200; 21-in. mahogany open-face console $260, blonde 
$270; 21-in. mahogany de luxe table $280, blonde $290; 
21-in. mahogany open-face console $320, blonde $330. 
Hoffman also introduced first radios company has pro- 
duced since 1948: plastic table at $30; mahogany, blonde 
or ebony wood table $50; clock $40. It will soon intro- 
duce chairside high-fidelity consolette, with mahogany 
cabinet, at $170. 

Magnavox’s 5 new models: 17-in. plastic table $180; 
21-in. plastic table $200; 21-in. open-face mahogany con- 
sole $250; 21-in. mahogany combination $595; 21-in. 
French provincial combination $595. 

Motorola’s 3 new models: 21-in. ebony plastic table 
$190; 21-in. metal maroon table $200; 21 -in. open-face 
mahogany console $270. 



Sylvania’s price reductions: 17-in. mahogany wood 
table $180 (from $190) ; 17-in. mahogany table $200 
($280) ; 21-in. metal table $230 ($250) ; 21-in. mahogany 
table $260 ($300) ; 21-in. mahogany table $270 ($350) ; 
21-in. mahogany table $340 ($360) ; 21-in. mahogany 
open-face console $400 ($450) ; 21-in. mahogany full-door 
console $440 ($500) ; 21-in. mahogany full-door console 
$460 ($480) ; 24-in. mahogany open-face console $460 
($500) ; 24-in. mahogany full-door console $500 ($550) ; 
27-in. mahogany open-face console $550 ($600); 27-in. 
mahogany open-face console $600 ($650) ; 27-in. mahog- 
any full-door console $680 ($750); 21-in. mahogany com- 
bination $600 ($680). 

Trav-Ler Radio reduced price of 17-in. mahogany wood 
table from $180 to $150 at distributors meeting in French 
Lick, Ind. and introduced following: 21-in. mahogany 
wood table $180, blonde $200; 21-in. open-face mahogany 
console $200, blonde $220; 21-in. open-face mahogany con- 
sole, with aluminized tube $230, blonde $250; 21-in. full- 
door mahogany console $280, maple $300; 24-in. open-face 
mahogany wood console $280, blonde $300. Optional uhf 
tuner is $30-$60 extra. 

Regal’s 4 new models: 21-in. mahogany wood table 
$260; 21-in. half-door mahogany console $320; 21-in. open- 
face mahogany console $280, oak or blonde $290; 21-in. 
full-door mahogany console $430. 

Stewart-Warner’s 2 new models: 17-in. mahogany 
leatherette table $150; 17-in. mahogany wood table $170, 
blonde $180. 

Zenith reduced prices of 21-in. mahogany table from 
$250 to $200 and 17-in. mahogany console from $270 to 
$250, introduced no new sets. 

^ 4 : * 4 : 

Big nation-wide retail appliance sale on more than 
$10,000,000 worth of electric refrigerators, automatic 
washers & dryers, ranges and home freezers — with retail 
price reductions of $30-$140 — was launched this week by 
Avco for its Bendix & Crosley products. “Consolidation 
sale” was made possible by reduction in duplicate ware- 
housing, sales & service facilities in consolidation of Ben- 
dix & Crosley distributing organizations last July (Vol. 
9:30), according to v.p.-gen. mgr. Parker H. Ericksen. 
Price cuts are $30-70 on electric ranges, $70-140 on refrig- 
erators, $40-70 on washers, dryers & freezers. 

Fidelity Tube Corp. and its affiliated Gem Radio and 
Jewel Radio, list $1,168,233 liabilities and $943,570 assets 
in schedules filed in connection with Chapter XI hearings 
due to be held Jan. 19 in Newark. Schedules include 
these creditors with accounts in excess of $5000: Kimble 
Glass Co., $216,286; Corning Glass, $136,729; E. Newark 
Realty Co., $22,938; Edler Moving & Storage Co., $16,478; 
Chematron Labs, $15,414; Arthur Block, $8126. The Jewel 
Radio bankruptcy, px'eviously reported (Vol. 9:48, 10:1), 
involves $1,114,880 liabilities and $537,962 assets. 

Edward Lamb Enterprises Inc., headed by the Toledo 
attorney who also owns WICU and the Erie Dispatch 
and who recently expanded into industrial fields, has 
reorganized recently acquired White Products Corp., Mid- 
dleville, Mich, (gas & electric water heaters) and is 
making it a division of C. L. Bryant Corp., Cleveland 
(Sphinx hot air, gas & oil furnaces). Bryant will issue 
one share of its common for each $100 of White Products’ 
net worth as of last Oct. 31, estimated at $700,000. 

RETMA starts second service training course early 
next month at N. Y. Trade School, 304 East 67th St., for 
TV servicemen with at least one year of fulltime service 
experience. Its first pilot course took only TV servicemen 
with 3 years of experience. 



- 13 - 



Distributor Notes: Dykro Distributors Inc. is name of 
new Motorola Milwaukee distribution partnership formed 
by Paul R. Dye, who resigned this week as Admiral gen. 
sales mgr., and Arthur E. Kronenburg, ex-TV & radio sales 
mgr. of Taylor Electi’ic Co., Milwaukee (RCA Victor); new 
company succeeds Electro-Pliance Co. Inc. . . . Raytheon 
appoints Horn & Cox Inc., Los Angeles (Ray Cox, pres.), 
replacing James Kerwin Distributing Co. . . . Emerson 
forms Emerson Southern California Inc., 1335 So. Grand 
Ave., Los Angeles (Conrad Platt, pres.), replacing Century 
Distributing Co., latter continuing to function in San 
Diego . . . Sylvania appoints Commonwealth Sales Corp., 
Richmond, Va. (James T. Little, pres.) . . . Yancey Co. Inc., 
Atlanta (RCA Victor) elects H. H. Blevins, sales mgr., as 
v.p. . . . Peirce-Phelps Inc., Philadelphia (Admiral) names 
Herbert Bartels TV sales mgr. . . . Joseph M. Zamoiski Co., 
Washington (Philco) appoints Kenneth Foote promotion 
mgr. . . . GE Appliance Co., Pittsburgh, names John Haus- 
erman gen. mgr., succeeding late C. W. Hartenfels . . . 
Lynn Stewart Co., Chicago (Trav-Ler Radio) appoints 
Ruben R. Schoenberg sales v.p.; he’s ex-Emerson Chicago 
factory branch sales mgr. . . . Admiral establishes factory 
branches at 1140 West 5th Ave., Denver (Wm. Hand, gen. 
mgr.) and 920 Moni'oe NW, Grand Rapids, Mich. (Ralph 
Dikeman, gen. mgr.). 

Unique TV set carrying 2 shows at once was shown to 
press this week by DuMont. Dubbed the “Duoscopic”, 
basically a promotional item for display by dealers, it got 
big play in press, especially pictorial. It uses 2 complete 
TV circuits, has 2 picture tubes, superimposing pictures 
from any 2 channels on the same screen by means of 
mirrors. Viewers use polaroid glasses and individual ear- 
phones to see and hear the program of their choice, per- 
mitting 2 groups of viewers to watch separate programs 
on same set in same room. DuMont plans to produce 30-40 
of the sets (which will carry list of about $2000) for dis- 
play throughout country. “If there’s enough demand,” 
said Dr. Allen B. DuMont, “we’ll make regular production 
models.” These would retail at about $600. 

More than 35% of TV sets produced in Nov. were 
equipped with built-in uhf tuners, reports RETMA, mark- 
ing continued increase in rate of uhf set production. Of 
560,197 receivers made in Nov., 197,311 had uhf tuners. 
For first 11 months of 1953, sets built to receive uhf 
totaled 1,319,818, out of total of 6,765,000 sets produced. 
This does not include sets converted in field with con- 
verters, strips, etc. For first 7 months of 1953, uhf- 
equipped sets were about 15% of total industry output; 
in August they accounted for 15.6%, Sept. 25%, Oct. 30%. 

Blasting TV dealers who charge “Cadillac prices” for 
uhf conversions, theatre owner Walter Reade Jr., pres, of 
Asbury Park’s new WRTV (Ch. 58) called overcharges 
“shortsighted business and detrimental to the entire TV 
industry.” He said station has received complaints that 
some dealers are asking $75 or more and pointed out that 
several local firms are offering guaranteed conversions at 
$24.50-$29.50, including strip or converter, antenna, lead- 
in and labor charges. Some in Asbury Park area are 
advertising “no money down” and easy payments on con- 
version. 

Standard Coil Products Co. consolidates midwest oper- 
ation? for greater efficiency, equipping West Roscoe plant 
in Chicago to manufacture coils and motors for civilian 
and govt, use, closing down oldest Chicago plant. Melrose 
Park, 111., plant, now being enlarged, and Aurora, 111., plant 
will handle TV tuner production. 

Hoffman Radio’s “Ice Maiden” floral float, depicting 
scene from Hans Christian Andersen fable, won first prize 
in commercial division of Jan. 1 Tournament of Roses 
Parade. 



Financial & Trade Notes: Among officers’ and direc- 

tors’ stock transactions reported by SEC for Nov.: Wm. I. 
Myers bought 200 Avco, holds 400; Benjamin Abrams trust 
bought 800 Emerson, he holds 297,239 directly and through 
ti’usts and foundations; Max Abrams trust bought 200 
Emerson, he holds 153,000 directly and through trusts 
and foundations; Edward J. Kelly bought 500 Emerson 
(Oct.), holds 500; Harvey Tullo bought 500 Emerson, 
holds 3178; Y. Frank Freeman sold 100 Paramount, holds 
1700 ; George D. Kasten and wife sold 300 Standard Coil 
Products (Oct.), holds 50; Don G. Mitchell sold 250 Syl- 
vania, holds 3231; Paul J. Hemschoot bought 100 Tung-Sol, 
holds 400; Milton R. Schulte bought 100 Tung-Sol, holds 
2145; Jean E. Witbeck bought 100 Tung-Sol, holds 3051. 

C. Russell Feldman, pioneer radio company organizer 
and financier, has engineered sale of Eureka-Williams 
Corp., Bloomington, 111. (vacuum cleaners, oil burners, 
etc.) to Henney Motor Co., Freeport, 111., of which he is 
pres. & chief stockholder. Deal is said to involve $400,- 
000 cash, plus assumption of various obligations. B. C. 
Milner has been appointed executive asst, to Mr. Feld- 
man, as pres, of Henney, and Eureka’s ex-pres. H. W. 
Burritt continues on consulting basis. Feldman founded 
old Simplex Radio Corp., Sandusky, 0., later acquired by 
Philco; founded old Detrola Corp.; is board chairman of 
National Union Radio Corp.; chairman & pres.. Strong, 
Carlisle & Hamilton Co., Cleveland; chairman of Oneida 
Products Corp., Canastota, N. Y.; director of Textileather 
Corn., Toledo, and Merchandise National Bank, Chicago. 

Raytheon sales increased to $81,177,000 in 6 months 
ended Nov. 30 from $78,786,927 in same 1952 period, but 
net profit dropped to $1,639,000 (71<^ a share) from $1,912,- 
800 (83^). Pres. Charles F. Adams Jr. said backlog of 
orders totaled about $185,000,000, with govt, billings con- 
tinuing to average about 70% of total volume. Current 
production volume, he added, has eliminated most over- 
time operations. 

Magnavox sales for the 6 months ended Dec. 31 ex- 
ceeded $35,500,000, up 37% from same period year ago, 
reports pres. Frank Freimann. TV shipments in Dec. were 
actually greater than Nov., normally year’s peak, he stated, 
forecasting continued high level into 1954. 

Muler Co. and subsidiaries report for 10 months ended 
Oct. 31 sales of $12,831,269, net income of $375,978 (57(J 
a share). No direct comparison is available, but for 9 
months ended Sept. 30, 1952, sales were $8,691,609, profit 
$256,555 (39d). 

B 

RCA board promoted 4 executives this week — 3 of 
them moving from Camden to N. Y. They’re v.p. Joseph 
B. Elliott, elected exec. v.p. of new consumer products div. 
of parent company; v.p. W. Walter Watts, now exec, v.p., 
new electronic products div.; v.p. Charles M. Odorizzi, 
now exec. v.p. in charge of newly consolidated corporate 
staff serving all units and subsidiaries of RCA. In addi- 
tion, Dr. E. W. Engstrom was upped to exec. v.p. in 
charge of RCA Laboratories div., headquartering in 
Princeton. Concommitant shifts and changes at Camden 
will be announced later. 

Rear Adm. Frederick R. Furth, Navy ex-asst. chief of 
Bureau for Electronics, named chief of Naval Research, 
succeeding Rear Adm. Calvin M. Bolster, retired. Capt. 
T. W. Rogers, ex-asst. director for electronics, takes over 
Adm. Furth’s former post until Feb., when Capt. Rawson 
Bennett becomes asst, chief of Bureau for Electronics. Dr. 
Ernst Henry Krause named associate research director. 
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, succeeding Dr. 
F. N. D. Kurie, now superintending scientist of Naval 
Electronics Laboratory, San Diego. 



14 



Telecasting Notes: The tv gratuity racket, subject of 
strongly worded editorial in Nov. 30 Advertising Age (Vol. 
9:49), drew another attack this week in form of letter to 
that trade journal commending it for “excellent reporting 
of a very bad situation [which] can prove ruinous for 
everyone in the industry.” Max Banzhof, adv. mgr. of 
Armstrong Cork Co., sponsoring Armstrong Circle Thea- 
tre, on NBC-TV, sent copies to Paul B. West, ANA pres., 
to BBDO pres. Ben Duffy and to heads of all 4 networks 
. . . “There is no more reason,” he states, “to extend gra- 
tuities to production personnel than there is to extend them 
to network salesmen who also do an excellent job in behalf 
of their clients. Yet I am sure any salesman accepting a 
weekly gratuity from a client would be dismissed from the 
network payrolls. The gratuity practice also contributes 
substantially to the generally prevailing attitude that any 
advertiser who can afford to use TV has an almost bound- 
less storehouse of funds to pay for not only necessities but 
an endless variety of frivolities . . .” Network chiefs were 
reluctant to comment, though Advertising Age does quote 
ABC v.p. Alexander Stronach as saying, “It is a vicious 
practice carried over from the infancy of radio.” Another 
top netwox-k executive, asking not to be quoted by name 
“because I can’t blast the advertiser in my job,” said: “The 
plain fact of the matter is that the sponsor makes this 
situation. The networks take a dim view of gratuities. 
The situation breeds discontent, arrogance on the part of 
a few, and makes the crew distinctly difficult to live with.” 
... As examples of the throwback to radio. Advertising 
Age states that General Foods used to pay the CBS pro- 
duction man and engineer “to give a little extra some- 
thing” on the old Kate Smith show, and Bristol-Myers 
gave Fred Allen’s engineer $50 every week it sponsored 
his radio show . . . Recent newspaper strike in New York 
boosted TV-radio news audiences significantly, according 
to Pulse report for first week in Dec., which shows 23% 
gain in TV news audiences over Nov. level, 15% boost in 
radio; 12 metropolitan N. Y. counties were included in sur- 
vey, though strike was confined to the 5 N. Y. City bor- 
oughs . , . New WRTV, Asbury Park, N. J. (Ch. 58), still 
testing, has given free time to 5 manufacturers — Channel 
Master, Philco, RCA, Sylvania, Zenith — to put on films and 
slides to help promote uhf; RCA has put on film of its 
experimental uhf at Bridgeport, Zenith its Fog Over Port- 
land, relating story of uhf in that city . . . Entire day’s 
racing at Santa Anita, as called and narrated by Joe Her- 
nandez, is being carried on film 5 nights weekly on KTTV, 
Los Angeles, under title Santa Anita Races . . . Peter Lind 
Hayes and wife Mary Healy have signed exclusive long- 
term TV-radio contracts with CBS . . . Ziv signs Red Skel- 
ton to 3-year contract to star in daily filmed open-end 
series for syndication; first 26 weeks will be released 
March 1. 

m 

Tclenews daily TV newsfilm service, along with its 
weekly syndicated News Digest and Sports Digest, has 
been acquired by Hearst Metrotone News Inc., owned 
jointly by Loew’s Inc. (MGM) and the Hearst Corp., in 
deal concluded this week between Herbert Scheftel, pres, 
of Telenews Productions Inc., and Seymour Berkson, INS 
gen. mgr. acting for Hearst. Telenews maintains own 
identity, with Charles N. Burris continuing as gen. mgr. 
but with INS-TV sales mgr. Robert H. Reid heading sales. 
Alfred G. Burger, associated with Mr. Scheftel in owner- 
ship of several TV stations, continues as exec, v.p.; Robert 
Schofield, commercial film production mgr.; Charles Dolan, 
TV film program mgr.; Ed Lewis, sales mgr. 

Only AT&T interconnection this week was WAYS-TV, 
Charlotte, N. C., which got first network service Jan. 5. 
Next to be interconnected probably will be WRDW-TV, 
Augusta, Ga.; KNUZ-TV, Houston; KCEB, Tulsa. 



College football TV controls will continue in 1954, 
probably very little changed from last year’s game-a-week 
pattern. NCAA convention in Cincinnati Jan. 8 by vote 
of 172-9 approved 56-p. report by 1953 TV committee 
hailing last year’s TV program as “the most successful 
we ever had” and recommending similar setup for 1951. 
Though new TV committee, yet to be appointed, will have 
the final say, outgoing committee urged that “serious 
study” be given possibility of imposing outright ban on 
all exceptions to TV restrictions. Committee was refer- 
ring to the 11 exceptions made in 1953 permitting regional 
televising of sellout games. New committee is permitted 
to decide for itself whether to permit televising of games 
on regional rather than national basis, and whether to let 
any team appear more than once on TV. But judging 
by mood of convention, it more likely will rule against 
any loosening of the restrictions. In round table discus- 
sion of TV Jan. 7, majority sentiment opposed Big Ten 
plan for regional telecasting, and Notre Dame athletic 
director Ed Krause found no support for his proposal to 
eliminate all restrictions. 

Two applications for new TV stations were filed with 
FCC this week, including another for Ch. 6 in Milwaukee 
suburb Whitefish Bay — this one by group including ex- 
Sen. Blair Moody (D.-Mich.), now in printing and pub- 
lishing business and moderator of Meet Your Congress 
on DuMont network. Also represented in same applica- 
tion are yarn & hosiery manufacturer Jack Kahn, sub- 
urban Detroit publisher Laurence Fleishman, a business 
associate of Mr. Moody, and publisher Robert K. Straws, 
Omnibook Magazine. Week’s other application was for 
Buffalo, Ch. 7 by WWOL (Leon Wyszatycki). There 
were 4 dismissals, bringing total applications pending to 
344 (70 uhf). [For further details about these applica- 
tions, see TV Addenda 18- A herewith; for complete list- 
ings of all grants, new stations, applications, etc., see TV 
Faetbook No. 18, due off presses next week.] 

Tran.sfer of KXLY-TV, Spokane (Ch. 4), along with 
radio KXLY, to new ownei-ship headed by chairman Joseph 
Harris, one of backers of film syndicator Motion Pictures 
for Television Inc., was approved by FCC Jan. 6, finalizing 
$1,723,500 sale deal (Vol. 9:49). Sellers are E. B. Craney, 
Bing Crosby, Mrs. Burton K. Wheeler, John L. Wheeler, et 
al. Conns. Hyde, Hennock & Bartley dissented, favoring 
letter of inquiry with respect to transferees’ plans relating 
to a prior contract. Richard E. Jones, ex-WJBK-TV, 
Detroit, recently mgr. of WABD, New York, takes over 
from Win. Craney as gen. mgr.; he owns 10% of new li- 
censee company. 

Power boosts & channel shifts: WRGB, Schenectady, 
changed over all equipment from Ch. 4 to Ch. 6, upped 
power from 16 to 93-kw ERP in 7 hours between midnight 
signoff Jan. 3 and start of day’s programming Jan. 4. 
WTVR, Richmond (Ch. 6), this week upped power from 
17.2 to 100 kw. WJBK-TV, Detroit (Ch. 2), Jan. 12 be- 
gins telecasting from 1057-ft. antenna on 9-mile & South- 
100 kw. KSTM-TV, St. Louis, (Ch. 36), Jan. 7 went to 
275-kw ERP. 



Index to 1953 Newsletters 
Included herewith, to all subscribers, is the an- 
nual Index to contents of all 1953 Newsletters, Sup- 
plements, Special Reports, etc. — providing handy 
device for locating major events, trends, dates, etc. 
Bound volumes of all these publications can be made 
available on order at $25 per copy. 





MARTIN CODEL’s 

AUTHORITATIVE NEV/S SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY RADIO NEWS nREAU [^WTATT BLOfi. • WASHINGTON S. D.C. • TELEPHONE STERUN6 3-1755 • VOL. 10: No. 3 



i 



JAN ^ ^S54 January 16, 1954 



in this 
issue: 



More Changing Ownerships & Affiliations, page 1 
Pensacola and East Lansing Starters, page 2 
VHF Grants Dominate Week's Output, page 3 
More Private Network Facilities Used, page 4 
. Color Momentum Faster Than Predicted, pages 6 & 7 



Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 8 
European TV — Progress and Plans, page 8 
This Was Retailers' Week in TV Trade, page 9 
Operating Techniques of Dealers Described, page 10 
RCA's Sublicensing Rights Sustained, page 12 



NEW TV FACTBOOK, NAP AND AM-FN LOG: We send our subscribers this week TV Factbook 
No. 18, latest of the semi-annual reference series often called the " bible of the 
industry . " With it goes our 1954 TV Map, 43x29-in. , in color, showing all TV cities, 
all existing and projected AT&T & private network facilities, all cities peculiar 
to the TV allocation plan, all other cities over 10,000 pop. 

Also in the mails to our TV-AM-FM subscribers is the 1954 AM-FM Directory , 
logging all U.S. stations and applications, plus all Canadian, Mexican, Cuban & other 
North American radio stations — by states & cities, and separately by frequencies. 



Highlights of 574-p. Factbook are the data on all TV stations — facilities, 
personnel, rates, etc. (some 150 more stations than in last edition) ; on TV networks , 
with personnel and rate cards; on TV stations in foreign countries ; the directories 
of advertising agencies , national sales reps , TV program sources ; the lists of CPs 
outstanding for new stations and all applications pending as of Jan. 1, 1954; owner - 
ship of stations by categories (multiple, network, newspaper, etc.); and directories 
of TV receiver, tube, antenna, tuner, converter and station equipment manufacturers . 

There are also directories of FCC , attorneys , consulting engineers & other 
consulting services, major electronic labs , community antenna systems . theatre-TV 
installations and firms, market research organizations, trade associations , labor 
unions; and bibliographies of the literature and periodicals in the TV-radio fields. 

Brought up-to-date are statistical tables summarizing 1953 and preceding 
years' FCC, PIB and other reports on network & station revenues, expenses , etc. ; set 
& tube production, sales & shipments ; financial data on leading TV-radio-electronic 
manufacturers — all handily available for quick and easy reference. 

Every full-service subscriber gets one copy of TV Factbook with one map in 
next week's mails; extra Factbooks cost $3, maps |1. AM-FM Directory goes only to 
full TV-AM-FM subscribers; extra copies, $7.50. Our weekly Addenda services are 
designed to keep these directories up-to-the-minute for those who subscribe to them. 



MORE CHANGING OWNERSHIPS & AFFILIATIONS: You will be hearing about more big TV st a- 
tion deals in ensuing months — sparked to new impetus and high prices by Storer's 
$10,000,000 purchase last week of Empire Coil Co. and its Cleveland and Portland 
stations (Vol. 10:2). You also will read in the trade press about more and more AM 
station transfers, big and little, many of them forced by TV acquisitions. 

Then there will be the continued jockeying of networks for favorable local 
positions in TV, as happened in AM, with CBS & NBC the prime competitors while every- 
body in the industry roots for ABC & DuMont to come along (as they are now doing). 

Fortunately for the business of telecasting , buyers of TV stations up to now 
for the most part have been "professional" broadcasters or telecasters about whose 
good operating records, as in the case of Storer, the FCC knows a lot. 

There's plenty of pure investment money also seeking outlets in fabulous TV, 



COPYRIGHT iaS4 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



- 2 - 

and the disposition at FCC is to look twice at them — especially if it suspects 
quick purchase-&-sale intentions. Chairman Hyde puts it this way: "We like to think 
of TV and radio as services in their own rights, as professions of those who operate 
them. The record shows we have invariably favored that kind of operation, especially 
by local interests and by integrated ov;nership and management ." 

It's significant , however, that the FCC seldom has turned down any transfer. 
Hyde joined with Comrs. Bartley & Hennock in dissenting to last v/eek's approved sale 
of Spokane's KXLY-TV & KXLY (Vol. 10:2), proposing further inquiry, but so far as 
we can recall the only outright denial of transfer was in 1949 when FCC refused to 
allow Crosley to buy out Louisville Courier-Journal's WHAS-TV & WHAS for $1,975,000 
(Vol. 5:10,39) — and that one was decided on grounds of overlapping AM coverage. 

Only major deal still pending that has been publicly disclosed is proposed 
acquisition of 49% or more of KPIX, San Francisco by Westinghouse (Vol. 9:45), still 
in negotiation stage. But more are coming along, for it's an open secret that such 
entities as CBS, Westinghouse, DuMont, Crosley, Time Inc., Hulbert Taft Jr., Scripps- 
Howard, Wrather-Alvarez and others are eager to own allowable 5 vhf, if not 2 uhf. 

Only revealable sale definitely in offin g is one Storer will have to make 
in order to justify his acquisition of Cleveland's WXEL (vhf) ; already ov/ning 5 vhf, 
he will sell either his Atlanta or Birmingham properties. San Antonio outlets are 
likely to be retained, because son George B. Storer Jr. is resident manager. 

It's reasonable to assume , too, that in line with his policy of having AM 
counterparts with TV, Storer v/ill acquire a radio station in Cleveland . Logically, 
that would be WGAR, CBS affiliate there, which recently was sold for $1,000,000 to 
Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. (Vol. 9:50, 10:1). It can be assumed also on basis 
of past he will seek CBS-TV affiliation in Cleveland , now WEWS (Scripps-Howard) . 

* * * * 

Combinations and mergers to get into TV have forced disposition of many AM 
properties to prevent local duopolies, and the station brokers have enjoyed a harvest 
since freeze was lifted — usually finding ready buyers for AM properties. In some 
cases, AM owners have been willing to sell simply out of fear of TV's encroachments. 

Latest big AM sale is KPOA, Honolulu (5 kw on 630 kc, MBS), sold by broker 
Howard Stark for J. Elroy McCaw & John D. Keating this week; price is $400,000 and 
the buyer is Radio Hawaii Inc., subsidiary of Tele-Trip Inc., N.Y. aviation insurance 
specialists, headed by John M. Shaheen and including Eugene duPont III as a director. 
Exec. v.p. is Finley Hollinger, now gen. mgr. of the station. McCaw and Keating had 
to sell in order to justify their half ovmership of KONA (TV) there (Vol. 9:13,23). 

* * * * 

Things have been quiet along the network affiliation battlefront since CBS's 
last foray, resulting in taking Buffalo's WBEN-TV & WBEN away from NBC (Vol. 9:42) 
and the defection a few months earlier of Norfolk's WTAR-TV & WTAR (Vol. 9:20-22,27). 
This week, NBC signed upcoming KDAL-TV, Duluth, Minn . (Ch. 3), due on air in March. 
Its AM has long been a CBS affiliate, presumably will eventually also go to NBC. The 
move was dictated mainly by fact that CBS is 47% owner (with Ridder newspapers) of 
WCCO-TV & WCCO, Minneapolis — and the Ridders hold CP for WDSM-TV, Duluth-Superior 
(Ch. 6), also due on air in March. 

New and changing ownerships will often mean changing network affiliations, as 
they have in the past — that and the prospect of color: v/hich network offers most. 
From where we sit, it looks like the " color revolution " will mean far more changes 
in station values in future than anything we've seen yet. 

PENSACOLA & EAST LANSING STARTERS: Only 2 new stations took the air this week — 

the first vhf in Pensacola, Fla , and Michigan State College's educational uhf in 
East Lansing, Mich . Several more are due to begin testing momentarily, but weather 
and other delays are being encountered by many. Expected to start any day now are 
WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich . (Ch. 5) and KCEB, Tulsa. Okla . (Ch. 23), among others; new 
KRGV-TV, Weslaco, Tex . (Ch. 5) ran into delays, now has Jan. 25 test target. 

There are now 359 stations on air , of which 124 are uhf — which means that 
only 3 new stations have started thus far this year. This week's starters : 



- 3 - 

WEAR-TV, Pensacola, Fla . (Ch. 3) began operation Jan. 13, using 10-kw RCA 
transmitter with 6-section superturnstile. It's first vhf in city, nearest other 
being in Mobile, 53 mi. to northwest. City's WPFA-TV (Ch. 15) began operating last 
Oct. 9. Station's owners are Charles W. Smith, 51%, v.p. & gen. mgr. Mel Wheeler 
holding 25%. Commercial mgr. is Tom Bloski, program mgr. Jerry Williams, chief en- 
gineer Jim Smith — virtually same personnel that operates WJDM, Panama City, Fla . 
(Ch. 7), which is 96 mi. due eastward and which began Dec. 1 but is owned by other 
interests. WEAR-TV went commercial Jan. 14 with |300 base rate. Rep is Hollingbery. 

WKAR-TV, East Lansing, Mich . (Ch.60), which will operate as a non-commercial 
educational station though it occupies a commercially allocated channel, began test 
patterns Jan. 13 with 12-kw GE transmitter, started regular programming Jan. 15. It 
is operated by Michigan State College under direction of Dr. Armand L. Hunter , with 
J.D. Davis as operations mgr. ; J. Kenneth Richards, program mgr. ; James B. Tintera, 
production mgr. ; Linn P. Towsley, chief engineer. It's first uhf in pre-freeze vhf 
area, was dedicated in the presence of many notables, including FCC Comr. Doerfer, 
Ford Foundation's C. Scott Fletcher, Penn State College pres. Milton Eisenhower. 
Pioneer in educational TV , Michigan State since 1951 has produced TV shows on closed 
circuit from studios atop its Electrical Engineering Bldg. ; it has turned out 750 
shows, furnished more than 500 kines to Michigan's commercial stations. 

Note ; CBC's oft-deferred second Montreal station CBMT (Ch. 6) got test signal 
on air Jan. 10, but equipment developed bugs and it's still awaiting official start. 

VHF GRANTS DOMINATE WEEK'S OUTPUT: Two CPs and 3 initial decisions were issued by 
FCC this week — all of them vhf, all except one resulting from mergers or dropouts 
of competition. One CP was given up — WGCM-TV, Gulfport, Miss. (Ch. 56). The CPs ; 

Albany, Ga . , WALB, Ch. 10; Ribbing, Minn . , North Star TV Co., Ch. 10. The 
initial decisions lined up following for CPs: Sioux City, la . , KCOM, Ch.4; Houston . 
Houston TV Co. Inc., Ch. 13; Durham, N.C ., WTIK, Ch. 11. 

Albany CP came after competitor James Rivers dismissed . Ribbing applica- 
tion was uncontested; new grantee is owned by several stockholders, including some 
with minor holdings in WTCN-TV, Minneapolis, and WSPT(AM), Stevens Point, Wis. ; 
they're headed by St. Paul ad agency owner Q.J. David. 

Initial decision favored KCOM, Sioux City , after KSCJ dropped out under an 
agreement allowing it to buy 50%; KCOM must be sold. WTIK, Durham , was set up for 
CP after merger agreement with WDNC ; WTIK will be disposed of. In big Houston deal , 
there's agreement among KTRH, KTHT, Houston Area TV Co., Houston TV Co., to share 
ownership 32%, 16%, 32% & 20%, respectively, with Mayor Roy Hofheinz to sell his 
ownership in KTHT. Another application was primed for initial decision when Capital 
TV Inc., Charleston, W.Va . . dismissed, leaving WCSH free for grant; Capital is 
enabled to acquire 40% of CP when issued. 

* * * * 

FCC's multiple ownership proposal , which would permit owners of 5 vhf sta- 
tions to acquire 2 uhf (Vol. 9:52), came under l oud attack from Sen. Edwin Johnson 
(D-Colo.), who flailed away with his old-time vigor. 

" This brazen monopoly proposal ," he charged, must be due to the “pressure of 
selfish groups." He said Commission based its proposal on no facts , least of all 
on its study of post-freeze stations which, in itself, gave no indication that uhf 
is in need of kind of help offered by new multiple ownership proposal (Vol. 10:1). 

Johnson wondered how proposal could help such things as the "shocking situa- 
tion" in Monroe, La. He said city has 2 TV assignments, one vhf, one uhf. Uhf 
station got on air first, he said, yet all 4 networks affiliated with the vhf. 

This "illogical turn-coat proposal " should be suspended, he said, until FCC 
"has explored fully all problems that directly affect the operation of uhf." The 
situation, the Senator warned, "would be an interesting subject for Congressional 
inquiry." No one else has filed comments yet; they're due Feb. 1. 

♦ * * * 

FCC also got crack on knuckles from Court of Appeals , which issued stay order 
restraining Commission from holding 4-way competitive hearing for St. Louis' Ch. 11, 



4 



pending appeal by KSTM-TV, St. Louis (Ch. 36), seeking to be considered for the vhf 
channel. Court said FCC could vacate the stay order by either letting KSTM-TV into 
hearing or by giving it a hearing to determine its right to enter hearing. Waiting 
out court actions and subsequent appeals could cause endless delays, so in future 
it’s likely FCC will at least hold oral argument on similar petitions, to show that 
petitioner got chance to be heard. 

Commission probably invited another appeal this week when it turned down the 
petition of WBUF-TV , Buffalo (Ch. 17) to intervene in Ch. 2 "strike" filing case 
(Vol. 10:2). FCC said petition was "fatally defective in not sufficiently stating 
the nature of facts it proposes to develop at hearing" and that station was more 
concerned with delaying new vhf station than in protecting the public interest. 

In several allocations actions , the FCC: (1) Turned down the petition of KIT, 
Yakima, for addition of Ch. 2 or 3 on grounds of substandard spacing with Canadian 
channels. (2) Dismissed petition of John H. Phipps, Tallahassee, for shift of Ch. 9 
from Dothan, Ala., to Tallahassee, because it was contingent on proposed "5-mile" 
rule which has been discarded (Vol. 9:52). Received this week was petition from 
Clair L. Taylor, Michigan Supt. of Public Instruction, asking educational channels 
for Kalamazoo, Alpena, Marquette, Houghton, Escanaba — channels unspecified. 

MORE PRIVATE NETWORK FACILITIES USED: Stations providing their ov;n network service , 
via microwave or direct off-air pickups, have increased substantially in the last 6 
months. Considering tremendous increase in stations, scattered all over the coun- 
try, it's a tribute to AT&T's planning and performance that more stations aren't 
providing their own interconnecting facilities. 

Many stations would just as soon take care of themselves, feeling they can 
provide service more cheaply. On other hand, some stations have been relieved when 
phone company came along and took a lot of headaches off their hands. 

Stations don't have free rein , of course, in providing own facilities. FCC 
rules permit stations to do so only when AT&T can't; furthermore, stations must give 
up facilities within "reasonable" time when AT&T indicates ability to come through. 

Comparing our previous TV map of July 15, 1953 with the one accompanying TV 
Factbook 18 (latter now in the mails), we find more private connections added than 
dropped in the 6 months period. As of Jan. 1, stations in 23 cities had own links. 
Latest CP for private microwave, issued this week, went to WEAU-TV, Eau Claire. Wis ., 
which plans to relay signals from Minneapolis and Rochester, Minn. 

Most common type of link comprises a single receiving-transmitting point 
somewhere between originating and receiving stations. It picks a good vhf or uhf 
signal out of the air, converts it to microwave, beams it to destination where it 
is rebroadcast. In some cases, AT&T itself provides the microwave station, making 
system half private and half common carrier. 

Another type is the several-link full-fledged system employed by WSM-TV , 
Nashville, from Louisville, and by WSAZ-TV , Huntington, from Columbus. Yet another 
is the simple direct out-of-the-air pickup — no microwave. 

In some cities , one station may be served by AT&T, another by own facilities 
as in Bakersfield and Nashville. But FCC says all must go to Bell System even- 
tually. In last few months, for example, WKZO-TV , Kalamazoo, and WOOD-TV , Grand 
Rapids, switched to AT&T; latter obtained service just in time for Jan. 1 Tourna- 
ment of Roses Parade. On other hand, WICC-TV , Bridgeport, dropped AT&T service to 
rely on direct pickup of New York stations. 

That FCC regards private links as temporary is emphasized by fact that sta- 
tions seeking them must show that AT&T is unable to supply service. Commission pro- 
vides no special frequencies for the service, merely permits stations to use bands 
ordinarily employed for studio-transmitter links and remotes. AT&T has own exclu- 
sive frequencies for intercity relays. When stations must switch to AT&T is deter- 
mined on case-to-case basis; some have been given 2 years to amortize equipment. 

No FCC license is required for off-air pickups which involve no microwave, 
though Commission requires that pickup station obtain permission of originating sta- 
tion and notify FCC of arrangement. However, there have been some cases of "boot- 
legging" — rebroadcasts of signals without permission. But no originating station 



- 5 - 

has kicked about it to FCC, so far, probably because it's usually a well-established 
big-city station and the "pirate" is generally a hard-up small-town newcomer. 

Quality of private service varies considerably. Some stations say their 
systems give them all they need ; others concede AT&T superiority. A disadvantage 
of some types of private links, particularly off-air, is that they don't provide the 
flexibility phone company can assure. 



Personal Notes: Charles H. Phillips, director of sales of 
WNBK, Cleveland, Feb. 1 becomes sales mgr. of WOR-TV, 
N. Y.; Wm. P. Dix Jr., sales mgr. of WTAM, Cleveland, 
takes same post at WOR. They replace Robt. C. Mayo, 
director of sales of WOR-TV & WOR, and John F. Sloan 
& Wm. Crawford, respective TV-radio sales mgi'S., re- 
signed . . . Donald A. Stewart, ex-DuMont receiver sales 
and onetime mgr. of WDTV, Pittsburgh, appointed gen. 
mgr. of DuMont’s recently acquired KCTY, Kansas City 
. . . Dick Campbell, program director, promoted to station 
mgr. of KOTV, Tulsa . . . Klaus Landsberg, gen. mgr. of 
KTLA, Los Angeles, awarded citation at reception Jan. 14 
by National Vocational Guidance Assn, at U of So. Cali- 
fornia “for pioneer production of public information pro- 
grams” . . . AVm. W. Bryan, Detroit mgr., elected v.p. of 
Free & Peter's . . . Wm. Balaban, director of sports & 
special events, assumes duties of asst, program mgr. under 
program director Ardien B. Rodner, WABC-TV, N. Y. . . . 
Malcolm B. Laing, ABC-TV sales dept, business mgr., ap- 
pointed N. Y.-New England-Canadian regional mgr., ABC- 
TV station relations dept. . . . Robt. P. Canavan, ex-KROD, 
El Paso, recently with MCA, joins ABC-TV as specialist 
in market coverage . . . Samuel Goldwyn Jr. resigned as 
TV producer with CBS to form own TV film producing con- 
cern in Hollywood, with offices now at 1270 Sixth Ave., 
N. Y. . . . Miss Duncan MacDonald resigns Jan. 18 as Du- 
Mont women’s program supervisor to handle part of NBC- 
TV’s new Home partic. show . . . Warren Park, ex-WJAR- 
TV, Providence, appointed program mgr., WFMJ-TV, 
Youngstown . . . William Ramble, ex-national sales mgT., 
KLAC-TV, Los Angeles (now KCOP), named western .sales 
mgr., Vitapix Corp.; Darrell Ross, ex-ABC-TV production 
mgr., named production director of KCOP . . . Richard 
Fichthorn, ex-v.p., WHUM-TV, Reading, Pa., joins Ted 
Black Agency, Reading . . . Deuel Richardson, TV-radio 
director of New England Council, named managing editor 
of its monthly magazine The New Englander . . . Frank F. 
Rathmell, ex-Westinghouse, named personnel mgr., Storer 
Bestg. Co., Miami headquarters . . . Paul Albert, WSYR- 
AM engineer, promoted to technical supervisor of WTRI, 
Schenectady (Ch. 35), due on air in Feb.; Fred D. Shaver, 
ex-WOI-TV, Ames, la., named program & production mgr. 
. . . Leo E. Persselin, ex-WOI-TV, named program direc- 
tor of WBAY-TV, Green Bay, Wis. . . . Robert B. Hudson, 
U of Illinois director of broadcasting, has resigned to be- 
come program coordinator of new TV-radio center financed 
by Ford Foundation’s fund for adult education at U of 
Michigan . . . Wm. H. Brown Jr., ex-Young & Rubicam 
production supervisor, joins CBS-TV to direct Life With 
Father . . . Robert Tucker, ex-Biow, named TV-radio di- 
rector, Calkins & Holden, Carlock, McClinton & Smith . . . 
Ted J. Grunewald, ex-Wm. Esty & Co., named TV-radio 
business mgr., Hicks & Greist . . . Frederick O. Eckert 
upped to head traffic section of N. W. Ayer radio-TV dept. 

. . . Jerome B. Harrison promoted to eastern sales mgr., 
ABC-TV, succeeding Stanley Smith, now on special sales 
. . . Jack Denninger named eastern sales mgr., Blair-TV Inc. 
■ 

Academy of TV Arts & Sciences, Hollywood, this week 
elected Don DeFore pres., succeeding Charles Ruggles. 
Other.^ elected: Hal Hudson, 1st v.p.; Robt. J. Black, 2nd 
v.p.; Shirley Thomas, secy.; Tom McCray, treas.; Gale 
Storm, recording secy.; Mildred Beach, corresponding secy. 



Confirmation of Corar. Robert E. Lee as FCC member 
appeared certain at week’s end, as Senate Commerce Com- 
mittee scheduled hearing on appointment Mon., Jan. 18. 
His nomination was sent to Senate by President Eisen- 
hower Jan. 11, and he is only witness scheduled to appear, 
with prospect of stiff cross-questioning by Democratic 
committee members. Pres. Joseph A. Bierne of Commu- 
nications Workers of America, as well as several CWA 
locals, v/rote committee asking open hearing, but didn’t 
ask to appear. Committee staff members said very few 
letters on the subject had been received, and up to Friday 
evening no one had requested to appear before committee. 

Changes in Republican membership of Senate Inter- 
state & Foreign Commerce Committee, which has charge 
of TV radio legislation, under chairman Bricker (R-0) : 
Sen. Capehart (Ind.) and Sen. Cooper (Ky.) this week 
left committee for assignments to Foreign Relations and 
Labor Committees, respectively. To fill these vacancies 
and that caused by death of Sen. Tobey (N. H.), these 
GOP Senators were added: James H. Duff (Pa.), Wm. A. 
Purtell (Conn.), Frederick G. Payne (Me.). Democratic 
membership remains same as last session, composition re- 
maining at 8 Republicans, 7 Democrats. 

Three principals of new KSLA, Shjreveport, La. (Ch. 
12) were among the 12 killed in crash of United Gas Co.’s 
private plane near Shreveport Jan. 10 while returning from 
a duck-hunting trip — the accident in which Braniff Airlines 
pres. T. E. Braniff was also killed. The 3, part owners of 
KCIJ, one of 3 applicants for Ch. 12, now temporarily 
combined in operation of KSLA pending FCC final decision 
(Vol. 9:52): Justin R. Querbes, insurance man, who with 
family owns 14.5%; Randolph A. Querbes, utilties man, 
14.5%; R. H. Hargrove, pipeline magnate, 3.6%. 

Martha Rountree’s mansion at Warrenton, Va., was 
destroyed by fire Jan. 12, and with it the 10,000-volume 
library she had purchased only a few days previously from 
estate of Louis G. Caldwell, onetime Washington radio 
attorney whose Washington home she leased until Jan. 1. 
Miss Rountree (Mrs. Oliver Presbrey) recently acquired 
the Colonial mansion and planned to move into it shortly. 

Split in Television WYiters of America broadened this 
week when east coast pres. Irve Tunick of the union re- 
signed because its western region didn’t fire exec. secy. 
Joan LaCour for refusing to answer questions of House 
Un-American Activities subcommittee in Los Angeles hear- 
ing last month. Tunick said large majority of eastern 15- 
member governing council will also quit. 

FCC Conir. George E. Sterling will address broadcast 
chapter of Boston IRE section at MIT Faculty Club Jan. 
28, speaking on “The Current Status of Uhf TV Broad- 
casting — With Some Color.” 

President Eisenhower has accepted an invitation to 
Radio & Television Correspondents Assn, annual dinner 
in Hotel Statler, Washington, Feb. 6. 

B 

Don Carney, 58, the Uncle Don of radio’s early juvenile 
shows, died in his sleep at Miami home Jan. 14. He had 
heart trouble, but the day before had conducted a show on 
WKAT. His real name was Howard Rice; he started in 
radio on KDKA in 1924, then went to WMAC in 1925 and 
WOR shortly thereafter, remaining in N. Y. until 1948. 



6 



Station Accounts: Canned Salmon Inc., starting in mid- 
Feb. and running for 10 weeks into Lenten season, has 
pooled 5 “partners” in big sales promotion drive which 
will use TV-radio along with newspapers, magazines and 
other media. Joining to advertise salmon-macaroni casse- 
role are Pet Milk Co., Campbell Soup Co., Macaroni Insti- 
tute, U. S. Steel Corp. and Can Manufacturers Institute 
. . . Duff Baking Mix Corp., 30 Broad St., Newark, owned 
by syndicate headed by Edward I. Baker, Frederick J. 
Briefer & J. B. Silberman, who recently purchased that 
division from Pillsbury Mills, plans extensive campaign, in- 
cluding TV-radio, thru Harry B. Cohen Adv., N. Y. . . . 
Broil-Quik Co., which started in TV with pitchman on 
WPIX, N. Y., now sponsors 4 local shows there, spends 
30% of its $750, 000 ad budget on TV, has jumped sales 
from less than $1,000,000 in 1950 to an anticipated $10,- 
000,000 this year, has increased distributors from 100 to 
835, plans to double ad budget next year and go into net- 
work TV, according to success story in Jan. 11 N. Y. 
Herald Tribune by Joseph Kaselow; agency for the infra- 
red broiler-rotisserie is Ziowe Co., N. Y. . . . Among other 
advertisers reported using or preparing to use TV: Nor- 
wegian Frozen Fish Ltd., Jersey City, N. J. (Frionor frozen 
fish), thru Creative Advertisers Service, Jersey City; 
Lanvin Parfums Inc. (My Sin perfume), thru Wesley 
Assoc., N. Y.; Stewart- Warner Corp., Chicago (Alemite 
lubricating system), thru MacFarland, Aveyard & Co., 
Chicago; Alliance Mfg. Co., Alliance, 0. (Alliance Tenna 
Rotor), thru Foster & Davies, Cleveland; E. I. Du Pont de 
Nemours & Co., Finishes Div. (Flokote paint), thru BBDO, 
N. Y.; Trade Winds Co., Thunderbolt, Ga. (Trade Winds 
frozen shrimp), thru Blaine-Thompson Co., N. Y.; Wolco 
Products Inc. (GlasSpray, Copper-Kleen, Lavatabs), thru 
Hicks & Greist, N. Y.; Norelco Shaver Div., North Ameri- 
can Phillips Co., for cooperative slogan contest, thru Grey 
Adv., N. Y. 



T otal billings of $ 8 , 000,000 are anticipated this 
year from NBC-TV’s 7-9 a.m Today — the same that 
drew such sharp barbs from the critics when first launched 
by Pat Weaver (now NBC pres.) just 2 years ago Jan. 
14. Dave Garroway and his troupe celebrated second birth- 
day this week by putting on James Bray, promotion mgr. 
of first sponsor, Kiplinger’s Changing Times Magazine, 
who first bought 13 spots offering free sample copies of 
the magazine, then renewed in fall of 1951, currently is 
using 13 more. Mr. Bray recounted how the samples re- 
sulted in 20% conversions into subscriptions. 

It was a costly show that even had the RCA-NBC 
hierarchy and station owners skeptical, as we discerned in 
our o\vn survey of reactions when it started and after- 
ward (Vol. 8:1,3,4,5,7,13,19,40) — for they had hard 
time at first selling national sponsors on the early-morning 
idea, let alone local adjacencies. No such difficulty exists 
now on the 51 stations carrying network TV’s biggest 
money show, v/hich grossed $5,000,000 its second year and 
used $800,000 worth of talent. 

Today, Today has a potential of $15,000,000 — maybe 
more, depending on added sponsors, outlets and rates — 
and its success has led NBC to launch a noonday partici- 
pating counterpart, due to start in March, titled Home. 
Of Today’s 16 saleable segments a day (80 a week), 39 
were sold this week, a seasonal dip from the nearly 100% 
before Xmas. In Jan.-March quarter, 58% of time has 
been sold, and for rest of year anticipated average of 55%.' 

Ninety accounts used Today for 83 individual cam- 
paigns in 1953, placed by 30 adv. agencies. Renewal rate 
is particular point of pride with its entrepreneurs, Nov.- 
Dee. being marked by renewals of 16 out of 17, including 
such major sponsors as General Motors, General Mills, GE, 
U. S. Rubber, Squibb, Smith Bros., Dow Chemical, Capital 
Airlines. They also cite latest Nielsen rating of 5.7-8 for 
2 weeks ended Dec. 12, claim 13-14,000,000 persons daily 
in 6,000,000 homes watch Today. 



C OLOR MOMENTUM appears to be growing faster 
: than commonly predicted. It becomes more and 
more clear that, once the color tube and receiver bottle- 
neck is broken, the snowball will develop into an avalanche. 

Though FCC’s color decision was cautious, almost pes- 
simistic, about ability of networks and stations to equip 
themselves for color, majority of viewers now live in 
range of stations so equipped. Some 25-30 stations, in 
biggest cities, are already able to rebroadcast network 
color; 50 more will be in next couple months. True, this 
doesn’t mean local color originations, except in a few 
cities, but it does mean that the most important segment 
of programming — network shows — can now be delivered 
in color to antennas of most viewers. 

Even local slide, film and live originations are likely 
to come along faster than expected. There are several 
manufacturers of slide and film equipment, and some 
stations are doing quite a lot of ingenious construction 
themselves. 

RCA is only source of live cameras, so far. This week 
it announced that it is now accepting orders for regular 
commercially-produced cameras, and that within mere 30 
days it would begin shipments of previously-'Ordered 
custom-built cameras to: WKY-TV, Oklahoma City; 

WBAP-TV, Ft. Worth; WBEN-TV, Buffalo; WTMJ-TV, 
Milwaukee; WCCO-TV, Minneapolis; KTLA, Los Angeles 
— plus several for NBC. 

On top of that, RCA will ship 12 complete camera 
chains and associated equipment to CBS. CBS spokes- 
man says this doesn’t mean it has dropped plans for 
type of camera equipment developed by v.p. Dr. Peter 
Goldmark. This employs field-sequential camera and an 
“encoding” unit which converts signal to NTSC specifi- 



cations (Vol. 9:4). Reason for placing the near-$l,000,000 
order with RCA, CBS says, is that it can’t get delivery 
of other equipment soon enough. GE is reportedly mak- 
ing 4 of the CBS-type for CBS. 

RCA is also stepping up its color indoctrination 
seminars, scheduling next one in Camden Jan. 25-26 for 
10 Western Electric engineers, 15 CBS, 19 NBC and 40 
other engineers from individual stations. 

Engineering effort and money going into production 
of RCA’s color transmitting equipment is greater than 
generally realized — transcending in many ways its most 
feverish work in black-&-white in previous years. 

DuMont will hold color TV symposium, along with 
transmitter clinic, for its district managers and regional 
sales representatives at Clifton, N. J. Jan. 18-22. Visitors 
will get glimpse at DuMont research div.’s developmental 
telecasting gear, will study and discuss new Colorvision 
slide scanner and Multi-Scanner film equipment. 

4(i ifi Hfi iti 

Color-interconnected stations will get a constantly 
growing supply of color programs, network spokesmen 
told this week’s meeting of National Appliance & Radio- 
TV Dealers Assn, in Chicago. NBC color coordinator 
Barry Wood gave this report on NBC’s color equip- 
ment: New York’s Colonial Theatre has 4 cameras, a 
slide scanner; Rockefeller Center’s Studio 3-H has 2 
cameras and a scanner; NBC stations in Los Angeles, 
Chicago & Washington are being equipped for originations ; 
one mobile unit is now in use, more under construction. 

Reiterating that all NBC sponsors will see their 
programs in color at least once this year. Wood said 
those currently scheduled are Your Hit Parade Jan. 16, 
Dinah Shore Show Jan. 19 & 21, Zoo Parade Jan. 31, Arm- 



7 



strong Circle Theatre Feb. 23 — others possibly sandwiched 
between some of these. 

CBS executive color producer Richard Lewine gave 
this schedule: First quarter, continue Fri. 5:30-6 “labora- 
tory” program now carried in New York & Baltimore, 
augment it by another regular half-hour show, both to be 
fed to more cities; second quarter, new color-equipped 
studio at 81st & Broadway will be in operation, originat- 
ing color premieres of such programs as Toast of the Town, 
Studio One, Arthur Godfrey, etc., with color film and 
remotes also to begin; third quarter, start of West Coast 
originations, including remotes. Demonstrations for agen- 
cies and sponsors will continue throughout. 

ABC’s Frank Marx was more cautious, stating that 
“much color equipment must still be invented” and that 
he was reserving recommendation on purchase until 
equipment has shaken down further. He said that pres- 
ent color film projectors will be obsolete; that there’s no 
satisfactory film projector available; that color tape is 
at least 2 years off. He also anticipated cost of AT&T 
facilities for color would be much greater than for black- 
&-white. 

DuMont Network gen. mgr. Jack Bachem said: “No- 
body can speak for the public and advertisers who will 
determine growth of color. We’ll make color programs 
available in accordance with advertisers’ willingness to 
pay.” He reported that one complete New York studio has 
been set aside for color. He also echoed Dr. DuMont’s 
statements that color awaits production of sets with larger 
screens. 

* * ♦ * 

Those who are bearish about color TV often note that 
movies haven’t converted heavily to color even though in- 
troduced years ago. There’s a tendency to overlook one 
huge difference — commercials. Advertisers are going to 
demand color, as color audience grows, as long as extra 
cost isn’t exhorbitant — and it’s not likely to be. 

Most convincing demonstration of color commercials’ 
impact was given this week by NBC Spot Sales in closed- 
circuit program fed to 10 cities and shown to select audi- 
ences of sponsors, agencies and newsmen. 

Extremely clever program showed, thanks to compati- 
bility, how color slide, film and live commercials can be 
integrated with black-&-white programs with no loss of 
black-&-white audience — and a startling impact for every 
color set in use. 

Obviously aimed primarily at dept, stores, particularly 
Gimbel’s and Macy’s, program was emceed by Ed Herlihy, 
featured Jinx Falkenburg, Faye Emerson, models, ballet 
dancer, etc. It included finest color film we’ve ever seen 
colorcast. Programs and commercials were shown in 
black-&-white then color was added, bringing exclamations 
from audience. 

Stations receiving program were WNBT, New York; 
WNBW, Washington; WNBK, Cleveland; WNBQ, Chi- 
cago; KSD-TV, St. Louis; KNBH, Los Angeles; KRON- 
TV, San Francisco; WWJ-TV, Detroit; WTMJ-TV, Mil- 
waukee; KDYL-TV, Salt Lake City — the list represented 
by NBC Spot Sales. 

Further evidence that color can’t help a poor show but 
can do wonders for commercials was adduced by TV critics 
John Crosby, Herald Tribune Syndicate, and Jack Could, 
New York Times. Both found Amateur Hour terrible, re- 
gardless of color. But cherry pie commercial, Crosby 
wrote, was “just plain terrific.” Could wrote: “The crust 
was golden brown and the fruit a deep red. It was the 
only thing on the show that had been left in the oven long 
enough.” 

Both Crosby and Could now have RCA color sets. 
Crosby first had a Westinghouse, Could an Emerson. 
Latter has turned Emerson over to his publisher Arthur 



Hays Sulzberger. Others with newly-installed RCA sets 
are Broadcasting-Telecasting magazine, and ourselves. 

It * * * 

Though color programming is still slim, some exciting 
events are in prospect. Besides putting regular programs 
on in color, NBC and CBS plan many special telecasts. 
NBC has mentioned possibility of New Orleans Mardi 
Gras, Washington Cherry Blossom Festival, Columbia 
River salmon run. At the moment, there’s some doubt 
about March 1 Mardi Gras, because part of route is coaxial 
cable which requires frequency conversion technique for 
which AT&T isn’t fully prepared. 

CBS hasn’t been specific, merely saying it plans spe- 
cial events, sports, etc. DuMont hasn’t indicated definite 
plans yet, though it’s considering color hookup of its sta- 
tions in New York, Pittsburgh & Washington. ABC, as 
Marx reported, is biding its time, though it’s bound to get 
into swim before long. 

* * * * 

Slow development of color, continued high value of 
black-&-white. That was theme of DuMont Network’s 
What’s The Story Jan. 14, featuring pres. Dr. Allen B. 
DuMont, research v.p. Dr. T. T. Goldsmith and Kenneth 
B. Willson, pres, of National Better Business Bureau. Dr. 
DuMont stated that system produces excellent pictures but 
that large-size screens in sets of reasonable cost won’t 
come for 2-3 years; that no single company developed sys- 
tem; that color programs will be few at first; that color 
sets are priced at $1000-$1200. Yet manufacturers “aren’t 
making any money” because sets cost $2000 to build. Dr. 
Goldsmith stated that conversion of black-&-white sets 
isn’t practical; that not even by 1960 will majority of pro- 
grams be in color; that color film, particularly of news 
events, will always be difficult; that color actually detracts 
from some types of programs. Mr. Willson wound up by 
stating that public’s investment in black-&-white is pro- 
tected by compatibility; that public can buy black-&-white 
now with confidence, needn’t delay purchase for fear of 
obsolescence. 

Network Accounts: Rybutol (vitamins) sponsors On 

Your Way, new quiz show featuring Arthur Godfrey’s 
sister Kathy, on ABC-TV starting Jan. 23, Sat. 7-7:30 
p.m., thru BBDO; it replaces Up for Adoption, which was 
scheduled to start on that date . . . Campbell Soup Co. to 
sponsor Grand Central Station on ABC-TV starting Jan. 
18, Mon.-thru-Fri. 11-11:25 a.m., thru Ward Wheelock 
Co., Philadelphia . . . Nestle’s to be alt. sponsor (with 
Ralston Purina) of Space Patrol on ABC-TV starting 
Jan. 16, Sat. 11-11:30 a.m., thru Cecil & Presbrey . . . 
Dodge cars to be alt. sponsor (with Lucky Strikes) of 
Danny Thomas Show on ABC-TV starting Feb. 26, Tue. 
8:30-9 p.m., thru Grant Adv. . . . Associated Products Inc. 
(5-Day Deodorant Pads) to be alt. sponsor (with Con- 
solidated Royal Chemical Corp.) of Arthur Murray Party 
on NBC-TV starting Jan. 18, Mon. 7:30-7:45 p.m., thru 
Grey Adv. . . . Ipana buys Tue. 2-2:15 p.m. portion of 
Garry Moore Show on CBS-TV starting Feb. 2 thru 
Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield. 



Annual TV program-talent awards of Radio-TV Daily, 
based on poll of 500 TV-radio editors: Man of the Year, 
Jack Webb, for Dragnet (NBC-TV) ; Woman of the Year, 
Lucille Ball, for 7 Love Lucy (CBS-TV) ; comedy, Colgate 
Comedy Hour (NBC-TV) ; variety. Toast of the Town 
(CBS-TV) ; drama, 77. S. Steel Hour (ABC-TV) ; musical. 
Voice of Firestone (NBC-TV) ; documentary. You Are 
There (CBS-TV); quiz, What’s My Line? (CBS-TV); 
children’s. Ding Dong School, (NBC-TV) ; commentator, 
Edward R. Murrow' (CBS-TV); sportscaster, Mel Allen 
(NBC-TV); disc jockey, Peter Potter (ABC-TV). 



8 



F ederal’s first 12 -kw uhf transmitter, utilizing new 
Eimac klystron, is now slated for delivery in April to 
WNAO-TV, Raleigh, N. C. (Ch. 28), using Federal 1-kw 
transmitter since it began operating last July. Intro- 
ductory date for DuMont’s 12-kw unit isn’t yet known, 
but first one reportedly will go to DuMont Network’s own 
newly-acquired KCTY, Kansas City (Ch. 25). 

Only transmitter shipments to upcoming new stations 
reported this week were 5-kw GE, which went out Jan. 11, 
to be followed by 20-kw amplifier Jan. 25, to WSLI-TV, 
Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 12), due on air in March; and 5-kw 
RCA to KDAL-TV, Duluth, Minn. (Ch. 3), also due in 
March. GE this week also shipped 20-kw amplifier to 
share-time WHEC-TV & WVET-TV, Rochester (Ch. 10). 

4 : 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

KGGO-TV, Enid, Okla. (Ch. 5), hasn’t begun construc- 
tion, but has ordered RCA equipment, plans start in May 
or June, reports pres. George Streets, local appliance 
dealer. Rep not yet chosen. 

KDRO-TV, Sedalia, Mo. (Ch. 6), now plans Feb. 15 
start with 5-kw GE transmitter, reports gen. mgr. Herb 
Brandes. Rep will be For joe. 

WSLI-TV, Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 12), now expects to 
have new TV building ready about Feb. 1 and equipment 
installed by March 15. It plans tests after that, going 
commercial April 1, reports TV operations mgr. Owens F. 
Alexander. L. M. Sepaugh will be gen. mgr. of WSLI-TV 
& WSLI; Evan Hughes, TV commercial mgr.; C. A. 
Perkins, chief engineer. It’s owned by Standard Life, and 
will be second vhf owned by insurance firm (Lamar Life’s 
WLBT began last Dec. 20) to compete with newspaper- 
owned WJTV (Ch. 25) which began Jan. 20, 1953. Rep 
will be Weed. 

WHO-TV, Des Moines (Ch. 13), has its 10-kw RCA 
transmitter, plans early March start, according to exec, 
v.p. Ralph Evans. It’s owned by Palmer interests, which 
also operate WOC-TV & AM, Davenport, and owns 259o 
of KMTV, Omaha. Rep not yet chosen. 



WARM-TV, Scranton, Pa. (Ch. 16), pushing for early 
completion of combined TV- AM studio building, has tower 
and antenna ready, is now installing RCA transmitting 
equipment, plans Feb. 9 commercial debut, reports gen. 
mgr. William M. Dawson. Hour rate will be $225. Rep 
will be Hollingbery. 

WEOK-TV, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (Ch. 21), given ex- 
tension to May after being cited by FCC, hasn’t ordered 
equipment as yet or begun construction, but plans start 
next June, according to pres. Arthur J. Barry Jr. Everett- 
McKinney will be rep. 

WTRI, Schenectady, N. Y. (C’n. 35), delayed in tower 
and antenna deliveries, now plans tests about Feb. 15 with 
12-kw GE transmitter, reports AVTRY gen. mgr. W. W. 
Carter Jr. Owners are Fabian theatre interests (Stanley 
Warner Corp.) and Col. Harry C. Wilder, founder and 
ex-owner of WSYR-TV, Syracuse, who operates WTRY, 
Troy. TV mgr. will be Richard B. Wheeler. Hour rate 
will be $200. Headley-Reed will be rep. 

WCOG-TV, Greensboro, N. C. (Ch. 57), earlier plan- 
ning Jan.-Feb. start, won’t get 5-kw DuMont transmitter 
until next Aug., so hopes now for target around Dec. 1, 
reports gen. mgr. Gilbert M. Hutchinson. Ownership inter- 
locks with WAYS-TV, Charlotte (Ch. 36), which began 
Dec. 7. Bolling will be rep. 

WKNY-TV, Kingston, N. Y. (Ch. 66), construction 
delayed by cold weather, now plans late Feb. start with 
RCA equipment and 600-ft. Stainless tower at Port Ewen, 
3 mi. from Kingston and 10 mi. from Poughkeepsie, ac- 
cording to TV operations mgr. Robert L. Sabin. Owner 
Joseph K. Close also has CP for Keene, N. H., which 
hasn’t set target date. Hour rate will be $100. Rep will 
be Meeker. 

♦ * * * 

CHSJ-TV, St. John, N. B. (Ch. 4), has transmitter 
building ready on Mt. Champlain for GE transmitter due 
Jan. 29, plans Feb. tests using 40-ft. Ajax tower, starts 
programming March 15, reports gen. mgr. G. A. Cromwell. 
Hour rate ufill be $165. Canadian rep will be All-Canada 
TV ; U. S. rep not yet chosen. 



E uropean tv took a big stride Jan. 3 when Italy 
began regular 36-hour weekly schedule on govt.- 
controlled stations in Milan, Rome and Turin. Italy has 
had TV on intermittent basis since 1951, and 5 more sta- 
tions are scheduled for formal opening next few months. 

On occasion of beginning of regular programming in 
Italy, Pope Pius called TV “both a precious and danger- 
ous instrument” in statement addressed to Italian bishops. 
He said “Television can serve to bring the family together 
again in the home and keep them from the dangers of 
unhealthy places” and can be beneficial to popular cul- 
ture and education, but he warned “it is also not with- 
out dangers because of the abuses and profanations for 
which it can be used.” He noted that TV is made up heav- 
ily of films and theatrical spectacles, “and the number 
that fully satisfy Christian morality is too small.” 

Italy is one of 9 nations studying idea of European 
network, which will be inaugurated next June with tele- 
cast of European soccer championships from Switzerland. 
Exploring possibilities of hooking into microwave and oflf- 
the-air circuit are Belgium, Denmark, France, West Ger- 
many, Britain, Holland and Sweden. 

Big electrical manufactui'er Philips of Eindhoven, 
Holland, has announced new univei’sal TV set for European 
areas where telecasts can be received from countries using 
4 different transmission standards. Incorporating 12-chan- 
nel tuner and 4-standard switch, receiver can pick up the 
standard European transmissions of 625 lines, negative 
picture canier modulation, FM sound; Belgian 625-line, 
positive modulation, AM sound, and French 819-line posi- 
tive AM system. With 17-in. tube, set retails for $355; 



regular single-system 17-in. 10-channel set sells for $288. 

Our new TV Factbook No. 18 features most complete 
information available on foreign TV, with lists of the 60 
stations now regularly and experimentally on air in 41 
countries, including location, operator, frequency, power 
and starting date of each, and foreign stations planned in 
future. Foreign countries with greatest number of sta- 
tions are: Cuba 10, Britain 8, Canada & W. Germany 7 
each, Mexico 6. 



“Multicon” camera chain, designed especially for low- 
budget stations, was showm for first time this week in 
Washington by Standard Electronics Corp., subsidiary of 
Claude Neon Inc. It’s first U. S. equipment to incorporate 
image iconoscope tube developed by Dutch Philips (VoL 
9:17) and widely used by Eui’opean TV stations. Camera 
chain, designed for live, film and slide use, is slated to be 
available in March at $12,000, Multicon tube at $525. 
Standard guarantees 600-line resolution, claims 40% lower 
initial cost than image orthicon, 80% lower operating cost, 
high sensitivity, light weight (72 lbs. with view-finder), 
quick warm-up time (60 sec). Life of developmental 
Multicon tube was more than 1500 hours. Tube will be 
made, in U. S. by Amperex Electronic Corp., Hicksville, 
L. I., and Standard will offer new chain as part of com- 
plete station package, including transmitter, tower, etc. 

DuMont expands into mobile radio communications 
equipment, with formation this week of communication 
products div., which also absorbs TV transmitter div. 
(transmitters & studio equipment). Herbert E. Taylor 
J r., mgr. of former transmitter div., heads new division. 







with Elbctronks Rbports 



WASHINGTON 5. D C • TEIEPHONE STERLING 3-1755 



Trade Beport 
January 16, 1954 



THIS WAS RETAILERS' WEEK IN TV TRADE: Anxious dealers asked how to sell color this 
week at 2 big conventions — and got this as answer: sell black-&-white . At NARDA's 
parley in Chicago and at National Retail Dry Goods Assn, convention in New York, big 
question was how to merchandise color in 1954. Although answers weren't as specific 
as many retailers would have liked, essence was; play up the virtues of black-&-white 
and low prices and, above all, stress compatibility of sets. 

Compatibility will be rallying point for sales messages next few months — 
tell folks they won't miss this year's relatively few color programs and that black- 
&-white sets won't be obsoleted. Wrong way to handle color is to play it down, they 
were told. That way, neither black-&-white nor color will be sold. 

Speakers were necessarily wary of specifics, what with advances currently 
toward larger color tubes and better colorcasting equipment. In message to NRDGA, 
J.B. Elliott . RCA Victor exec. v.p. for consumer products, bore down on theme that 
color will supplement black-&-white , not oppose it. He stressed that at S800-S1000 . 
color was strictly big-ticket merchandise , didn't belong in same league with under- 
^200 black-&-white. He predicted steady growth of color production until by 1958 
more than 10,000,000 sets will be in use. (For Elliott's other remarks, see p. 11.) 

NARDA got the same pitch , only more so. In absence of much specific data 
on when and in what quantity color sets will be available, dealers were told (1) to 
learn as much as possible about color fundamentals and (2) to attend the servicing 
clinics offered by set makers and to be prepared for much more complex problems. 

NARDA color panels hit hard at both angles , with side excursion into program 
plans of networks (see p. 6). W.T. Wintringham . engineer in charge of research for 
Bell Labs, led off with painstaking description of what goes into a color picture. 
Speaking like a high school coach lecturing fundamentals, Wintringham explained with 
commendable simplicity how color picture is composed of brightness, hue, saturation. 

Hazeltine chief engineer W.O. Swinyard carried ball from there. He went into 
equally basic analysis of circuitry in color set and some of the problems of mass 
production. He estimated that within 5-10 years list price of color set will be 
only 25-50% higher than comparable black-&-white. As to output, he estimated 1955 
production will double 1954' s estimated 50-200,000, and 1956 will double 1955. 

DuMont service mgr. H.J. Schulman said color sets will require 6-10 service 
calls a year , double those of black-&-white , because of more components, new parts, 
repetition of operating instructions to consumers, inexperienced servicemen and an- 
ticipated difficulties in color transmission. 

Tell consumer color will require lots of service , he warned dealers, and all 
color sets sold this year at least should have one-year service contract. He didn't 
estimate cost of service contract but RCA Service Co . previously had stated service 
contract would cost minimum of $180 vs. $60 for black-&-white (Vol. 9:52). He said 
too that color set requires 30-60 minutes to set up properly and warned that built- 
in antennas may not work too well on color. 

Indicative of intensity of interest color has generated , it seemed to us the 
dealers hung on every word, plying speakers with requests for elaborations. After 
color session, which closed convention, several told us they planned to attend set 
makers' service clinics, or send servicemen. NARDA committee itself proposed to 
speed up distribution of literature on problems of color service. 

♦ ♦ 

Dealers were split in appraising current TV market . Retailers in older areas 
told us they were none too happy about Xmas business and didn't look forward to much 
improvement in first quarter. Dealers in newer markets were more optimistic, but 

- 9 - 



10 - 



u'Bren't shouting from rooftops, either. They regarded Xmas business as good, for 
most part, some noting that they had no previous Xmas with which to compare it. 

Dealer reaction to recent price cuts by set makers was generally unfavorable , 
accompanied as it was in most cases by lower markups. Astute Harry Price , NARDA's 
v.p. , of Price's Inc., Norfolk, commented: 

" Manufacturers' list prices have come to be a joke in many markets. The set 
makers don't make prices. For that matter, neither do dealers. Consumers do. It's 
like this; A customer comes into the store, looks at a set and says 'I don't want 
to buy a TV set for $180. If you cut it to $140 I may buy it. If you don't. I'll 
go across the street to another dealer. ' So you either cut the price and knock out 
your small markup, or let her go." 

* * * * 

Bearing out statements of production cutbacks , TV output got off to limping 
start in RETM's first statistical wee k of 1954, totaling 106,525 week ended Jan. 8 
vs. 155,892 first week of 1953. Radios totaled 225,481, up from 209,057 year ago. 



O PERATING techniques of some 400 TV-radio-appli- 
ance dealers were described this week by one of their 
leaders — chairman Moi’t Farr, reporting to NARDA con- 
vention in Chicago on results of survey he conducted. He 
summarized findings as follows: 

54*/o reported they are open one night a week, 18% 
two nights, 8% three nights, 2% four nights, 12% five 
nights, 6% six nights; 90% sell sets on their own floors; 
22% have 2 salesmen, 12% have three, 32% have four, 
16% have five, 10% more than ten; 50% pay salary & 
commission, 12% pay salary only, 36% straight commis- 
sion; 50% have saleswomen on their floors, but in two- 
thirds of the cases this proved unsuccessful. 

Farr singled out night closing as most serious defi- 
ciency. His advice: stay open more evenings, even if it 
means closing in the morning. As a successful dealer in 
Upper Darby, Pa., Farr said he’d lose 20% of his volume 
by closing evenings. Though color was feature of NARDA 
convention (see p. 9), these were among other highlights: 
Service firm representatives urged establishment of 
2-unit service div., one unit for TV-radio, the other for 
appliances. NARDA now has single service committee. 
Proposal must be submitted to NARDA board for approval. 
Service committee also suggested establishment of national 
schedule of service charges to avoid regional differences in 
prices charged consumers. 

NARDA treas. Ken Stucky, Stucky Bros., Ft. Wayne, 
urged standardized system of accounting be adopted 
throughout appliance industry. He pointed to accomplish- 
ment of automobile industry in this regard and drew 
parallel between needs of auto dealers in 1915 and ap- 
pliance dealers today. He said small-volume dealers should 
allow 20% of operating costs to cover salesmen; 20% for 
necessary staff’ to support salesmen; 20% for advertising, 
deliveries & administrative expense; 20% for occupancy, 
insurance, bad debts, etc.; 20% for taxes, interest and re- 
investments. Large-volume dealers must make additional 
allowance for freight, lost goods, etc., consequently figure 
16%% for each of the items. 

E. C. Rankin, gen. mgr.. National Appliance Trade-In 
Guide Co., Madison, Wis., also drew parallel with auto- 
mobile industry in urging greater use of NARDA Blue 
Book for TV trade-ins in move to offset price-cutting. He 
said: “First the automobile industry was confronted with 
the problem [of price-cutting] and they did something 
about it. They devised new merchandising methods at the 
retail level, to make the trade-in sale less painful to every- 
one concerned. Among other things, they devised the Blue 
Book, which has gained an almost universal acceptance 
among customers and dealers alike; it has standardized 
trade-in values on cars to such an extent that the majority 
of dealers will all offer you the same for your old car.” 



NARDA director Emerson Dole, Appliance Center, 
Wichita, stressed importance of demonstrations, both in 
store and in home. “When we give the customer a demon- 
stration we sell the end use of the product, what it will 
actually do for the customer,” he said. “Demonstrations 
create prospects out in the field, often before they were 
ready to come into the store on their own. And when a 
customer’s interest is wakened that early, it’s much easier 
to close the sale without having price become a factor in 
the sale.” 

J. A. Broadhurst, Jenkins Music Co., Wichita, sharply 
attacked “deceitful” ads by TV-radio dealers, said manu- 
facturers and distributors should shut off co-op advertising 
support of ads which make any reference to specific dollar 
value of trade-ins, free goods, combination deals, or do 
not sell product featur-es. He said manufacturers have in 
some instances paid up to 100% of the cost of such 
ads. “Let’s get our business out of the Better Business 
Bureau files,” he concluded. 

■ 

Phonograph record boom will continue for next 5 
years, with annual sales of $300,000,000 by 1960, predicts 
Emanuel Sacks, v.p. & gen. mgr. of RCA Victor Records. 
He added that in 5 years impact of vastly increased teen- 
age population — as result of high birth rate during World 
War II — will bring huge new market for records. Sales 
this year will exceed $250,000,000, up about 12% from the 
$220,000,000 of 1953, he estimated, adding RCA showed 
20% boost in record sales last year over 1952. He cited 
widespread acceptance of multi-speed turntables and popu- 
larity of 45rpm records as main reasons for cm-rent boom. 

Canadian TV market in 1954 looks good to Vincent 
Barreca, pres., Canadian Admiral Corp. Speaking to some 
800 dealers in Toronto, he estimated more than 500,000 
sets, valued at $200,000,000, would be sold in Canada this 
year, up 40% from the estimated 360,000 sold in 1953. He. 
also foresaw sales of 350,000 new refrigerators, including 
50,000 replacements — or about same number as in 1953. 
He said Admiral’s $1175 color set would cost about $1600 
in Canada — if available at all. He added Canadian Ad- 
miral engineers are now working on color set. 

Guaranteed annual wage is goal of CIO Electrical 
Workers union, pres. James Carey revealed in releasing 
basic demands to be made upon Westinghouse in negotia- 
tions slated to begin April 1. He said electrical manufac- 
turing companies are best able to guarantee yearly pay, 
added his union will make same demand on GE and smaller 
companies in the field. 

Western Electronic Show & Convention has been 
scheduled in Pan Pacific Auditorium, Los Angeles, Aug. 25- 
27. Business mgr. is Mai Mobley Jr., 344 N. LaBrea Ave. 



11 - 



Topics & Trends of TV Trade: TV dealers got loads 

of advice this week on how to run their business. In addi- 
tion to several panels and speeches at NARDA’s Chicago 
convention (see pp. 9 & 10), 43rd annual parley of Na- 
tional Retail Dry Goods Assn, in New York heard these 
“6 commandments” for improving sales from J. B. Elliott, 
RCA Victor exec. v.p. for consumer products: 

(1) Limit number of TV lines to between 2 and 4 
nationally-advertised brands. (2) Make prescribed num- 
ber of home calls daily to consumers with small-screen sets 
in effort to build trade-ins or replacements. (3) Conduct 
home demonstrations. (4) Follow up phone contacts with 
personal calls every day. (5) Emphasize quality, perform- 
ance and entertainment of TV, not merely price. (6) Make 
sure servicing is best obtainable, to keep customers satis- 
fied. 

Elliott said retailers of home entertainment instru- 
ments have “sound and solid reasons” for optimism, add- 
ing: “With high-fidelity holding out the promise of wide- 
spread consumer acceptance, with radio and phonograph 
proving perennially good business producers, with black-&- 
white TV sales continuing, and with color TV as a future 
potential, how can we lose?” For Elliott’s comments on 
color, see p. 9. 

* * * 

Picture tube sales in first 11 months of 1953 totaled 
9,341,427 valued at $228,671,345, compared to 5,937,647 
worth $130,709,088 in same 1952 period, reports RETMA. 
Rectangular 20-in. and larger represented 79% of sales. 
Nov. sales were 693,396 worth $16,794,812, compared to 
948,593 at $23,994,184 in Oct. and 876,712 at $21,472,381 
in Nov. 1952. 

Receiving tube sales in first 11 months totaled 413,- 
687,529 valued at $285,842,926, compared to 324,512,611 
worth $229,872,337 in same 1952 period. Of sales, 278,- 
986,843 went for new sets, 106,341,848 renewal, 18,870,213 
export, 9,488,625 Govt. For Nov., sales totaled 31,606,971 
worth $22,514,227, compared to 34,928,108 at $25,393,879 
in Oct. and 36,942,664 at $24,554,156 in Nov. 1952. 

♦ ♦ * * 

Stromberg-Carlson introduced 5 new 21-in. models at 
distributors conference in Chicago Jan. 11. All are sub- 
stantially lower in price than comparable models in current 
line, leader being plextone finish table at $230, down from 
$280 on comparable model. Distributors were also shown 
new llVz-in. color receiver, which will be priced later. 
C. J. Hunt, TV-radio gen. mgr., said present plans were to 
build sample color sets during spring for loan to distribu- 
tors, Pres. Robert C. Tait said 1953 was biggest sales year 
in company history and predicted 1954 would be even bet- 
ter. New models: plextone table $230 & $260; open-face 
mahogany veneer console, $350 & $380; open-face bleached 
mahogany veneer console, $360 & $390; full-door mahogany 
veneer console, $485 & $515; full-door limed oak veneer 
console, $495 & $525. Also introduced was high fidelity 
portable phonograph at $100. 

Five-alarm fire which razed block-long warehouse used 
by CBS-Columbia on Erie Basin waterfront in Brooklyn 
injured 18 fireman and 3 policemen Jan. 15 and destroyed 
3800-4000 black-&-white TV sets and some 8000 cabinets. 
CBS-Columbia pres David H. Cogan estimated loss would 
set production schedule back 12 weeks. 

Columbia Records Inc., CBS subsidiary, announces 
$1,000,000 expansion program, including new record- 
making factory in Terre Haute, Ind. that will use injection 
molding presses and installation of similar presses in 
Bridgeport & Hollywood plants. 

Hallicrafters has int7oduced 21-in. mahogany table at 
$200, plus 4 table radios from $40-130. Two of radios are 
short wave-equipped. 



Distributor Notes: RCA Victor appoints new Fidelity 
Electric Co., Seattle, replacing Harper Meggee Inc.; exec, 
v.p. is J. E. Gollihur, who held same title at Harper Meggee 
. . . Philco appoints new Chemung Appliance Distributing 
Co., 103 E. Woodlawn Ave., Elmu-a, N. Y., headed by John 
Wolfe Sr., ex-Gross Distributors, N. Y. (Stromberg-Carl- 
son); new outlet replaces Valley McCleod Co. . . . Halli- 
crafters appoints F. M. Brown Co., Portland, Me. (Henry 
Norrington, gen. mgr.), replacing Appliance Wholesalers 
Inc. . . . Arvin names Tarbell-Watters Co., 144 Chestnut 
St., Springfield, Mass. (John S. Leven, v.p. & gen. mgr.) 
. . . DuMont appoints Skofel Italiana, SRL, Via Fratelli 
Gabba, 1, Milan, Italy (Dr. Renzo Di Piramo, pres.) in ex- 
pansion of foreign distribution . . . Bi-State Distributing 
Corp., Omaha (Admiral) promotes R. J. Harrison from 
sales mgr. to gen. mgr., succeeding Lloyd W. Sleezer, re- 
signed . . . Gross Distributors Inc., N. Y. (Stromberg- 
Carlson) appoints John Manzi, ex-Olympic Radio, as dis- 
trict mgr. . . . Crosley-Bendix announces resignation of 
C. J. Ward as Portland, Ore. branch mgr.; he joins Times 
Appliance Co. Inc., 353 Foiu'th Ave., N. Y., retail store, as 
gen. sales mgr. . . . Davega Stores promotes Matthew M. 
Roth to sales mgr., succeeding Max L. Stein, retired . . . 
Emerson names G. W. Ryan Distributing Co., Kansas City. 

St. Louis Better Business Bureau, declaring TV set 
advertising is “anything but desirable,” issued following 
informal standards for guidance of local retailers: (1) 
Monthly or weekly payments should not be quoted without 
reference to down payment. (2) Descriptions of cabinets 
should be accurate, stating if they are wood or plastic. 
(3) Size of picture should be differentiated from size of 
tube. (4) Terms of warranty or guarantee should be ex- 
plained fully. (5) Ads should state if later model than set 
pictured is for sale and if advertised model has been dis- 
continued. (6) Uhf tuning should not be included if tuner 
is not built-in. (7) Pictures of sets should be closely 
juxtaposed to prices of each in ad. 

First 82-channel 21-in. table at $200 was introduced 
this week by Philco, which broke with lower-priced line 
few weeks ago (Vol. 10:1). Combination vhf-uhf set is 
Model 4001-E in ebony finish; as vhf-only, it sells for $180. 
Two other all-channel 21-in. tables were priced at $220 in 
mahogany, blonde $250. 

Admiral reduced prices by $20-30 on 4 plastic tables 
in current line, having introduced 5 lower-priced 21-in. 
models only last month (Vol. 10.1). Latest reductions: 
TA1811, 17-in. ebony $180 (down from $200) ; TA1812, 
17-in. mahogany $200 ($230); TA2211, 21-in. ebony $200 
($220); TA2212, 21-in. mahogany $220 ($250). 

Capehart Argentina S.I.A.C., newly formed to manu- 
facture TV-radio receivers, radio-phonograph combinations 
and CR picture tubes, was announced by IT&T Jan. 14; 
it’s half-owned by IT&T, capitalized at 20,000,000 Argen- 
tine pesos, will begin making 1500 TVs monthly by next 
April. 

Color can be relayed by its community antenna equip- 
ment, Jerroid Electronics Corp. reports after tests at 
\V MAR-TV, Baltimore. Pres. Milton Shapp says that 
equivalent of 5-mi. system was fed with color signal, pro- 
ducing excellent results, and that no trouble is anticipated 
with community system of any size. 

Sylvania disclosed color plans this week, joining other 
set makers (Vol. 9:51-10:2), announced it would place 
sample color sets in hands of distributors by March. 
They’re being produced at Buffalo plant and price will be 
about $1150, said gen. sales mgr. Bernard 0. Holsinger. 

Shaw Television Corp., Brooklyn, making own TV line, 
is now limiting its distribution to N. Y.-N. J. area, with 
Olympic handling national sales. 



12 - 



Electronics Reports: Development of silicon transistor, 
capable of operating at temperatures up to 700°, was an- 
nounced this week by Philco. “We believe this is the first 
time anyone has succeeded in producing a transistor using 
silicon as the semiconductor,” said research v.p. David B. 
Smith. He added that germanium transistors fail at 212°, 
but heat-resistant properties of silicon make it suitable for 
use in guided missiles, jet aircraft and other applications 
where much heat is generated. He emphasized that pro- 
duction of silicon transistors still is far off, depends on 
ability to isolate sufficient amounts of the extremely pure 
silicon required. Developmental silicon transistor is made 
by Philco’s new “surface-barrier” technique (Vol. 9:49). 

Closed-circuit TV will speed up racing during March- 
April season at Florida’s Gulfstream Park. Industrial 
TV camera and sound intercom will be installed in film 
patrol lab, with receivers in stewards’ stand. Says Gulf- 
stream pres. James Donn: “In the past [when a foul was 
claimed] it was necessary for our stewards to travel down- 
stairs to the administration building to interview the 
riders, after which they consulted the filmed running of 
the race. [With TV] these operations can now be com- 
pleted in a few minutes.” Jockey wishing to claim a foul 
now proceeds to small room under grandstand, stands be- 
fore TV camera and consults with stewards via 2-way 
inter-com. Films of race are then projected before TV 
camera, viewed in stand and an immediate decision made. 

TV camera used as “eye” of simple computer is heart 
of Sanguinometer, speedy and accurate device for count- 
ing human blood cells, developed by RCA engineers in 
cooperation with Sloan-Kettering Institute, research unit 
of Memorial Center for Cancer & Allied Diseases. Using 
vidicon closed-circuit industrial TV system and optical 
microscope, Sanguinometer employs computer which can 
count particles in a given field by means of circuit de- 
veloped by RCA Labs’ L. E. Flory and W. S. Pike. Equip- 
ment, developed to provide quick and simple mass method 
of taking blood counts of persons exposed to atomic at- 
tack, is said to perform almost instantaneously and with 
minimum of error a process that has long been laborious, 
time-consuming and often unprecise. Similar circuits can 
be adapted to count such other microscopic items as bac- 
terial cultures or gi’ains of photographic emulsion. 

Textron Inc., Providence, R. I. textile firm, has ac- 
quired all stock of Dalmo Victor Co., San Carlos, Cal., 
manufacturer of airborne radar antennas, which will be 
operated as wholly owned subsidiary with no management 
changes. Dalmo Victor sales totaled more than $24,000,000 
in fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1953, defense work account- 
ing for entire output. Acquisition by Textron will permit 
Dalmo Victor to expand into other related fields, said Tex- 
tron chairman Royal Little. 

Burroughs Corp., Detroit, has set up its electronics 
instruments div. as separate manufacturing-marketing div. 
in Philadelphia because, as pres. John S. Coleman states, 
its productions “have become such an important part of 
the company’s business.” Division produces pulse control 
units, scientific computers, vacuum tubes, etc. 

H. H. Robertson Co., Pittsburgh producer of building 
products, synthetic resins and commercial asphalts, enters 
electronics field with purchase of controlling stock of In- 
ternational Research & Development Corp., Columbus, 0. 
(electronics & research). 

International Resistance Co. has started new branch 
plant in Boone, N. C., with John S. Kane as mgr.; Sterling 
Graydon, chief engineer; James Winkler Jr., quality engi- 
neer; Tom Wright, product engineer. 

G. L. Ohlstrom Associates, N. Y., has acquired work- 
ing assets of Inet Inc., Los Angeles manufacturer of elec- 
tronic, mechanical & magnetic equipment. 



R CA’s RIGHT to grant or continue sublicenses under 
. certain GE & Westinghouse patents after Dec. 31, 
1954 was upheld by Federal Judge Albert B. Maris in 
Wilmington court Jan. 11 when he denied June 11 motion 
by GE asking “construction and enforcement” in line 
with the court’s 1932 consent decree involving patent li- 
censing relations (Vol. 9:24). In filing the motion, GE 
electronics v.p. Dr. W. R. G. Baker stated the proceed- 
ing was not a suit against RCA but simply a request for 
the court to declare that the decree provides “the sub- 
licensing rights of RCA expired in all respects on Dec. 
31, 1954.” 

Judge Maris ruled that both licensing and sublicensing 
rights survive the Dec. 31, 1954 termination date, assert- 
ing the consent decree’s language “clearly and unambigu- 
ously includes sublicensing rights within the scope of the 
licenses which RCA receives under Section 3 of Article 5 
of the agreement from GE and Westinghouse.” 

On another patent front. Zenith Radio and its tube- 
making subsidiary Rauland filed motion in Federal dis- 
trict court in Chicago Jan. 10 for an amended counterclaim 
in suit brought in 1948 against them by RCA, charging 
patent infringement. They demand $16,000,000 in triple 
damages under anti-trust act. Zenith claims losses of 
$4,450,000, as result of alleged illegal patent monopoly, 
coerced royalty demands under illegal and unenforceable 
patent claims, and attorney fees caused by various patent 
infringement claims brought by RCA. Zenith asks triple 
damages of $13,300,000, Rauland $2,700,000. 

Plaintiff in other patent infringement suits filed this 
week was Edwin H. Armstrong, who filed in U. S. district 
Court in Chicago against Motorola, Wells-Gardner, Radio 
Craftsmen & Sentinel, and in Federal district court in Los 
Angeles against Gilfillan Bros., Hoffman Radio & Packard- 
Bell. Prof. Armstrong’s counsel are the N. Y. law firms of 
Cravath, Swaine & Moore and Byerly, Townsend & Wat- 
son; Chicago firm of Davis, Lindsey, Hibben & Noyes; 
Los Angeles, Herbert A. Huebner. 



“Plus” audience provided by community systems is 
small but welcome addition to TV stations’ coverage. 
E. P. H. (Jimmy) James, ex-NBC & MBS v.p., now in 
Tucson for family’s health and serving as public relations 
director of KVOA-TV, reports that several systems are re- 
ceiving station consistently at distances up to 183 mi. 
Prescott (183 mi.) and Ajo (115 mi.) have been receiv- 
ing KVOA-TV and others for some time. System in Bisbee 
(85 mi.) has just started, with spur to Warren, planning 
microwave to serve Douglas. In Nogales (60 mi.), com- 
munity operator is now stringing cable, hopes to get going 
soon. James points out not only that many of these “plus” 
viewers trade in Tucson but that “it is clear that since 
the entertainment facilities of these remote places are 
very limited, TV becomes a very important part of their 
life.” 

Community antenna in Casper, Wyo., getting Denver 
signals via 5-hop $250,000 Philco microwave operated by 
phone company, began operations Jan. 8, signed up 300 
subscribers first day. System in Reno, Nev., receiving 
San Francisco signals through one-hop phone company 
microwave, started Jan. 10. 

Army’s electronic proving ground is being moved 
from Ft. Monmouth to Ft. Huachuca, Ariz. New com- 
mander, taking over early next month, will be Brig. Gen. 
Emil Lenzner, now chief of plans & operations div.. Office 
of Chief Signal Officer. 

J. Gilman Reid Jr., ex-director of electronics div.. Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, named head of ACF Elec- 
tronics Co., newly formed by American Car & Foundry 
Co., with headquarters in Alexandria, Va. 



J 



- 13 - 



Trade Personals: Frank Freimann, Magnavox pres., 

first manufacturer to win an “Oscar of Retailing,” annual 
silver plaque awarded by National Retail Dry Goods Assn., 
which for last 50 years has always gone to a retailer; he 
won it for “effort in the interests of good retailer-manufac- 
turer relationships, which has won for him admiration and 
good will of the nation’s retailers” . . . Dr. Allen B. Du- 
Mont awarded American Power Boat Assn.’s Herbert L. 
Stone national power cruiser championship trophy for pre- 
dicted log racing ... A. Brewer Hunt, Canadian RTMA 
pres, and gen. mgr. of communications equipment div. of 
Northern Electric Co., heads Canada’s $100,000,000 elec- 
tronics defense program, serving as $l-a-year man . . . Dr. 
Alfred N. Goldsmith, electronics engineering consultant, 
onetime RCA chief engineer, elected chairman of National 
Television Film Council . . . Wm. J. Helt resigns as gen. 
sales mgr. of Raytheon TV-radio div. to become pres, of 
Appliance Distributors Inc., Raytheon Indianapolis distrib- 
utor . . . George M. Hakim has resigned as director of adv. 
& sales promotion, Raytheon TV-radio div., Chicago . . . 
Murray Epstein resigns as Kaye-Halbert purchasing agent, 
his duties to be assumed by Paul Ewing and Roy Thomp- 
son . . . Joseph Davis, ex-Kaye-Halbert, named production 
v.p. of new Caltech Electronics Co., Culver City, Cal. (high 
fidelity equipment) . . . Albert F. Wild named sales mgr. 
in expansion of GE broadcast equipment staff, reporting to 
Frank Barnes, marketing mgr.; Charles J. Simon appointed 
mgr. of product planning, C. Wesley Michaels mgr. of mar- 
keting research & administration, M. Roy Duncan mgr. of 
product service, Roy D. Jordan mgr. of adv. & sales promo- 
tion . . . Alfred Y. Bentley, chief of DuMont TV receiver 
mfg. div., placed in charge of advanced planning . . . R. K. 
White resigns as adv. mgr., Crosley TV-radio-appliance 
div. . . . George Cohen, ex-asst. sales director, named Em- 
erson eastern sales mgr. . . . Tex Barrett resigns as Tele 
King Los Angeles regional sales mgr. to join Horn & Cox 
Inc., Raytheon Los Angeles distributor . . . M. J. McNich- 



Financial & Trade Notes: Emerson Radio reports rec- 
ord sales of $75,926,546 for its fiscal year ended Oct. 31, 
1953, some 31% over fiscal 1952’s sales of $57,644,200. Net 
income for period was $2,988,432 ($1.54 a share) vs. $2,262,- 
555 ($1.17) in 1052. In report to stockholders, pres. Benja- 
min Abrams said Emerson’s net worth reached all-time high 
of $19,718,053, compared to previous high of $17,697,215 in 
1952. He stated company’s govt, sales volume in 1953 was 
20% over 1952 with present undelivered backlog of defense 
contracts about $40,000,000. As for TV, he forecast black- 
&-white receivers will be predominant for a long time and 
predicted bulk of sales will be lower priced table models, 
now comprising more than 70% of Emerson’s production. 

General Instrument Co., currently reported negotiat- 
ing to absorb or merge with another electronics compo- 
nents manufacturer, but maintaining a discreet silence, 
this week reported sales for 9 months ended last Nov. had 
reached new high of $27,159,000, up 30% from the $20,- 
560,100 of same 1952 period. Net income after taxes was 
$871,600 ($1.41 per share on 617,973 shares) compared 
with $685,900 ($1.13 on 608,673); before taxes, it was 
$1,815,000 vs. $885,900. 

George B. Storcr is disclosed as purchaser of 5000 
shares of common stock of Storer Broadcasting Co., out of 
recent public offering of 200,000 shares (Vol. 9:45, 47). He 
did not personally sell any of his own common stock hold- 
ings, now in excess of 640,000 shares, when Mr. & Mrs. J. 
Harold Ryan disposed of 165,625 shares for the public 
offering. We inadvertently stated last week (Vol. 10:2) 
that Mr. Storcr had also sold 34,375; it was Detroit Trust 
Co., as trustee, which sold those shares. 



olas, Andrea special apparatus div. mgr., promoted to di- 
rector, electronic div. . . . Morgan Greenwood promoted to 
new post of Philco gen. adv. mgr., reporting to adv. v.p. 
John Gilligan . . . Joe Chapman Lane Jr, promoted to adv. 
mgr., Westinghouse tube div., Elmira, N. Y. . . . Henry 
Czech, Westinghouse regional mgr., elected pres., Chicago 
Electric Assn., succeeding John M. Price, Allen-Bradley 
. , . Joseph H. Quick, ex-RCA, Philco & Sylvania, recently 
partner in Work-Factor Co., management service, named 
pres.. National Co., succeeding Charles C. Hornbostel, re- 
signed . . . Sidney A. Schneider named Stewart-Warner 
Electric’s resident field engineer covering midwest . . . 
Joseph Schlig, asst, to sales mgr. of Westinghouse elec- 
tronic tube div., Elmira, chosen one of 15 to take 16-month 
management course at Harvard School of Business . . . 
R. K. Gilbert has resigned as chief of production. Standard 
Coil Products Chicago plants . . . Robt. Middleton, ex-RCA 
and Precision Apparatus, joins Simpson Electric Co., Chi- 
cago, to lecture to service technicians . . , E. B. Conley 
named v.p. & gen. mgr. of electronic equipment factory of 
Allied International Inc., So. Norwalk, Conn., due for com- 
pletion in Feb. . . . Frank X. Lamb, chief engineer, named 
v.p., and Roswell W. Gilbert, research director, named asst, 
to pres. Earl R. Mellen, Weston Electrical Instrument 
Corp. . . . Ralph E. Walker, Walker-Jamieson Inc., elected 
chairman of Chicago chapter. National Electronics Distrib- 
utors Assn.; Howard Larson, Atronic Corp., treas.; John 
G. Bowman, J. G. Bowman & Co., secy. . . . John K. Koepf, 
ex-RETMA, recently in Treasury savings bond div., ap- 
pointed special asst, to Lothair Teetor, asst. Secy, of Com- 
merce for Domestic Affairs . . . Rudolf Feldt, mgr. of 
instrument plant and ex-DuMont research engineer, named 
mgr. of newly created instrument div.. Federal Telecom- 
munication Labs . . . Robt. A. Seidel, RCA v.p., ap- 
pointed v.p. of parent company’s new sales & service sub- 
sidiaries div., headquartering in N. Y. and in charge of 
RCA Service Co., RCA Victor Distributing Co. and RCA 
Institutes. 



Unidentified purchaser reportedly is seeking up to 
115,000 shares of Weston Electrical Instrument Corp. stock 
(of the 428,221 shares outstanding) through First Invest- 
ment Co., Los Angeles, which has asked for tenders at $25 
a share. Stock closed Jan. 13 at 21%. Weston secy .-treas. 
F. G. Hawthorne said so far as he knew no officer or direc- 
tor of the company had been asked to tender shares. First 
Investment Co. officials said they are “acting for a com- 
pany whose stock is listed on the N. Y. Stock Exchange 
and with whom Weston officials have met.” 

a 

Vergal Bourland, Bourland Home Appliances, Ft. 
Worth, elected pres, of NARDA, succeeding Wallace John- 
ston, Wallace Johnston Appliances, Memphis. Vice-presi- 
dents: Harry B. Price, Price’s Inc., Norfolk (reelected); 
Carl Hagstrom, General Appliances, San Francisco; Don 
Gabbert, Gabbert’s, Minneapolis. Mort Farr, Upper Darby, 
Pa., was elected chairman and following dii-ectors were 
elected for 3-year terms: Harold Rice, Good Housekeeping 
Shop, Dayton; Steve Weinstein, Magee Distributors Inc., 
Boston; A1 Robertson, Westinghouse Appliance Stores, 
Oklahoma City. 

Named to new Communications Div. of Defense Dept. 
Office of Transportation & Communications: Col. Wm. 
Hamlin, ex-chief. Army Communications Service Div.; 
Capt. Clifford Grange, ex-administrative asst., security 
branch. Directorate of Naval Communications; Col. Ster- 
ling Briggs, ex-chief, program & standards branch. Plans 
& Policies Div., Air Force Directorate of Communications. 

Edward F. Callahan, 68, who retired in 1950 as v.p. of 
International GE after 45 years with the company, died 
Jan. 13 in Greenwich, Conn, after long illness. 



Telecasting Notes: How dependent many stations are 
on film progTamming is sharply highlighted in first annual 
TV Station Film Manual (44-p.) released by NARTB this 
week to TV members. Divided into 3 parts — programming 
hours & costs, case histories, station comments — manual 
reports that of some 60-odd stations responding to ques- 
tionnaire last summer, all reported that hours of local film 
programs exceeded local live shows. In Group 1 (stations 
with up to 50,000 TV families) average was 26.54 hours 
of film programs a week vs. 10.37 live, while in Group 5 
(stations with 1,000,000 or more TV families) ratio was 
42.20 film vs. 32.50 live . . . Cost of programming facilities 
to stations in all groups was reported as $126 per hour for 
live shows, $85 for film . . . Detailed case histories of film 
programming were reported for 6 stations (KGNC-TV, 
Amarillo; KKTV, Colorado Springs; KRON-TV, San Fran- 
cisco; WAAM, Baltimore; WBTV, Charlotte; WCAU-TV, 
Philadelphia)- — with reports on their film purchasing, pro- 
gramming hours and costs, personnel, film equipment, 
operational procedures, film ID specifications & engineer- 
ing, plus diagrammed floor plans and reproductions of 
forms used in scheduling, routing & filing of film . . . TV 
film is mighty important to Hollywood, too — Jan. 13 
Variety predicting production will amount to record $40,- 
000,000 this year, with fewer companies producing more 
filins; it points out that telefilm pattern is beginning to 
follow that of motion pictures, as a few large companies 
take over smaller outfits and get into mass production of 
films . . . Recent Politz study. Importance of Radio in TV 
Areas Today, available free from NARTB, which has 
mailed it to AM & FM members, all Congressmen, com- 
missioners and staff of FCC and to civic, educational & 
religious leaders, etc. . . . Another film index: Directory of 
Non-Royalty Films for TV, compiled by WOI-TV, Ames, 
and published this week by Iowa State College Press; it 
gives alphabetical listing of all available films, private & 
go\T., is available for $6 from publishers or bookstores 
. . . Cleveland’s WEWS is spending $50-60,000 buying 
space in 31 Ohio dailies and 4 in Pennsylvania, consisting 
of five 160-line ads per week for 3 weeks, then three 160- 
line ads for next 3 weeks, promoting its new higher tower 
& power; McCann-Erickson, Cleveland, places the space 
. . . Smart publicity: Zenith Radio to award statuettes to 
lady TV commentators who “achieve the most for public 
service programming in 1953”; judges: Fred Sammis, 
McFadden Publications; George Rosen, Variety; Frank 
Burke, Radio Daily . . . KCOP, Los Angeles (formerly 
KLAC-TV) , as one of first steps under new Copley Press 
ownership, has reduced base Class A hour rate from $1250 
to $900, half hour from $750 to $540; Class B, $800 to $600 
& $480 to $360; Class C, $600 to $500 & $360 to $300 . . . 
VVTOP-TV, Washington, adding 73 ft. to its 300-ft. tower, 
increases RCA batwings from 6 to 12, says it will double 
ERP . . . Big WOR-TV studios on 67th St., New York, 
leased for 3 years to NBC-TV is now being prepared for 
new daytime Home show . . . WOAI-TV, San Antonio, now 
starts program day at 7 a.m. with NBC-TV’s Today. 

B 

Seeking clarification of multiple ownership proposal 
(Vol. 9:52), Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. asked FCC 
to confirm its understanding that minority station stock- 
holdings of directors of parent Westinghouse Electric Co. 
won’t be counted in total of stations permitted a single 
entity. It reported these holdings: (1) Director John Hall 
is a director and v.p. of Herald Traveler Corp. which is 
licensee of WHDH, Boston, through subsidiary. (2) Di- 
rector John Schiff owns 15% of Transcontinental Prop- 
erties Inc., which, through subsidiaries, operates TV sta- 
tions WFTV, Duluth; KETV, Little Rock; KCTV, Sioux 
City; WICS, Springfield, 111. and AM station WCVS, 
Springfield. (3) Director Dillon Anderson owns 8% of 
applicant Houston Area TV Co. 



Publisher J. R. Knowland, Oakland Tribune (KLX), 
father of the U. S. Senator from California and GOP floor 
leader, this week purchased 5% interest in application of 
Channel Two Inc., seeking Ch. 2 allocated San Francisco 
bay area, for which 3 others will also compete at hear- 
ings yet to be set. Knowland interests dropped own ap- 
plication last Nov. Simultaneously, Channel Two Inc. 
pres. Stoddard P. Johnston, stepson of John A. Kennedy, 
who sold San Diego’s KFMB-TV & KFMB last year for 
$3,150,000 (Vol. 9:5,9,13), announced that Howard L. 
Chernoff, recently resigned mgr. of the San Diego sta- 
tions, has been retained as executive director; he will also 
hold about 5% of stock. Johnston will hold 35% of stock 
and Kinco Enterprises, owned by his mother, will hold 
10%. Other stockholders are area business men. Robert 
Purcell, ex-operations mgr., KTTV, Hollywood, has been 
retained as consultant and Stanley Sievers as chief engi- 
neer. Contract has been signed with RCA for $650,000 
worth of equipment, including color apparatus. The other 
competitors for Ch. 2: KROW Inc., Oakland (Sheldon 
F. Sackett) ; General Teleradio Inc. (KFRC, San Fran- 
cisco) ; Television California (Edwin W. Pauley & C. L. 
McCarthy) . 

Sen. Ed Johnson’s bill to restrict telecasting and 
broadcasting of pro baseball games (S. 1396) was blocked 
in Senate third time Jan. 11 when attempt to get it passed 
by unanimous consent drew objection from Sen. Smathers 
(D-Fla.). Bitterly opposed by NARTB, measure would 
specifically permit major league teams to bar TV-radio 
from games within 50 mi. of their home cities (Vol. 9:12, 
19,22,24-25,28). Also passed over because of objections 
were 3 bills requested by FCC and already passed by 
House (Vol. 9:16): (1) To give FCC 30 days instead of 
15 to act on protests (H. R. 4558), blocked by Smathers. 

(2) Easing penalties for some violations of Communica- 
tions Act. (HR. 4559), blocked by Sen. Gore (D-Tenn.). 

(3) Discontinuing requirement for CP for go\i;., amateur 
and mobile stations (H. R. 4557), blocked by Sen. Danger 
(R-N. D.). 

Educators were offered use of WOR-TV’s 810-ft. tower 
in North Bergen, N. J., built at cost of $250,000 and un- 
used since station moved transmitter to Empire State 
Bldg. General Teleradio v.p. Gordon Gray said tower has 
been offered to state educational depts. of both N. Y. & 
N. J. for joint use. In obvious rebuttal to North Bergen 
officials who have threatened legal action to tear down 
tower (Vol. 9:52), Gray said: “The concentration of TV 
transmission facilities in the Empire State Bldg, by all 
stations serving metropolitan New York makes it im- 
practical to destroy the only available emergency facili- 
ties.” He added de-icing equipment would be installed to 
eliminate icicle hazard which has brought complaints from 
some local residents. 

FCC abolished filing of annual ownership reports by 
TV & radio stations. In order this week (FCC 54-52), it 
ruled that hereafter stations will file same information at 
time of making applications for renewal of licenses (every 
3 years). Ruling is effective immediately and provides 
that ownership form must be filed with renewal applica- 
tions beginning Feb. 1. 

United Artists will shortly announce sale of its pio- 
neering TV film sei’vice to Joseph Harris and son Janies, 
who will finance, produce and distribute films for TV ; 
they’re among founders of Motion Pictures for Television 
Inc., and in gioup recently acquiring KXLY-TV, Spokane 
(Vol. 10:2). 

Power increases: WJBK-TV, Detroit (Ch. 2) Jan. 11 
began telecasting from new 1067-ft. antenna with 100-kw 
power. WSLS-TV, Roanoke (Ch. 10) Jan. 10 boosted power 
to 296 kw. WSTV-TV, Steubenville, 0. (Ch. 9) Jan. 9 
went to 230 kw. 





• laEPHONE STEBUNB 3-1755 • 

JAN 2 5 la^nuary 23, 



VOL. 10: 

1954 



No. 



4 



in this 
issue: 



' A Week's Experience with Color Set, page 1 

3 Grcnteci, 5 Dropped; Court Favors Zenith, page 2 
-< Transmitter Power and UHF Coverage, page 3 
Senate Committee Approves Comr. Lee, page 6 
Congress May Debate Multiple Ownership, page 6 



Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 7 
Plane-Tower Crashes Spur CAA Action, page 8 
1953 TV Output Worth About $2,375 Billion, page 10 
RCA's Plans for Larger Color TV Tubes, page 11 
Electronics in Mew Eisenhower Budget, page 13 



A WEEK'S EXPERIENCE WITH COLOR SET: Operating a color TV set under home conditions 

for a week now, we have a lot of reactions to report — ■ from ourselves and from lay- 
men who had never seen a color picture. These observations may help you anticipate 
problems and questions rising as sets become available and colorcasting increases. 

In weighing our observations , it should be borne in mind that they're based 
on one week's viewing (though we've seen scores of industry demonstrations) and that 
receiver employed is a pre-production model which doesn't necessarily perform pre- 
cisely the way production models will. 

Here's the setup : Receiver is RCA model with newest type of tri-color tube 
— 15-in round glass, giving ll)i-by-8%-in. picture with round sides. It's a console 
39-in. high, 27)^-in. wide, 29-in. deep. It has 36 receiving tube s, 2 selenium rec- 
tifiers. Standing beside it for comparison is 20-in. black-&-white Philco Model 
51-T2133 which is 39-in. high, 25-in. wide, 25)4-in. deep. 

Se parate antennas feed the sets . This is because WMAR-TV, Baltimore (about 
30 mi. away) has occasional colorcast and needs antenna directed toward it for best 
reception. Color antenna, a dipole with reflector, is aimed at Baltimore. WNBW, 
Washington, though picked up on rear of this antenna, has plenty of signal. 

* * * * 

First colorcast observed was the Dinah Shore program Jan. 19. Producer Alan 
Handley chose to open it with minimum of color, add more as program progressed, thus 
experimenting with pastels . We thought it excellent ; some viewers said they would 
have preferred more striking colors. Color fidelity generally appeared quite accu- 
rate — except for some too-pink flesh tones. Transparency of a Chevrolet came 
through with faithful robin's egg blue. 

Second Dinah Shore colorcast Jan. 21 was designed as "a blaze of colors," as 
Handley put it. It was all of that — extremely vivid costumes, reproductions of 
famous paintings, jewelry, etc. Polling viewers, we found a definite preference 
for the splash of color. For their first viewing, at least, they want to be over- 
whelmed with great variety of hues, highly saturated. 

Third color program we saw was series of test slides from WMAR-TV, which came 
through quite well except that reds weren't sufficiently saturated. Chief engineer 
Carl Nopper confirmed that transmitted reds were down a bit for this test. There 
was some ignition interference at the time — disturbing both black-&-white and 
color sets to same degree. 

*)**>!! 

Black-&-white reception on color se t — so called "reverse compatibility" — 
was very good. Compared with black-&-white set, brightness is lower, though we've 
seen many monochrome sets with no greater brightness. Taken by itself, picture is 
completely acceptable. Re gistration i s good. Up to 5-6 times picture height, a 
slight misregistration can sometimes be seen. Beyond that distance, none can be de- 



COPYRIQHT ISB4 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



2 



tected. There *s excellent resolution and complete freedom from any such , disturb- 
ances as crawl, twinkle, etc. 

But it seems like usin^ a Cadillac to pull a plow to watch black-&-white on 
a color set — feasible but wasteful. 

Set is extremely easy to tune — scarcely anything to it. Once the few dials 
are set right, they're right not only for color but usually for monochrome. If the 
dials are turned to wrong positions, accidentally or otherwise, a slight twist puts 
them where they belong. Furthermore, there's considerable latitude in tuning that 
will still produce satisfactory picture. Even skin tones can be varied and still 
look right at several different settings. 

Dials are as follows ; Large 2-control dial at left is for on-off-volume and 
brightness. At right are channel switch and fine tuning. Behind plate in center 
are small dials for contrast, hue, saturation and audio tone. In recess at side of 
set are 2 controls, for focus and convergence. Most can actually be ignored. 

Whether set will get more ticklish as it gets older is hard to say. But RCA 
Service Co. technicians report very little trouble with receivers after they're in- 
stalled. Furthermore, they're quite rugged in handling . James Cravens, supervisor 
of field color engineering, has followed sets all over country — when they were 
air-expressed to Pasadena, etc. — finding them in good shape on arrival. 

One reaction of laymen , somewhat amusing but quite real, is that they assume 
color set will reproduce all programs in color, right now. And there's a definite 
desire for larger screen , particularly when picture can be compared simultaneously 
with larger black-&-white picture beside it. 

One of our reactions , a very natural one, is that we get impatient waiting 
for the next scheduled color program. A color set without color programs is a most 
frustrating device indeed. 

But schedule of color programs is picking up . Following is NBC-TV color 
schedule through Feb., all originating in New York: 

Zoo Parade Jan. 31, 4:30-5; Howdy Doody Feb. 1-5 (every day), 5:30-6; Judge 
for Yourself (Fred Allen) Feb. 9, 10-10:30; Meet the Press Feb. 14, 6-6:30; Your Hit 
Parade Feb. 20, 10:30-11; Armstrong Theatre Feb. 23, 9:30-10; Excursion Feb. 28, 
4-4:30. No regular color test signals are scheduled as yet. 

CBS-TV has weekly New Revue 5:30-6 Fridays , carried only in New York & Balti- 
more. It will add weekly program Tuesdays in March, feed both to more cities. 

3 GRANTED, 5 DROPPED; COURT FAVORS ZENITH: Considerable action in grants this week , 
with 3 issued and 5 turned back, while FCC batted .500 in courts in 2 cases, but the 
recent bad weather prevented any station from getting on air — unless WNEM-TV, Bay 
City, Mich. (Ch. 5) manages to get antenna up and operating by Sun. Jan. 24. There 
was also an owner-employe blowup at WTVP , Decatur, 111. (Ch. 17) this week, followed 
by firings and/or quittings, and station went off air briefly. 

The CPs : Hot Springs, Ark ., Southern Newspapers, Ch. 9; Sioux City, la . , 

KCOM, Ch. 4; Durham, N.C ., WTIK, Ch. 11. Initial decisions favored : Radio Diablo . 
Stockton, Cal., Ch. 13; WDEF , Chattanooga, Tenn. , Ch. 12. 

The 5 CPs surrendered were most for any week to date : WMRI-TV , Marion, Ind. 
(Ch. 29); WCOW-TV , St. Paul (Ch. 17); KMON-TV , Great Falls, Mont. (Ch. 3); WPAQ-TV , 
Mt. Airy, N.C. (Ch. 55); WCHV-TV , Charlottesville, Va. (Ch. 64). All gave up be- 
cause they foresaw insufficient economic support. 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

FCC won handily in Court of Appeals when court rejected efforts of WCAN-TV, 
Milwaukee, to enjoin allocation of Ch. 6 to suburban Whitefish Bay pending court 
hearing on station's contention that allocation shouldn't be made. Thus, competi- 
tive hearing for Ch. 6 can go ahead , though WCAN-TV isn't precluded from later ask- 
ing court to stop winner of hearing from going on air before court decides case. 

But FCC got sharpest reversal ye t on any litigation growing out of end-of- 
freeze decision, when court ruled that Commission must give Zenith comparative hear- 






- 3 - 



ing with CBS to determine which can operate on Ch. 2 in Chicago . Court rejected 
FCC argument that Zenith had waived right to such hearing by not participating in 
rule-making on city's allocations. CBS now operates WBBM-TV on Ch. 2 , having pur- 
chased WBKB from United Paramount Theatres for $6,000,000, then changing call let- 
ters from WBKB and shifting from Ch. 4 under FCC order. 

Among other actions , FCC scheduled Feb. 19 for start of hearings for Ch. 7 
in Miami , Ch. 2 in Charleston, S.C . , Ch. 5 in Raleigh , Ch. 13 in Huntington . Com- 
mission also finalized the allocation of Ch. 10 to Farma-Onondaga, Mich . , making it 
available for Jackson, where CP for WIBM-TV (Ch. 48) was recently cancelled. 

FCC is now so up-to-date in its TV processing that all currently contested 
applicants will have received McFarland Letters by Feb. 1. 

In the fight at WTVP , Decatur, key employes and pres. W. L. Shellabarger , 
operator of grain milling business, got into argument Jan. 20. The 3 top staff mem- 
bers quit or were fired, whereupon many others walked off and station went off air . 
It got back on next day with help of engineers loaned by stations in nearby cities. 

According to owner Shellabarger , station was mismanaged, overstaffed, and 
losing money at rate up to $25,000 monthly. He said that top staff objected to his 
efforts to take active role in management. " They told me to go to Florida for 6 
months," he said. "They also told me they had a buyer — for 250 on the dollar." 

He said station had about 50 employes , compared with 15-20 for similar nearby 
stations, and that employes refused to double up as at other stations. After resig- 
nation of mgr. Harold Cowgill, program director Paul Taff and chief engineer James 
Wulliman, Shellabarger said, about two-fifths of the other employes walked off. He 
added that he's prepared to stand another year or so of losses if "by doing so I 
can protect my half-million dollar investment." 

Other side of story comes from Cowgill , former Washington radio lawyer who 
still holds 5% of stock. He said disagreement was over programming policy — that 
staff believed in long schedule with considerable live programming, in anticipation 
of stiff competition from nearby stations. WTVP has been running 10 hours daily, 
getting some programs from ABC, CBS & DuMont. 

Station was in black by Dec .. Cowgill said, though it had started in August. 
It employed 42, he said, and 30 quit after he, Taff and Wulliman were fired. 

TRANSMITTER POWER AND UHF COVERAGE: Maximum-power uhf transmitters are on the wav 
— from all major manufacturers. And the long-awaited RCA 12.5-kw uhf transmitter 
was annoiinced this week, deliveries to begin in latter May or early June. 

Telecasting plants which can radiate FCC's maximum 1-megawatt (1000-kw) power 
are still 1-2 years from production stage, and many stations are already adequately 
served by lower powers. There's still tendency to forget transmitter power isn't 
everything in uhf — any more than it is in vhf.‘ 

There are plenty of "substitutes" for top power — measures that can be taken 
and are being taken right now to achieve same results, and at lower cost. Perhaps 
the most important of these is improvement at TV receiver end : stations which have 
conducted technical education campaigns are increasing quality and range of their 
service by insuring good receiver installations. 

At transmitter end , higher towers often achieve results which can't be ob- 
tained through brute power; directionalized antennas can concentrate signal toward 
heavily populated areas. And without discoursing on economics, let us again point 
out most important factor in uhf success is the amount of high quality programming 
which doesn't duplicate any other TV service to the community. 

♦ ♦ *1 *1 

Tubes for top-powered uhf stations — rated at 50-75 kw and capable of deliv- 
ering 1 megawatt from high-gain antenna — are under development by RCA , by Varian 
A ssociates , Palo Alto, Cal., by Eitel-McCullough Inc . (Eimac), San Bruno, Cal. and 
probably by others. Varian and Eimac are working on higher-powered versions of the 
klystrons they now make for uhf, and hope to have samples some time this year. 

RCA is aiming for commercial 50-75 kw transmitters by 1956. Says a high RCA 



4 



source: "Our tube dept, has 2 separate engineering groups assigned to the develop- 
ment of a tube for this power. One group has been working with a high-power uhf 
tube of essentially standard design; the other is working with a tube of less con- 
ventional type. Both groups have had considerable success , and successful tubes of 
both types have been built. We are presently evaluating the comparative advantages 
of the 2 types and will shortly make a decision on which we will use." 

As for Eimac — "With a little luck we should have a sample 50-kw klystron by 
midyear," pres. W.W. Eitel tells us. "There are no formidable hurdles now," he adds 

— "it just requires a little doing." 

Eitel sees little problem of building transmitter around tube. "The appli- 
cation will be no different from current [klystron-powered] models. It's mainly a 
matter of building a big enough power supply ." Tube will require "much less than 
1 kw to drive it," might conceivably be driven by same unit v;hich now drives 12-kw 
transmitters. As to tubes of more than 50-kw power, "there should be no insurmount- 
able problems — but we'll wait and see what the industry wants." 

Varian's tube will be rated somewhere in 60-75 kw range, and prototype model 
"probably isn't a year off," says pres. Russell Varian , pioneer in klystrons. "But 
we can't tell what problems we'll run into in the laboratory." He, too, agrees that 
there'll be no particular problems in building transmitter around new tube — "it 
just needs bigger equipment." High-powered klystron, he says, will cost more than 
12-kw tube, "but not enormously more." 

After sample tubes are available it may well take transmitter makers 6 months 
to a year or more to begin production of the powerful new transmitters, on basis of 
past practices. Most transmitter makers themselves say the lihf "big Berthas" are at 
least a year away, probably more. 

What about costs ? None of the major transmitter makers would be pinned down 
on the bill for a complete 1-megawatt power plant. RCA offers "guess" that it will 
be "on the order of $250,000 " ; a GE official says "maybe 50-100% more than our 12-kw" 

— or in $200 , 000-$275 , 000 range. Another manufacturer estimates it may be $400,000 . 
Power to run 50-75 kw transmitter won't be important expense, probably will be about 
double that needed for 12-kw, or in neighborhood of $10 an hour. 

There will be no intermediate steps between 12-kw transmitters and 50-75 kw 
ones, manufacturers agree — next stop is maximum power. 

* * *' * 

Week's big transmitter news is RCA's 12.5-kw uhf plant which replaces its 
proposed 10-kw unit, ordered by many stations now using interim 1-kw transmitters. 

To date, only GE, using Varian-developed klystron, is delivering 12-kw vinit ; driven 
by 100-watt driver, it's priced at $133,000 less klystrons, which are rented. 

RCA transmitter is powered by new tetrode tube Type 6448, will be priced at 
about $150,000 , including crystals, tubes and f ilterplexer , or about $100,000 for 
amplifier only. It will be driven by RCA 1-kw transmitter , which company says will 
"allow for best possible transmitter adjustment for color." 

New transmitter's power rating is 12.5 kw at low end of band, decreasing 
gradually to 10.25 kw at Ch. 83 , measured at output of filterplexer "when all the 
adjustments have been made for wide frequency response and low phase shift required 
for color TV transmission." Since 10% has been allowed for loss in filterplexer, 

RCA engineers say usable output actually may be "close to 14 kw" on some channels. 

Two other manufacturers are coming out soon with 12-kw units, both using the 
Eimac klystron — DuMont . which now offers klystron-powered 5-kw, and Federal , which 
has scheduled first 12-kw for April delivery (Vol. 10:3). 

With prospect of competition in 12-kw field and slowdown in all uhf orders, 

GE can be expected to offer attractive price deal on its transmitters to telecasters 
using lower-powered units of other makes — as well as incentive of quick delivery. 

4c 9)e :t:l 

Vihen top-powered uhf transmitters are available , their use probably will be 
confined to big metropolitan areas, for some time at least. While highest power is 
one solution to some uhf coverage problems, there are other more immediately feas- 
ible ways to achieve similar results, industry's leading engineers point out. 



i 



5 



Propagation is far better in low uhf channels than in higher ones. Channel 
83 (884-890 me) is nearly twice as high in the spectrum as Ch. 14 (470-476), which 
is only a little more than twice as high as vhf Ch. 13 (210-216). Naturally, it is 
advisable to get as low a channel as possible, to start with. At request of one lihf 
station — WHIZ-TV, Zanesville, 0. (Ch. 50 ) — FCC has proposed to assign Ch. 18 to 
Zanesville, and presumably station plans to apply for new channel (Vol. 9:50). 

But the average uhf station on air must stick to its channel, high or low. 

And instead of dreaming of the 1-megawatt pie in the sky, which few will be able to 
afford, there are several ways they can "effectively increase their power." 

One such solution , applicable only in certain cases, is the directionalized 
transmitting antenna . Using 12-kw GE transmitter and tailor-made GE antenna, a few 
uhf stations now are sending out the equivalent of about 500 kw in direction of the 
heavily populated parts of their coverage areas. 

Another solution is the high tower . Particularly in hilly terrain, tower 
height is as important as power , or even more important in obliterating shadow areas 
and nulls. This is a step that can be taken right now by many stations, without 
waiting for 1000-kw power plants — and which can measurably increase coverage. 

But the area in which greatest increase in coverage can be realized doesn't 
involve transmitters, towers or transmitting antennas. It's the receiving end . 

The top engineer of one large transmitter-receiver manufacturer lists these 
3 steps to increase coverage of uhf stations — in order of their importance: 

(1) Good receiver installation practices. (2) More sensitive uhf tuners and 
receivers. (3) Increase in transmitter power . 

In uhf 's early days , receiver installations were incredibly sloppy. Service- 
men hadn't yet learned that what will pass in vhf is intolerable in uhf. Even today 
the really good uhf installation is the exception to the rule, although big strides 
have been made in training servicemen during uhf's first year. 

A poor installation which is improved so as to deliver twice as much signal 

to the TV set is equivalent to a fourfold boost in transmitter power. And there's 

still so much room for improvement in installation techniques that it's certain that 
a station's time and money used to educate servicemen and even supervise sample in- 
stallations would be well spent. 

Question of receiver sensitivity is all-important, by same token, but there's 
little the station operator can do about this. Set manufacturers are gradually but 
steadily improving tuners — but today's, by and large, are still pretty "noisy" as 
compared to vhf tuners. 

The goal is to develop ideal tubes and circuits for uhf tuning — items which 
aren't yet available at marketable prices. A good vhf tuner develops average of 
about 7 db of internal "noise" which must be overcome by incoming TV signal. Good 
modern uhf tuners have noise factors as low as 16-18 db , far cry from the 30-db 
level of early ones. In the laboratory, manufacturers have reduced noise figure to 
as little as 10 db, and by 1955, production tuners may develop only about 12 db. 

As more sensitive receivers are introduced , vhf history will repeat itself, 

and "fringes" will be pushed farther out. As with improved installation techniques, 
any improvement in receiver sensitivity is equivalent to its own square in trans- 
mitter power. For example, making a receiver 3 times as sensitive would give same 
results as ninefold power boost. 



Dropping TV-radio program logs, Nashville’s two 
newspapers, jointly-owned Nashville Tennessean and Nash- 
ville Banner announced in front-page statement in Jan. 16 
Nashville Tennessean that “broadcasters [who] use the 
air on exclusive licensed channels [should] share the cost 
of publication of the schedule of their commercial pro- 
gram.” Chico (Cal.) Enterprise-Record also recently dis- 
continued program listings, complaining they were no 
longer a public service because stations repeatedly failed to 
supply corrected logs, resulting in “loss of prestige and 
brunt of public ill feeling” borne by the newspaper. 



“TV City” for Chicago: CBS this week bought 75,000- 
sq. ft. Chicago Arena for $1,500,000, will spend another 
$1,500,000 to remodel it into “largest enclosed TV studio 
center outside Hollywood” after taking possession April 
1; on city’s near north side, building will house WBBM- 
TV studios, originations due to begin there in late fall. 

Exhaustive treatment of color, in scores of articles, 
comprises 566-page Proceedings of IRE for January. In- 
credible array of technical talent has written scores of 
papers on every conceivable phase of color — with some- 
thing for every engineer and technician in the business. 



6 



C ONFIRMATION of FCC Comr. Robert E. Lee is ex- 
pected Mon., Jan. 25 with no organized opposition, 
following his approval Jan. 19 by Senate Commerce Com- 
mittee. Though Democratic committee members ques- 
tioned him closely for more than 2 hours at Jan. 18 hear- 
ing — particularly on his associations with Sen. McCarthy 
and Texas oil millionaire H. L. Hunt — only dissenting 
vote was cast by Sen. Monroney (D-Okla.), who felt 
Lee’s qualifications weren’t sufficient for job. FCC ap- 
pointment, said Monroney, was “obviously a consolation 
prize, as Lee had been endorsed by House members for 
the job of Asst. Comptroller General.” 

Sen. McCarthy sat in audience for part of hearing 
while Lee stoutly denied he was “beholden” to the Wis- 
consin Senator. “I like him,” said Lee, “I think he’s a 
great guy,” but he was “very distressed” at implication 
friendship might influence him. The Senator had nothing 
to do with his appointment, he added. All Democratic 
committee members, except Magnuson (Wash.) who was 
absent, questioned him at length, but most critical ques- 
tioning came from Monroney, Pastore (R. I.) and Sraathers 
(Fia.). Lee said he had helped start Hunt’s Facts Forum 
filmed TV program and had moderated first 3 sessions 
for which he received $400 in expense money and returned 
SIOO. He said program was fair and unbiased; Monroney 
disagreed, calling it “rather heavily loaded on the side of 
the moderator.” Questioned by Pastore on Hunt’s Ch. 43 
grant in Corpus Christi, Lee replied he “had no idea Hunt 
was even an applicant till he came up on the agenda.” 



M ultiple ownership proposal by FCC, which 
would allow owners of 5 vhf stations to acquire 2 
uhf (Vol. 9:52), appears certain to get Congressional 
airing. Last week’s attack by Sen. Edwin Johnson (D- 
Colo.), ranking minority member of Senate Commerce 
Committee (Vol. 10:3), was seconded this week by commit- 
tee colleague Sen. Smathers (D-Fla.). In letter to Chair- 
man Bricker (R-0.), he urged committee to study proposed 
ruling to determine “whether or not it should be the na- 
tional policy to further allow this concentration of com- 
munications mediums in the hands of so few persons.” 
Smathers expressed view that present ownei-ship re- 
strictions should be “maintained or even strengthened” — 
at any rate they shouldn’t be changed “without thorough 
study by the representatives of the people.” Bricker has 
announced committee will soon call up FCC for general 
“orientation” meeting, and multiple ownership proposal 
probably will be hottest issue discussed. Also due for dis- 
cussion then is possible legislation to regulate political 
broadcasts. 

Counter-attacking in the courts, Storer Bcstg. Co. on 
Jan. 22 challenged legality of FCC’s new multiple owner- 
ship rules in D. C. Federal Court of Appeals. Storer 
argued that Commission has no statutory support for limit- 
ing any entity to ownership of specific number of sta- 
tions, that it must make determinations on case-to-case 
basis. Appeal also questions FCC’s rule providing that 
1% ownership in stations counts as much as 100%. If 
FCC approves purchase of Empire Coil’s 2 stations (Vol. 
10:2), Storer would be required to sell one vhf — leaving it 
owming 5 vhf, the maximum permitted, and one uhf. If 
FCC finalizes its uhf proposal, Storer could acquire another 
uhf station. 

Another controversial subject awaiting discussion on 
Capitol Hill is subscription TV — specifically the bill to 
classify pay-as-you-look as “common carrier,” introduced 
last July by Rep. Hinshaw (Vol. 9:31). House Commerce 
Committee under Rep. Wolverton (R-N. J.) will be tied up 
rest of month in public health hearings, hasn’t scheduled 
any consideration yet on Hinshaw bill or other TV-radio 
matters. 



Monroney didn’t doubt Lee’s sincerity, but expressed 
concern lest his presence on Commission might exert “in- 
direct influence on broadcasters, bringing an atmosphere 
of fear of pressure” on stations which refuse to give free 
time to programs such as Facts Forum. Lee’s comments 
on other topics covered in hearing : 

Multiple ownership rule — Answering a question by 
Chairman Bricker (R-0.), Lee said he voted for rule-mak- 
ing on proposal to raise ownership limit to 7 TV stations, 
while “not necessarily in favor of it, so that he may hear 
pros & cons, then make up mind. Discussion preceding 
vote, he said, indicated Commissioners’ “concern for the 
future of uhf.” 

Political broadcasts — “The whole problem will be the 
subject of consideration [by the FCC] in the next few 
months because of the imminence of the election cam- 
paign.” 

“Strike” applications — Commission is concerned about 
some provisions of McFarland Act, particularly those re- 
lating to “protests,” which can hold up construction of 
stations. FCC has investigated 3 or 4 suspected strike ap- 
plications, “and we still have no solid evidence — but per- 
haps we will.” 

Educational TV — Replying to Sen. Smathers, he said 
he favors educational reservations and would be “reluctant 
to turn reserved channels over to commercial interests for 
many years,” added he wasn’t sure he agreed that edu- 
cational TV should be completely non-commercial but that 
he has open mind on the matter. 



In other Congressional activity, House Ways & Means 
Committee inserted in new tax bill a provision specifically 
defining TV-radio show giveaway prizes as taxable — pre- 
viously subject to conflicting court decisions. And Rep. 
Keating (R-N. Y.) reintroduced perennial bill to ban TV- 
radio broadcasting of horse race information. 

■ 

TV advertising increased 35.2% to total of $688,700,000 
in 1953, when total advertising expenditures went up 9.1% 
to record $7.8 billion, according to preliminary estimate by 
McCann-Erickson Inc. for authoritative Printers' Ink ad- 
vertising index, appearing in Jan. 22 issue. Figures show 
more money is now spent for TV than for magazine adver- 
tising. While all media shared in gain, TV’s increase 
was by far the greatest. TV’s share of national advertis- 
ing budget increased from 7.1% in 1952 to 8.8% in 1953; 
TV-radio advertising now accounts for 17.8% of total 
U. S. advertising, up from 16.6% in 1953. National TV 
advertising was estimated at $529,700,000 in 1953, up 
30.5% from $405,800,000 in 1952; local went up 63% to 
$159,000,000 from $103,600,000. Radio advertising in- 
creased 4.3% to $707,900,000 from $678,600,000; it now 
represents 9.1% of total advertising, down from 9.5% last 
year. Breaking down radio ad expenditures, national is 
$379,900,000, up 2.8% from $369,500,000; local $328,000,- 
000, up 6.1% from $309,100,000. Total expenditures for 
other ad media in 1953 & 1952, followed by percentage of 
'increase: Newspapers $2,656 billion & $2,473 billion 
(lA'/i) magazines $663,100,000 & $615,800,000 (7.7%); 
farm panel's $30,800,000 & $29,400,000 (4.8%); dh'ect mail 
$1,076 billion & $1,024 billion (5%) ; business papers $398,- 
000,000 & $365,200,000 (9.2%) ; outdoor $174,700,000 & 
$162,100,000 (7.8%) ; miscellaneous $1,408 billion & $1,292 
billion (9%). For breakdown of Printers’ Ink advertising 
figures, 1946-1952, see p. 370, TV Faetbook No. 18. 

Reducing hour rates but raising min. are WABI-TV’, 
Bangor & KAFY-TV, Bakersfield, fonner cutting Class A 
hour from $200 to $150, increasing min. from $40 to $50; 
latter $250 to $235 and $40 to $47. KERO-TV, Bakersfield, 
increases Class.A hour from $200 to $250, min. from $40 to 
$50 in new rate card. 



- 7 - 



T ransmitter shipments reported this week: 
RCA Jan. 19 shipped 10-kw to WRDW, Augusta, Ga. 
(Ch. 12), due on air next month. GE reported Jan. 8 ship- 
ment of 5-kw to WDSM-TV, Duluth-Superior (Ch. 6), 
which gets temporary single-bay antenna Feb. 1 and is 
due on air in February. Slated to be shipped by GE Jan. 
23 is 20-kw amplifier to WSLI-TV, Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 12), 
which got 5-kw Jan. 12 and has latter March target. 

For existing stations. Standard Electronics Jan. 18 
shipped 50-kw transmitter to Crosley’s WLWA, Atlanta 
(Ch. 11), and GE scheduled Jan. 23 shipment of 6-bay 
antennas for KABC-TV (Ch. 7) & KTTV (Ch. 11), Los 
Angeles, both due to get GE 50-kw amplifiers this year. 

4 : 4 : % * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

KARK-TV, Little Rock, Ark. (Ch. 4), has its 25-kw 
RCA transmitter, but won’t finish construction for 8-10 
weeks, now plans early April tests, mid-April program- 
ming, according to v.p.-gen. mgr. T. K. Barton. It will 
begin with 58-kw ERP with antenna 340-ft. above ground; 
later goes to 100-kw with 1175-ft. antenna. Rep will be 
Petry. 

WMFD-TV, Wilmington, N. C. (Ch. 6), has ordered 
RCA equipment, plans March 1 tests from 358-ft. Truscon 
tower, goes commercial March 15, reports gen. mgr. R. A. 
Dunlea. Hour rate will be $200. Rep will be Weed. 

WPDV, Florence, S. C. (Ch. 8), will build $500,000 
studio-transmitter building and 750-ft. tower near Black 
Swamp School, plans to get going by Sept., reports exec, 
v.p. Charles H. Crutchfield. Owner Jefferson Standard 
Bcstg. Co. also operates WBTV, Charlotte and owns 16.5% 
of WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. Florence attorney 
Melvin Purvis is manager, plans 10 a.m.-midnight pro- 
gramming daily. Station is signed as basic CBS affiliate, 
also will carry programs originated by WBTV. Make of 
equipment & rep not reported. 



WTHI-TV, Terre Haute, Ind. (Ch. 10), has 50-kw 
RCA transmitter due in May, plans June 15 tests, July 1 
programming, according to pres. Anton Hulman Jr. Rep 
will be Bolling. 

WTOC-TV, Savannah (Ch. 11), hasn’t yet got its an- 
tenna, is borrowing one from another upcoming station, 
now plans to test 5-kw GE transmitter before Feb. 15, 
reports pres.-gen. mgr. William T. Knight Jr. Hour rate 
will be $200. Rep will be Katz. 

KVAN-TV, Vancouver, Wash. (Ch. 21), has studio and 
transmitter buildings nearly ready, but is being delayed by 
equipment deliveries, now has tentative March 15 target, 
reports gen. mgr. Fred F. Chitty. Transmitter will be 
across Columbia River in Portland, Ore. Further delay 
may result from protests to Portland City Council by 
property owners near tower location. Owner Sheldon F. 
Sackett also is applicant for Ch. 2 in Oakland, Cal. Rep 
will be Bolling. 

WMSL-TV, Decatur, Ala. (Ch. 23), RCA equipment 
ordered for March 15 delivery, will finish construction 
about April 15 when tests are scheduled, goes commercial 
May 1, according to pres. Frank Whisenant. Hour rate 
will be $100. Rep will be Thomas F. Clark Co. 

WCBI-TV, Columbus, Miss. (Ch. 28) plans to relin- 
quish CP and apply next week for Ch. 4, newly allocated 
to city, writes gen. mgr. Bob McRaney. Grantee is owned 
by Birney Imes Jr., publisher of Columbus Commercial 
Dispatch. 

4: % 

XETC, Tijuana (Ch. 12), located on Mexican box-der 
near San Diego, has cancelled order for Federal tx’ansmit- 
ter in belief that area, now served by San Diego’s two 
stations and Tijuana’s XETV (Ch. 6), won’t support 
another station. It’s owned by Romulo O’Farrill Sr., 
operator of XHTV, Mexico City, who holds CPs for other 
Mexican TV stations. 



Personal Notes: John K. Herbert, who resigned Jan. 1 
as NBC-TV sales v.p., returns to Hearst organization as 
exec, publisher of New York Journal- American; he is one- 
time gen. sales mgr. of Hearst magazines . . . Wm. H. 
Davidson, national mgr. of NBC Radio spot sales, named 
asst. gen. mgr. & sales director of WNBK & WTAM, 
Cleveland; at WNBK, he replaces Charles H. Phillips, now 
sales mgr. of WOR-TV, N. Y. and at WTAM, he succeeds 
Wm. P. Dix Jr., who takes same post with WOR . . . 
Julian M. Kaufman resigns as asst. mgr. of KPHO-TV, 
Phoenix, to be mgr. of XETV, Tijuana, succeeding A. G. 
Flanagan, now asst. mgr. of KCOP, Los Angeles . . . A. H. 
Constant, ex-KONA, Honolulu and KRON-TV, San Fran- 
cisco, named mgr. of KAFY-TV & KAFY, Bakersfield, Cal. 
. . . Fred Bohen, pres, of Meredith Pub. Co. (WHEN, Syra- 
cuse; WOW-TV, Omaha; KPHO-TV, Phoenix; KCMO-TV, 
Kansas City) named to top-level business advisory council. 
Dept, of Commerce . . . James Lobb, ex-WSPD-TV, Toledo, 
named production mgr., Earl Henton program director of 
upcoming KDAL-TV, Duluth-Superior (Ch. 3), due in 
March . . . Bob Lunquist promoted to program director of 
WICU, Erie, replacing Don Lick, now managing director 
of North American Film Corp.; Dick Johnson promoted to 
production supervisor . . . Norwood Patterson named gen. 
mgr., Ralph Sacks sales mgr. of grantee KSAN-TV, San 
Francisco (Ch. 32) ... Rodney Ford appointed news direc- 
tor, WAVE-TV, Louisville, succeeding Hugh Sutton, re- 
tired due to ill health . . . Warren Wade resigns as exec, 
producer, WOR-TV, N. Y. . . . Mavor Moore, chief pro- 
ducer of Canadian Bcstg. Corp. and one of its program- 
ming pioneers, resigns to resume acting career with Shake- 
speare Festival in England . . . Gordon E. Morehouse, 



ex-KOIL (AM), Omaha, named regional sales mgi’. of new 
KHOL-TV, Kearney, Neb. . . . Roger Pryor, TV-radio v.p., 
Foote, Cone & Belding, and J. James Neale, v.p. Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, awarded bronze medallions for TV- 
radio work in behalf of American Heart Assn. . . . Stanley 
B. Cohen, ex-FCC hearing div., joins Leo Resnick in Wash- 
ington TV-radio law practice . . . Fritz Jacobi promoted to 
press mgr. of NBC film div., reporting to new director 
Edgar G. (Ted) Sisson . . . Addison Armor named direc- 
tor of program sales, ABC Radio . . . Edward E. Hewitt, 
ex-ABC, named San Francisco sales mgr.. Motion Pictures 
for TV Inc.; Bruce Collier, ex-WMAL-TV, Washington, 
named Dallas sales mgr. . . . Alexander H. Anderson named 
TV v.p.. Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, San Francisco . . . 
Chet Brouwer resigns as TV director, N. W. Ayer & Son, 
Hollywood, to join Harry Owens TV Enterprises Inc., 
Hollywood . . . Samuel L. Northcross named TV v.p., Wm. 
Esty Co., replacing Kendall Foster, resigned . . . Charles 
Garland, gen. mgr. of KOOL-TV, Phoenix, elected pres, of 
Arizona Broadcasters Assn. 



More new FCC attorneys, all assigned to hearing div.: 
Ashbrook T. Bryant, ex-SEC; Walter L. Baumgartner, 
ex-Defense Transport Administration; John A. Cooper, ex- 
Justice Dept.; Joseph McCormack, ex-Maritime Commis- 
sion. New asst, chief of frequency allocation & treaty div. 
is Wm. H. Watkins, succeeding Louis DeLaFleur, now 
mgi\ of RETMA international dept. 

Wm. Cole Esty III, 59, founder and chairman of ad- 
vertising agency which bears his name, died Jan. 21 at 
his home in New Canaan, Conn, after long illness. 



- 8 - 



Telecasting Notes: “ Laugh tracks” on filmed TV shows 
are pet peeve of Washington Star’s TV-radio critic Harry 
Mac Arthur, who wrote Jan. 10 that “seismographs from 
Madison Ave. to Hollywood & Vine will shake” when pro- 
ducers count the people who refuse to watch such shows; 
he blames agency men for dubbing in recorded guffaws on 
telefilm sound-tracks in order to sell prospective clients. 
“A guffaw doesn’t make an unfunny line funny,” he says 
— and he opines that Bing Crosby’s recent TV debut is 
remembered only for “those horrible canned laughs” . . . 
Another illustration of changing pattern of network affil- 
iations being wrought by TV (Vol. 10:3): ABC-TV pulls 
away from CBS-affiliated KPHO-TV, Phoenix, to become 
basic on share-time KOY-TV & KOOL-TV; yet KPHO 
(AM) remains ABC and KOOL (AM) remains CBS . . . 
“TV is the current pushover for pic plugs,” says Jan. 20 
Variety, commenting on TV’s apparent softness for free 
blurbs for movies and pointing to actress Pat Crowley’s 
16 network appearances in 2-week period and Ava Gard- 
ner’s 4 guest spots within 5 days, both plugging current 
films . . . On-the-spot films and tape recordings made dur- 
ing American Alpine Club’s unsuccessful attempt to scale 
Karakoram, or “K-2” in northwestern Pakistan, world’s 
second highest peak, will be presented on NBC-TV Jan. 
31, 2:30-3:30 p.m., titled K-2, the Savage Mountain . . . 
First live show on 3-station Massachusetts uhf “network” 
(Vol. 9:49-50) was Jan. 22 forum. This Is the Issue, dis- 
cussing proposed state budget, originating in studio of 
WTAO-TV, Cambridge-Boston and rebroadcast off-the- 
air by WWOR-TV, Worcester & WHYN-TV, Holyoke . . . 
“TV Guide” now being published in 19 local editions, latest 
added in last two weeks being Kansas City, Houston & 
Miami ... Ft. Monmouth basketball to be carried by new 
WRTV, Asbury Park, N. J. (Ch. 58), which began pro- 
gramming Jan. 22, first game scheduled Jan. 26; station 
begins weekly series. The Mayor Reports to the People 
Jan. 24, featuring mayors of various communities in 
WRTV coverage area . . . Prizes totaling $75,000 in cash 
to be aw’arded in promotional contest slated by W ABC-TV, 
New York, involving pictures flashed on screen at various 
times of day for viewers to identify . . . TV-radio stations 
and disc jockeys being asked by Louis Braille Music Insti- 
tute of America, 140 W. 58th St., N. Y. (Albert G. Gorson, 
exec, director), to seek contributions for new American 
Record Club for the Blind, making available for first time 
records with braille labels and jackets . . . KGUL-TV, 
Galveston (Ch. 11) to open Houston studios in April in 
new Prudential Insurance Bldg. 



Flushed by success of Today (Vol. 10:3), NBC-TV 
launches new morning programming experiment March 1 
when Home goes on air Mon.-thru-Fri. 11 a.m.-noon with 
partic. sponsorships in format similar to Dave Garroway’s 
7-9 a.m. show. Details of new program were disclosed Jan. 
21 by NBC pres. Pat Weaver in closed-circuit telecast to 
affiliates. Show is aimed primarily at women, will fea- 
ture fashion and beauty tips, cooking, child care & train- 
ing, leisure time activities, shopping news, gardens, etc. 
It will originate from $200,000 permanent set now under 
construction at 101 W. 67th St. studios and will be among 
first network programs to include color inserts on regular 
basis. Sales policy will be highly flexible to permit partic. 
sponsorships. It’s planned to have eight 1-min. commer- 
cials, plus maximum of six 20-sec. spots per hour. And 
under “charter client plan,” any advertiser who contracts 
for 52 commercials before March 1 will receive one day of 
free sponsorship for entire hour during year. Two spon- 
sors have already been signed, identities undisclosed. Exec, 
producer will be Richard A. R. Pinkham, who’ll continue 
in same capacity with Today; Jack Rayel will be producer 
and Richard L. Linkroum assoc, producer. 



ALARMED by 3 fatal air crashes involving TV-radio 
Xx towers — 2 of them resulting from collisions with guy 
wires in bad weather — CAA next week will begin exploring 
new ways to make high tower guy wires plainly visible in 
fog and darkness. Meanwhile, CAB this week completed 
probe of recent crash in which Michigan’s ex-Gov. Kim 
Sigler and 3 companions were killed after hitting 
guy wii*e of 550-ft. tower of WBCK-TV, Battle Creek, 
Mich.; staff analysis blamed pilot Sigler’s use of “visual 
flight rules” in weather which called for instrument flying 
(Vol. 9:49). Earlier report blamed pilot for collision of 
private plane and WHUM-TV guy wire near Reading, in 
which 2 were killed last August (Vol. 9:33, 49). 

Proposal to study guy wire marking and lighting pos- 
sibilities will be discussed Jan. 27 in Washington at meet- 
ing of CAA’s airdromes, air routes & ground aids subcom- 
mittee of the Air Coordinating Committee. Group is 
expected to ask development of joint industry-Govt. re- 
search project to attempt to solve guy wire problems. 
Bi-oadcasters as well as tower manufacturers will probably 
be asked to cooperate. Problem is tough one, previous 
proposals on marking and lighting of guy wires having 
been discarded as impractical (Vol. 8:46; 9:9). “The prob- 
lem is no neai'er solution today than in the last 5 years,” 
subcommittee chairman Joseph Blatt told us. 

CAB report on Michigan crash gave ceiling as 400 ft., 
visibility three-fourths of a mile, with light rain and fog 
at time of accident. Plane, flying at low altitude, collided 
with top guy wire of tower, sheared off its right wing and 
toppled the tower, causing about $40,000 damage to tower. 
Staff analysis attributed crash to “pilot’s continuing visual 
flight rules (VFR) flight into unfavorable weather.” 
Analysis noted that tower was new but was marked on 
charts available to Sigler, and that 2 American Airline 
flights same day had bypassed Battle Creek because of 
weather. 



More realistic depreciation rates for telecasting equip- 
ment are asked by DuMont in proposal filed with Bureau 
of Internal Revenue. To bolster its argument, DuMont 
this week sent questionnaires to all TV stations asking 
their estimates of normal useful life and obsolescence fac- 
tors for various telecasting components, to help Revenue 
Bureau set up final depreciation rates for tax purposes. 
DuMont objects to interim schedule of depreciation rates 
now being used as general guide by Revenue Bureau as 
not giving sufficient emphasis to obsolescence due to tech- 
nological progress. DuMont proposes that composite over- 
all life of TV station equipment, excluding buildings and 
towers, be set at 6 years for vhf, 5 for uhf, as opposed to 
bureau’s interim rate of 15 years for audio, 10 years for 
video equipment. Other DuMont proposals (followed in 
parentheses by bureau’s interim rate) : TV transmitters 
& associated equipment, vhf 5-7 years, uhf 4-6 years (audio 
12 years, video 10 years) ; towers 6-18 (15) ; antennas, 
vhf 7-9, uhf 3-5 (12) ; fixed studio equipment 4-6 (studio 
equipment, audio 10, video 8-10) ; mobile studio equipment 
3-5; mobile field equipment 2-4 (mobile equipment 7). 
Copies of proposal and questionnaires are available from 
DuMont controller B. L. Graham, Clifton, N. J. 

“The big news in Canadian TV is that improved pro- 
gramming in recent months has caused a growing per- 
centage of the audience looking at U. S. border stations 
to swing to Canadian stations,” writes James Montagnes 
in Jan. 17 New York Times, adding that more live shows 
ai’e now produced in Toronto than in any other North 
American cities except N. Y. & Hollywood, with Montreal 
perhaps the continent’s fourth biggest production center. 
Greater emphasis on “lighter program fare” together with 
imported U. S. shows have brought Canadian TV ratings 
up, he says. 



9 



Network Accounts: New merchandising plan to tie in 

advertisers with nation’s food store chains will be launched 
in few weeks by NBC-TV under title of “Star Value Pa- 
rade.” NBC-TV will distribute pictorial displays featur- 
ing its stars to 20,000 food stores selling products of net- 
work advertisers. Displays will have room for inserts for 
local station designations. NBC-TV client pays propor- 
tionate share of cost of display material, for which both 
he and participating store can tie their product more 
closely to stars; network affiliates can establish closer 
liaison with retail food outlets and district sales offices of 
NBC clients. Promotion is divided into 4 separate 13-week 
campaigns, with each region getting one-quarter of year 
on exclusive basis . . . Ford Motor Co. claims 164 markets, 
nation’s biggest audience, for its Ford Theatre film series 
on NBC-TV Thu. 9:30-10 p.m.; it’s on 63 NBC outlets, then 
is sold to 101 additional stations within 48 hours, with re- 
gional Ford dealer organizations picking up the tab . . . 
CBS-TV continues to audition talent for its 7-9 a.m. show 
but maintains silence on details, won’t even release on-air 
target date; program is tentatively titled Eyeful, has 
newsmen Walter Cronkite and Charles Collingwood in key 
roles . . . Chesterfield’s dropping of Arthur Godfrey causes 
some realignments of sponsorships, Toni (shampoo) buy- 
ing weekly 8-8:30 p.m. portion of Arthur Godfrey and 
His Friends on CBS-TV Wed. 8-9 p.m. thru Weiss & 
Geller, and Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co. buying Mon. & 
W’ed. 10-10:1.5 a.m. segment of Arthur Godfrey Time 
simulcast starting Feb. 8 thru BBDO . . . Gillette signs 
3-year contract for TV-radio sponsorship of Kentucky 
Derby on CBS, thru Maxon Inc. . . . Dodge cars spon- 
sors Break the Bank, returning to ABC-TV Jan. 31 Sun. 



10-10:30 p.m., thru Grant Adv. . . . Old radio favorite, Don 
McNeill’s Breakfast Club, becomes simulcast on ABC 
starting Feb. 22, Mon.-thru-Fri. 9-10 a.m.; radio sponsors 
Quaker Oats, Toni, Swift & Co., Philco get first option on 
TV sponsorship . . , Carter Products (Rise shaving cream) 
drops This Is Show Business, substitutes Meet Millie on 
CBS-TV starting Jan. 26, Tue. 9-9:30 p.m., thru Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles . . . Jacques Kreisler Co. (watch 
bands) buys 11 partic. on NBC-TV’s 7-9 a.m. Today start- 
ing March 30, thru Foote, Cone & Belding; M&R Dietetics 
Laboratories (Pream) adds 79 partic. to 41 it already 
sponsors, thru Benton & Bowles . . . Beltone Hearing Aid 
Co. buys Fri. portion of John Daly Views the News on 
ABC-TV starting Jan. 29, Mon.-thru-Fri. 7:15-7:30 p.m., 
thru Olian & Bronner, Chicago. 



All-night operation by NBC’s 4 owned-&-operated 
dear-channel AM stations begins Feb. 1 on coordinated 
basis. Each using local disc jockey and programming 
separately “with music most popular in its area,” sta- 
tions are New York’s WNBC (already on all-night opera- 
tion). San Francisco’s KNBC (which recently began all- 
night programming), Cleveland’s WTAM, Chicago’s 
WMAQ. NBC’s 5th 0 -&- 0 , V/ashington’s WRC, is not 
dear-channel. Half the commercials on each all-night 
program will be sold locally, other half offered to na- 
tional advertisers by NBC Spot Sales — advertisers being 
required to buy all 4 stations. NBC also announced this 
week it wdll reduce sustaining network service by 101^ 
hours weekly beginning Feb. 1, signing off at 11:30 p.m. 
instead of 1 a.m. and eliminating its dance band pickups 
during those hours. 



Sialion Acconnls: “Multiple impact plan” designed to 
attain “multiple audiences and ratings at substantially re- 
duced cost to sponsors” was disclosed this week by WOR- 
TV following move to one-studio operation atop Empire 
State Bldg. Under plan, effective Feb. 1, 3 different series 
of live programs will be repeated Mon.-thru-Fri. 7-9 p.m. 
in which sponsor may buy, at comparatively low cost, pro- 
gram it.self or on partic. basis. To cut costs in single- 
studio operation, sets, props, technicians & rehearsals will 
be kept at minimum . . . Answering criticism that beer ad.s 
dominate TV, soft drink manufacturers and their bottling 
companies used spot TV in 67 markets in July-Sept. 1953, 
according to survey of 161 soft drink companies by Ed- 
ward Petry & Co.; 40% of commercials were on children’s 
shows or westerns . . . Scudder Food Products, for its 
potato chips and mayonnaise, sponsors Annie Oakley series 
on KMJ-TV, Fresno; KCCC-TV, Sacramento & KBTV, 
Denver, thru BBDO . . . Wage Earner’s Insurance Co. buys 
Drew Pearson Reports for WNAC-TV, Boston, Wed. 6:30- 
6:45 p.m., thru Silton Bros., Boston . . . Union Oil Dealers 
of Las Vegas sponsors Range Rider film series for 52 
weeks on local KLAS-TV Tue. 7:30-8 p.m. thru CBS-TV 
Film Sales; series is now in 105 markets . . . Bird.seye 
Foods adds 10 partic. a week to 6 it already sponsors, to 
boost chicken pies, on Chef Milani Show on KTTV, Los 
Angeles, Mon.-thru-Fri. 9:30-10:30 a.m. . . . Salada Tea 
allocates $1,000,000 for 52-week spot campaign in more 
than 100 markets, thru Hernion W. Stevens Adv., Boston 
. . . Carling Brewing Co. buys all 77 road games of Cleve- 
land Indians on WXEL; no home games will be televised 
. . . Chock Full O’ Nuts drops Jerry Lester’s Late Date on 
WNBT, N. Y., Sat. 11 :30-midnight, will sponsor new va- 
riety .show featuring singer .lean Martin in its place . . . 
Hartz Mountain Products (bird food) shifts Adventures of 
Captain Hartz from WABC-TV to WABD effective Jan. 
23, Sat. 4:45-5 p.m. . . . Among other advertisers reporteil 
using or preparing to use TV: Morton Packing Co., Louis- 
ville (Morton frozen pies), thru Ted Bates, N. Y.; General 



Foods Corp., Franklin Baker Div. (LaFrance bluing), thru 
Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y.; American Sta-Dri Co., 
Brentwood, Md. (Sta-Dri masonry paint), thru Gordon 
Manchester Adv., Washington; Branchell Mfg. Co., St. 
Louis (Color-Flye dishes), thru Calvin & Co., St. Louis. 



TV film will be $60,000,000 business in 1954, predicts 
.Ian. 25 Sponsor Magazine in lead article of information- 
packed TV film section, featuring survey treatments of 
these aspects of telefilm field: (1) Color— more than 60% 
of TV film producers replying to survey i-eported they had 
one or more series now being filmed in color. (2) Reruns — 
ratings are often as high as first run, sometimes higher. 
(3) Costs — $27,000 is average for half-hour drama. (4) 
Tips on film buying. (5) 14-p. directory of available TV 
films. (6) Directory of syndicated film sources. 

New officers of Federal Communications Bar Assn., 
elected Jan. 22: Vincent B. Welch, pres.; Percy H. Russell, 
1st v.p.; Wm. J. Dempsey, 2nd v.p.; Thomas H. Wall, secy.; 
Parker D. Hancock, treas. ; new executive committee mem- 
bers are Robert M. Booth, Jeremiah Courtney, Frank U. 
Fletcher. 

Cost of service to subscribers of new community an- 
tenna in Casper, Wyo. (Vol. 10:3), served with signals 
delivered from Denver via 5-hop microwave, is $150 for 
installation, $7.50 monthly, compared with average sys- 
tem’s $135 and $3.50-$3.75. 

National theatre-TV sales meeting, the first to be held 
dining early evening hours, introduced 1954 advertising 
and sales program to more than 15,000 Dodge dealers 
•Jan. 22 in theatres and hotels in 30 major cities, through 
Theatre Network TV Inc. 

New England TV Exposition, featuring industry dis- 
plays and sponsored by WWOR-TV, W’orcester, Mass., 
scheduled for Woi'cester Auditorium, Feb. 5-7. Space res- 
ei-vations should be sent to R. Neily Assoc. Inc., Statler 
Bldg., Boston. 



Trade Report 

January 23, 1954 



1953 TV OUTPUT WORTH ABOUT $2,375 BILLION; At average factory value of $170 a set , 
output of about 7,275,000 TVs in 1953 meant factory billings of some $1.255 billion . 
When markups, antennas, servicing and other costs are added, year's TV production 
represented approximately $2.575 billion to trade, compared to about $2 billion last 
year, when production was 6,096,279. 

It's proper to add about 60% as markup between factory and consumer, somewhat 
higher than year ago, say trade statisticians, who thus place retail value of TV 
production at about $2 billion . With addition of value of antennas, parts and cost 
of servicing, total comes to about $2.575 billion . Only item which showed substan- 
tial reduction in 1953 was servicing , amounting to average of about $20 a year per 
set, compared to approximately $40 in 1952. 

Radios also had banner year , dollar-wise. Taking preliminary production esti- 
mate of 13,361,505, total dollar value is placed roughly at $600,000,000 , up about 
50% from the $400,000,000 of 1952. Factory cost of radio was about $23 per set, 
roundly same as last year — but output was about 50% greater than 1952's 9,711,236. 

Combined TV-radio volume of almost $5 billio n, therefore, was achieved by 
the industry last year, compared with about $2.4 billion in 1952. 

♦ * * * 

TV production and sales moved sluggishly through January, which seems to be 
following normal pattern of post-Xmas slump month. TV production totaled 95,915 
week ended Jan. 15, second week of RETMA's statistical year, compared to 106,525 in 
preceding week. They were way down from the 529,240 TVs turned out in first 2 weeks 
of 1953 but set makers, holding tight rein on production , said comparison with year 
ago was unfair. Industry overproduced badly first quarter year ago, they agreed, 
and output this year is far more realistic and in tune with lowered demand. 

Radio production held up well — far better, in fact, than year ago. Output 
week ended Jan. 15 was 221,372 which, compared with 225,481 preceding week, gave 
2-week total of 446,853, way up from the 267,480 produced in first 2 weeks of 1953. 

Bad weather over much of nation aggravated normal January TV slump. As one 
set maker told us, "people in the northern areas are snowbound and wouldn't go out 
in this weather to get TV sets if we gave them away." 

It was still too early to judge effect of lower-priced sets on retail sales 
but manufacturers seemed confident that, given a break in weather, low prices would 
send sales up. Philco and Admiral now have all-channel 21-in. table models at $200 
(Vol.l0:3) and though no new price reductions were disclosed this week, rest of in- 
dustry is expected to lower price of all-channel receivers still further. 

♦ * ♦ * 

While RCA showed new 19-in. color tube this week (see p. 11), Admiral announced 
it would ship first color sets to dealers in second quarter of 1954 , added first 
color service training clinic would start Feb. 8 in Chicago, with 30-35 Admiral dis- 
tributors already enrolled. Priority is given to distributors in cities which will 
be equipped for color programs by June. 

More support for belief color won't deter black-&-white sales in immediate 
future came this week in scattered but consistent reports from distributors and 
dealers. Few dept, stores which have put color set on floor (see p. 12) report that 
prospective consumers gasped when informed of over-$1000 price for ll)^-in. screens. 
Despite v/idespread publicity, consumers still cling to idea that color sets will be 
almost comparable to black-&-white models in price. 

Meanwhile, industry continued to press its "truth campaign" on color, empha- 
sizing in local newspaper advertisements, distributor and dealer meetings what color 




10 - 



11 - 



holds in future and what black-&-white can do now. As example, Hoffman Radio Kansas 
City factory branch invited the sales and service staffs of local dealers for color 
demonstrations. Gen. mgr. Dave Doss told them; 

" The best way to knock down the sales resistance of the customer who won't 
buy black-&-white now because he's waiting for color is to show him this set with a 
12’i-in. screen and a $1200 price tag. After that, a 21-in. black-&-white set for 
5200 looks pretty attractive , especially when color programming in this part of the 
country is still something in the indefinite future." 



RCA'S PLANS FOR LARGER COLOR TV TURES: i^ -awaited details of 19-in. RCA color tube 
(Vol. 10:2) were disclosed to symposium of RCA tube licensees at Princeton Labs on 
Jan. 21, and it was announced that limited quantity would be available commercially 
in last half of this year . RCA officials also told licensees there are high hopes 
for producing, next year, the extremely bright focus-mask (grid) type of tube shown 
only once last year (Vol. 9:16); rectangular 21-in. version is planned. 

Salient features of 19-in. tube ; (1) Area of 162 sq. in., nearly double that 
of 15-in. now in production, but with same brightness and length. (2) All-glass, 
round construction. (3) Newly-designed gun, phosphors and shadow mask. 

Gun differs from 15-in . , in that it has magnetic controls Inside tube, elimi- 
nating need for external convergence controls. Improved phosphors are so balanced 
that there's no difference in decay time among the 3 colors; principal change is 
new red phosphor — zinc selenide . Holes in new shadow mask are largest in center, 
smaller toward edges — yet with no appreciable loss in brightness. To achieve 
larger size with no increase in length, deflection has been increased to 59 degrees. 

Discussing 19-in. tube , v.p. Ewen \C. Anderson told group that it uses "many 
of the parts, materials, processing equipment and associated components of 15-in." 

Regarding the focus-mask type , Anderson said: "We are pleased with the prog- 
ress we are making and we hope that [it] will be brought by us to a commercial pro- 
duction stage next year. [It] will produce a very much brighter picture than any 
presently known color tube." When tube was demonstrated last year, its brightness 
was estimated at 60 ft. lamberts, compared with about 20 for current shadow-mask types. 

Engineers at Jan. 21 symposium were shown two 15-in. and two 19-in. sets ; 
program was dress rehearsal of Dinah Shore show microwaved from New York. Samples 
of 19-in. will be shipped to set makers in second quarter . As with 15-in., produc- 
tion will take place at Lancaster plant. 

*\ *■ *•• * 

Pushing on other color fronts , RCA announced that it would offer critical 
color-set components to other set makers, on mass production basis , within 30-60 
days. According to Douglas Y. Smith, gen. marketing mgr. of tube dept.; "Produc- 
tion schedules will be geared to meet the needs of manufacturers who are expected 
to produce an estimated 100,000 color receivers this year." 

The seven components to be offered initially include deflection yoke, high- 
voltage transformer, several types of focus and convergence transformers. 

And on the station front , RCA is distributing new booklet: "Station Planning 

for RCA Color Equipment," describing equipment for various stages of programming 

network, slide, film, live — with details of function and price. 

GE is expected to disclose details next week on its station equipment plans 
which contemplate delivery of network rebroadcast equipment in Feb., slide scanners 
in June, film projectors in July, cameras in fall. 



DuMont has licensed A. G. Healing Ltd., Melbourne, 
to nmanufacture and sell TV sets in Australia under Heal- 
ing brand name. Healing now makes and distributes 
radios, appliances, bicycles and auto parts. Australian 
telecasting is slated to begin in 1956. 

Fimerson entered high-lidelily field this week with in- 
troduction of table model phonographs at .$100 & $i;iu, 
each with three 6-in. spcakeis, 4-tube amplifier and range 
of 50-12,000 cycles. 



Shipments of TVs to dealers totaled 6,000,380 in first 
11 months of 1953, when production was 6,765,000, accord- 
ing to RETMA’s state-by-state and county-by-county 
tables released this week and available on request. They 
represented 15% gain over first 11 months of 1952, when 
shipments were 5,208,614, as against pi'oduction of 5,175,- 
193. New York led with 549,478, Pennsylvania second with 
509,378, California third with 477,036. For Nov. alone, 
shipments were 695,308, compared to 690,711 in Oct. and 
856,855 in Nov. 1952. 



12 - 



Topics & Trends oi TV Trade: PhUco took the lead 

this week in setting up subsidiary to finance inventories 
and extend credit of its distributors in program which may 
well be duplicated by other manufacturers shortly. It in- 
vested $5,000,000 in common stock in Philco Finance Corp. 
to get subsidiary going for financing of distributor inven- 
tories on “all-year-round basis,” promises more details 
later. 

Other major set makei-s admitted they were consider- 
ing similar programs but wouldn’t elaborate. All said ex- 
tension of credit was one of major problems confronting 
distributors. Neither Admiral, Motorola nor RCA has a 
distributor finance plan, though all use Commercial Credit 
Corp. for dealers. 

The j'ear-round feature of the liberalized credit plan 
was regarded as one of most significant features of Philco 
plan. It enables Philco to spread its production more 
evenly during year, with knowledge that its distributors 
will be able to carry more merchandise in stock. Distribu- 
tors meanwhile won’t be pressed for cash since they’ll be 
given longer time to pay for merchandise, perhaps up to 
6 months. 

Philco announcement said only that plan will enable 
its distributors to “release their o^vn capital to finance in- 
creased sales of Philco products, particularly the rapidly 
growing Philco air conditioning business, and home laun- 
dry equipment, which the company is offering for the first 
time.” Financing plan was worked out with Pennsylvania 
Co. for Banking & Trusts, Philadelphia. 

Officers of Philco Finance Corp.: pres., Wm. H. Craw- 
ford, ex-Commercial Credit Corp.; v.p.-treas., Edward W. 
Mayhew, ex-Philco credit mgr.; secy. -operations mgr., 
Bradley Young, ex-Dearborn Motors Credit Corp. 

More TV layoffs: CBS-Hytron furloughed 400 em- 
ployes at tube plants in Newburyport and Salem, Mass., 
announced senior employes would work longer hours as re- 
sult. Albert S. Nelson, personnel director, said no production 
cutbacks would be made. GE will lay off 1800 workers at 
Syracuse plants and 350 at Auburn, N. Y. parts factory 
for week beginning Feb. 1 because TV set sales so far this 
year had “failed to live up to industry expectations.” Also 
this week. Local 101 of International Union of Electrical 
Machine Workers reported Philco had laid off 500 em- 
ployes in TV-radio div. in last 2 weeks — but cempany 
spokesman wouldn’t confirm or deny it. 

More color sets went to dept, stores this week, with 
others announcing they’d have sets on floors shortly. Hale’s, 
San Francisco, showed Admiral set and colorcast of Your 
Hit Parade drew more than 1000 spectators, all enthusi- 
astic until informed of $1175 price. Abraham & Straus, 
big Brooklyn store, demonstrated color slides on a 
$995 Philharmonic set. Macy’s and Wanamaker’s adver- 
tised they’d have sets on hand for demonstration next 
month. Ray B. Denham Co., Fresno dealer, also showed 
Admiral set and Polk Bros., Chicago, displayed Halli- 
crafters and DuMont set, latter store guaranteeing black- 
&-white buyers full purchase price as trade-in on color. 

Expanded tube replacement market is anticipated in 
1954 by GE, which announced industry-wide replacement 
picture tube needs are expected to be up 50% over 1953, 
receiving tube needs 10%. To meet demand, GE plans 
increases in headquarters and field personnel, plus boost in 
adv. & sales promotion activities, highlighted by announce- 
ment this week that it would buy min. live & filmed spots 
on Dave Garroway’s Today on NBC-TV starting March 2 
for 18 weeks to plug its aluminized picture tubes, with 
provision for service dealers in 51 areas served by program 
to run local sales message immediately following com- 
mercials. 



Distributor Notes: Motorola appoints Boyd Distrib- 
uting Co. of Texas Inc., El Paso (Robert Harbaugh, pres.) 
and Salyer Distributing Co., Albuquerque (John Salyer, 
pres.) ; Porter Burgess Co., Dallas (Motorola) names Al- 
bert D. White asst, sales mgr. . . . Bendix Radio appoints 
Peaslee-Gaulbert Corp., 2844 Spring Grove Ave., Cincin- 
nati (Ray Turner, pres.) and Delta Distributors, 923 
Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans (Andrew I. Meyer, pres.) 

. . . GE appoints American Communications Corp., N. Y., 
for installations in hotels, motels & institutions only . . . 
Admiral names Paul J. Dorsey, ex-Chicago factory branch 
sales mgr., as v.p. & gen. mgr. of San Francisco branch, 
succeeding Harold D. Conklin, now gen. sales mgr. of 
parent company; Chicago factory branch announces resig- 
nation of TV-radio sales mgr. Julian Rudoy . . . GE 
Supply Co. appoints Richard C. Porter mgr. of New Haven 
branch, replacing Patrick Damato, resigned; San Francisco 
branch promotes Wm. H. Struckman to TV-radio sales 
mgr. . . . Harry Knodel Distributing Co., Cincinnati 
(Zenith) promotes Paul G. Hagedorn to gen. mgr., suc- 
ceeding Rodney Young, now news director of WAVE-TV, 
Louisville . . . Gross Distributors Inc., N. Y. (Stromberg- 
Carlson) names Thomas L. Donnelly treas. & operations 
mgr. . . . T. A. O’Loughlin & Co., Philadelphia (Philco) 
announces resignation of Albert Spears as exec. v.p. & 
director . . . Crosley-Bendix Omaha branch mgr. Paul 
P. P.erson resigns . . . Emerson Radio of Michigan, Detroit, 
announces resignation of sales v.p. Robert F. Perkins . . . 
Horn & Cox, Los Angeles (Raytheon) announces resigna- 
tion of adv. mgr. John Paley, who retains interest in firm 
. . . George’s TV & Radio Stores, Washington, announces 
resignation of gen. mgr. Philip Keller. 

Grand-daddy of all sales contests is Hallicrafters’ plan 
to take 3 top distributor salesmen and their wives on an 
around-the-world all-expense-paid 28-day trip starting 
May 24. Next 36 distributor salesmen and wives will get 
week’s vacation in Bermuda or Mexico. Contest involves 
. cumulation of points for sales of TVs, radio & high- 
fidelity components, runs from Jan. 18 to April 17. Ca- 
.adian Admiral’s running contest, too, with $500,000 sales 
incentive contest offering 150 Packards, mink stoles, fiesta 
trips to Mexico and week-end at New York’s Waldorf- 
Astoria to dealers buying specified amounts of Admiral 
TVs and appliances in first 3 months of 1954. Not to be 
outdone, Sylvania this week took some 650 distributors and 
dealers on 7-day cruise to Bermuda and Nassau on $400,- 
000 junket. 

Ten-point sales planning program was advocated this 
week by CBS-Columbia sales v.p. Harry Schecter as pre- 
requisite to “TV industry’s return to hard selling.” His 
points: (1) Establishment of clearly-defined current and 
long-range sales targets. (2) Fullest use of business 
statistics & economic forecasts. (3) Sound sales dept, 
program featuring impartial incentive compensation and 
adequate product & sales training. (4) Up-to-date record- 
keeping, with close watch on costs. (5) Advertising care- 
fully planned for maximum results. (6) Year-round pro- 
motions at distributor and dealer levels. (7) Active pur- 
suit of replacement business. (8) Fullest use of all outside 
selling techniques. (9) Concentration on sales power rather 
than sales territory. (10) Selling products and its benefits 
instead of merely price. 

General Instrument Corp. plans public offering of 200,- 
000 shares of additional stock within next few weeks, 
through Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis and Hirsch & 
Co., the additional capital possibly to be used to take ad- 
vantage of any electronic “bargains” which might become 
available, according to chairman Abraham Blumenkrantz, 
who confirmed this week that company is negotiating for 
acquisition of other unnamed electronic parts manufac- 
turers (Vol. 10:3). 



- 13 - 



Tvadc Personals: Larry F. Hardy, Philco v.p. and pres, 

of its TV-radio div. since 1949, named to new post of v.p. 
in charge of product development, responsible for ex- 
pediting new products from research to sale; John M. 
Otter, v.p. & gen. mgr. of refrigeration div., appointed 
v.p. in charge of consumer products divs., with responsi- 
bility for coordinating merchandising of all consumer 
products, including TV-radio . . . Michael F. Callahan, 
plant mgr. at Newburyport, Mass., promoted to manufac- 
turing v.p., CBS-Hytron, succeeding Charles F. Stromeyer, 
upped to exec, v.p.; Edgar K. Wimp named to new post 
of director of gen. engineering. Dr. Russell R. Law direc- 
tor of research & development, Clifford Hughes mgr. of 
Newburyport plant, Elwood W. Schafer mgr. of color 
planning, J. Farley director of quality control . . . Humbert 
P. Pacini promoted to mgr. of engineering dept., DuMont 
receiver div., replacing Alfred Y. Bentley, now in charge 
of advanced planning . . . Robert Bach resigns as asst, 
mgr. of TV operations, Federal Telecommunication Labs, 
to join Fairchild Recording Equipment Co., N. Y. . . . Dr. 
Ivan A. Getting, Raytheon engineering & research v.p., 
reappointed chairman of electronics & communications 
panel of Air Force’s scientific advisory board . . . Fred 
Gregg shifted from promotion director of Crosley Bcstg. 
Corp. to adv. & sales promotion director of Crosley TV- 
radio div. . . . James T. Buckley, Philco chairman, re- 
elected pres, of Goodwill Industries of Philadelphia . . . 
Dr. W. R. G. Baker, GE v.p.; Dr. Marvin J. Kelly, pres, 
of Bell Labs, and Dr. Reinhold Rudenberg, Gordon McKay 
professor of electrical engineering at Harvard, initiated 
into “Eminent Membership” of Eta Kappa Nu Assn., elec- 
trical engineering honor society . . . Dr. Wm. Osborn, ex-U 
of Virginia naval ordnance research lab, named project 
engineer for development of new antenna types, Channel 
Master; Dr. Miao Yung-Miao, ex-International Harvester 
and graduate of Peking U, placed in charge of mechanical 
test equipment for antennas . . . W. Walter Jablon, ex- 
David Bogen (sound equipment), named sales mgr. of new 
home instruments div.. Freed Electronics & Controls Corp., 
N. Y. . . . Sid Block, ex-RCA, named midwestern sales 
mgr., Olympic Radio, replacing Morton Schwartz, now as- 
signed to Chicago factory branch . , . Edwin R. Wright, 
ex-Majestic Radio, named administrative exec, of Pioneer 
Electronics Corp., Los Angeles (tubes) . . . Arnold Hender- 
son promoted to asst, to Emerson sales v.p. Sol W. Gross 
. . . Edwin Cornfield appointed sales mgr.. Pilot Radio, re- 
placing James L. Benjamin, resigned . . . George H. 
Meilinger appointed Westinghouse sales mgr. for major 
appliances, Mansfield, 0. . . . Sidney A. Schneider resigns 
as Stewart-Warner Electric’s midwestern resident field 
engineer. 



Col. Reginald P. Lyman named Army Signal Corps 
plans & operations chief, succeding Brig. Gen. Emil Lenz- 
ner, who becomes commanding general of new Army Elec- 
tronics Proving Ground, Ft. Huachuca, Ariz. (Vol. 10:3). 
Col. Albert J. Mandelbaum was named to head Electronic 
Warfare Center at Ft. Huachuca. 

Arcan Corp. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. (R. A. Armstrong, 
pres.), formerly Transvision Ltd., has signed contract to 
manufacture Tele King TVs. Until month ago, when con- 
tract expired, it had manufactured Emerson TVs & radios 
for distribution in Canada by Canadian Fairbanks-Morse 
Co. Ltd., Montreal. 

E. W. Engslrom, RCA Labs v.p., named chairman. 
Defense Dept, research & development coordinating com- 
mittee for electronics, reporting to Donald A. Quarles, 
asst. Defense Secy, for research & development. 

Excise (ax collections on TV-radio-phonographs to- 
taled $65,748,000 for July-Nov. 1953, up 149c from the 
$48,920,000 collected in same 1952 period. 



Electronics Reports: Defense electronics spending will 
continue close to current high levels in fiscal 1955, despite 
over-all cuts in President Eisenhower’s military budget. 
In some phases of military electronics — notably within 
categories of guided missiles, aircraft systems, atomic 
energy, research & development — there will be increases. 
It’s impossible to break down electronics-communications 
into dollar values in President’s budget requests, because 
these items are included as parts of many different cate- 
gories of military spending. 

President asked total of $37.6 billion in defense ex- 
penditures, including carry-over in unspent obligational 
authority from fiscal 1954 — nearly $4 billion below the 
$41.6 estimated for current fiscal year. Major procure- 
ment expenditures will come to $14.5 billion, some 15% be- 
low current year’s $17.3 billion — but electronics-communi- 
cations procurement is expected to account for bigger pro- 
portion of this amount than in fiscal 1954, when govt, 
electronics-communications purchases were $2.7-$3 billion. 
President explained military procurement policy this way 
in his Jan. 21 budget message: 

“The reduction in the total Defense Dept, expenditures 
will be effected despite the fact that expenditures for air- 
craft, shipbuilding, electronics, guided missiles, construc- 
tion, research & development and many other defense pro- 
grams will continue at close to record peacetime levels. 
I am also recommending some increased expenditures 
[for] the mutual military program and for atomic energy 
which will bring expenditures for these 2 programs to 
record levels . . . The number of guided-missile antiair- 
craft battalions will be increased substantially . . . The 
emphasis on airpower is reflected in the objective of in- 
creasing the active aircraft inventory to more than 40,- 
000 during the next 3 years, with more than half of these 
aircraft to be jets.” 

* * * * 

Controlling interest in Weston Electrical Instrument 
Corp. has been acquired by Daystrom Inc., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Although deal probably won’t be formally announced for 
several weeks, it was consummated this week with pur- 
chase of 115,000 of Weston’s 428,221 shares (Vol. 10:3), 
putting Daystrom more deeply into electronics business. 
Daystrom is owner of American Type Founders, big manu- 
facturers of type and printing equipment, and Daystrom 
Furniture Corp., which makes kitchen furniture, etc., — 
but it also is already heavily in electronics, more than 
50% of its current output being electronic equipment, even 
before buying into Weston. Other electronics acquisitions 
by Daystrom may be in the works, company reportedly 
aiming to become “the Borg-Warner of the electronic parts 
business.” Weston’s latest financial statement shows sales 
of $23,779,742, profit of $825,395 ($1.93 a share) for 39 
weeks ended Oct. 2, 1953. In 1952 annual statement Day- 
strom reported sales of $46,200,000, profit of $1,410,000 
($2.25 on 624,911 shares). 

IRE 1954 convention in New York March 22-25 will 
have exhibits at Kingsbridge Armory, Bronx, instead of 
Grand Central Palace; latter has been leased by U. S. 
Govt. Technical sessions will be conducted at Waldorf- 
Astoria and the Armory, and buses will run to Armory 
where all exhibits will be on one floor — the largest unob- 
structed floor in U. S. Dr. Alfred N. Goldsmith, editor 
emeritus and co-founder of IRE, will receive Founders 
Award and deliver major address at March 24 banquet. 
Included in technical meetings will be sessions on color 
TV receivers and color telecasting, symposiums on TV 
broadcast transmission systems and “Uhf TV — Boom or 
Bust,” latter featuring papers by FCC chief engineer Ed- 
ward W. Allen Jr., National Bureau of Standards’ J. W. 
Herbstreit and MIT’s T. J. Carroll. 



14 - 



“Time has come when NARTB code needs to be tight- 
ened,” reported NARTB code review board chairman John 
Fetzer (WKZO-TV, Kalamazoo) at TV board meeting at 
Phoenix January 21 — and board quickly reacted by adopt- 
ing 9 amendments as major changes to be made in the 2- 
year-old voluntary program standards. They add up to 
intensive industry consciousness of “the problem of family 
programming.” Changes will shortly be published by 
NARTB in revised edition of the code, which Fetzer said 
is “now really working.” Major change finalizes com- 
mercial time standards, until now presented only as “sug- 
gestions” for the guidance of telecasters. These now be- 
come definitive, binding on the 200-odd stations subscribing 
to the code. Good example of tightened, though self-im- 
posed, restrictions is the new so-called multiple-spotting 
amendment relating to commercial announcements made 
between programs. It reads: “Even though the com- 
mercial time limitations of the code do not specifically pro- 
hibit back-to-back announcements, such a practice is not 
recommended for more than two announcements either at 
the station break or within the framework of a single 
program.” 

FCC budget of $7,664,400 for fiscal 1955, starting July 
1, 1954, is requested in budget sent to Congress this week 
by President Eisenhower. This compares with $7,400,000 
authorized by Congress last year. Because of reduced 
backlog of applications, budget seeks $705,600 less than 
last year for FCC’s “regular continuing activities,” but 
an additional $950,000 is sought for a new activity — “fre- 
quency usage monitoring.” Purpose of latter is to monitor 
10 kc-27.5 me to gain data to aid in 4 areas: (1) Assign- 
ment of frequencies and management of the radio spec- 
trum. (2) International negotiations. (3) Location of 
clandestine stations. (4) “Other national security pur- 
poses.” FCC reports 1342 employes in current year (aver- 
age 1200), to be reduced to 1264 (average 1137) in fiscal 
1955. Average salary is $5640. Commission processed 92 
TV applications in fiscal 1952, 936 in 1953, estimates 691 
in 1954 and 385 in 1955. For AM, respective figures are 
270, 441, 535, 299; for FM, 135, 160, 161, 160. 

Christopher Awards for TV for 4th quarter 1953 
went to producer John Haggot, director Alex Segal; 
writer David Davidson for Oct. 27 U. S. Steel Hour pro- 
duction of “POW” on ABC-TV ; producer Mort Abrahams, 
director Don Medford and writer Ben Zavin for Medallion 
Theater’s “A Day in Town,” Dec. 12 on CBS-TV ; to 
producer Lynn Poole, directors Kennard Calfee and 
Herbert B. Cahen for “The Christmas Star” Dec. 16 on 
DuMont’s John Hopkins Science Review; and to pro- 
ducer Felix Jackson, director Paul Mickell and writer 
Michael Dyne for “Master of the Rose” on SUidio One, 
Dec. 28 on CBS-TV. 

Conversion from AM to FM within 10 years, at cost of 
$9,800,000, is aim of BBC which this week announced deci- 
sion to build 51 stations in 41-68 me and 87.5-100 me bands. 
Move into aural vhf broadcasting has long been planned, 
but there has been bitter argument over virtues of AM vs. 
FM in vhf. Euopean AM service has deteriorated severely 
because of indiscriminate establishment of stations by sev- 
eral nations, particularly Russia. Germany already has 
extensive FM broadcast system. 

Two applications for new stations were filed this week 
with FCC; for Dothan, Ala., Ch. 9, by principals of WOOF; 
for Oak Hill, W. Va., Ch. 4, by Robert R. Thomas Jr., 
owner of WO AY. Three applications were dismissed this 
week, bringing total pending to 329 (66 uhf ) . [For fur- 
ther details about these applications, see TV Addenda 
18-C herewith; for complete listings of all grants, new ap- 
plications, dismissals, hearings, etc., see TV F'acthook No. 
18 and Addenda to date.] 



Regular industry audits of TV set ownership look like 
they’re as far away as ever, as NARTB television board 
this week passed buck to still another committee yet to be 
appointed by pres. Harold Fellows. It’s supposed to at- 
tempt to raise $75,000 for “pilot study,” along lines sug- 
gested in the still hush-hush proposal of New York re- 
searcher Dr. Frank Cawl, which envisioned a sort of Audit 
Bureau of Circulation for TV akin to newspapers’ ABC — 
one designed to show sets-in-use in specific station cover- 
age areas and thus presumably do away with some audience 
rating services. Meanwhile, crying need for authentic 
county-by-county set census on monthly, quarterly or semi- 
annual basis, which some networks and RETMA have in- 
dicated they would support, apparently won’t be met soon 
under NARTB auspices. Some board members clearly ex- 
pressed skepticism about ability to raise money for the test 
study proposed to be made in an undetermined market. 
Last county-by-county estimates came fi'om NBC and CBS, 
dated last April 1 (see TV Faetbook No. 17) \ next one, 
dated Dec. 1, 1953, is now being completed for CBS by Neil- 
sen for release in Feb. ( Vol. 9:46) , but there’s no assurance 
that either network will undertake to continue this exten- 
sive study on periodic basis henceforth. 

Condemning “invasion of uhf markets” by vhf stations, 
Ultra High Frequency TV Assn. Jan. 22 wi’ote FCC urg- 
ing “immediate investigation of the advisability of re- 
stricting the location of transmitters in the vicinity of the 
community to which the frequency is allocated.” Letter 
by general counsel Wm. A. Roberts specifically objected to 
application of WORD-TV, Spartanburg, S. C. (Ch. 7), to 
move antenna site to mountain 23 mi. from Greenville, 25 
mi. from Spartanburg. “We cannot concede that the Com- 
mission can avoid responsibility for the destruction of 
great investments” in uhf stations, wrote Roberts, re- 
questing “action favoring uhf operation in all respects 
. . . now.” Copies w'ere sent to all members of Senate 
& House Commerce Committees. 

NBC-TV has signed full 2-year affiliation contract with 
WVEC-TV, Hampton-Norfolk, Va. (Ch. 15), scrapping 
old one-year pact signed last June (Vol. 9:25). NBC 
affiliated the uhf station after Norfolk’s WTAR-TV (Ch. 
4) bolted to CBS (Vol. 9:20-21). New contract runs to 
Jan. 10, 1956, and NBC station relations v.p. Harry Ban- 
nister hailed it as “reaffirmation of our original and funda- 
mental belief in the ability of uhf TV to provide a valu- 
able and complete program service to communities wher- 
ever it is established.” WVEC-TV expects to occupy new 
Norfolk studios this summer. NBC-TV last May signed 
2-year agreement with pioneer uhf KPTV, Portland, Ore. 
(Vol. 9:21). 

Meredith Publishing Co. this week purchased WAGE 
( AM) , Syracuse ABC affiliate, 5 kw on 620 kc (1 kw night) 
for $200,000, subject to FCC approval — -as radio companion 
to its WHEN (TV) there. Publisher of Better Homes & 
Gardens and Successfid Farming now has an AM in each 
of the 4 cities where it has TV, other 3 being WOW-TV, 
& WOW, Omaha; KPHO-TV & KPHO, Phoenix; KCMO- 
TV & KCMO, Kansas City. 

Transmission of color test signals along with color 
or black-&-white programs, as suggested to FCC by Tele- 
chrome Inc. (Vol. 9:51) is perfectly permissible. Com- 
mission wrote to pres. J. R. Popkin-Clurman this week. It 
did suggest, however, that usefulness of technique may be 
limited. Clurman’s idea is that such transmission would 
make available to everyone — from stations to viewers — a 
reliable test signal for alignment purposes. 

Power increases: WSTV-TV, Steubenville, 0. (Ch. 9), 
now radiating 230-kw from interim antenna tower, moves 
to 881-ft. tower in mid-March. Share-time WHEC-TV & 
WVET-TV, Rochester (Ch. 10) Jan. 15 increased from 40 
to 125-kw ERP. 






MARTIN CODEL’s 

AUTHORITATIVE NEWS SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY RADIO NEWS 









tn thift 
issue: 



Commercial Abuses & Self-Regulation, pp. 

Scranton Area's 5th UHF — Total now 360, page 2 
Step-Up in FCC Grants and Decisions, page 2 
The Value of TV Network Franchises, page 3 
GE-CBS Color Camera Patent Tieup, page 4 
Comr. Sterling's Proposals for UHF, page 5 



with Electronics / Reports 

5.O.C.* TOEPHONE STERUN6 3-1755 • VOL. 10: No. 5 

, . t J 954 January 30, 1954 



Conversion Figures Tell Story of UHF, page 6 
Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 9 
Color Trends & Briefs (New Dept.), page 11 
TV Sales Go Up as Profits Come Down, page 12 
'World's Fastest Growing Major Industry,' page 13 
'Atomic Battery' Produces Electric Current, page 15 



With This Issue: Full Text of the FCC's Proposed Schedule of License Fees 

COMMERCIAL ABUSES & SELF-REGULATION: Even as NARTB telecasters* board was brushing 
up its Code of Practices at Phoenix last week to cut down on over-long commercials 
(Vol. 10:4), a group of distinguished Americans came out with the sharpest wallops 
yet at advertising practices on TV. 

" Opening gun in a movement to improve the quality and effectiveness of TV 
commercials," is the way public relations counsel Edward L. Bernays termed survey 
he released this week, containing essence of 111 replies to 575 questionnaires he 
circulated among leaders in education, business, religion and labor — whose opin- 
ions, he feels, might stimulate public to demand changes in TV commercial practices. 

The release got warm reception from the publishing fraternity, who gave story 
big play — -and there's no doubt it aroused sympathetic reaction in large segment of 
general public. Though identified in past with educational TV, Bernays states cate- 
gorically he's in this crusade on his own initiative — pro bono publico — with the 
hope it will give rise to stricter self-regulation by telecasters themselves. 

Telecasters won't like it — but, unlike the broadcasters of early years who 
either looked the other v/ay or ranted and raved when programming and advertising 
standards were criticized, most of the men who run today's TV stations are inclined 
t o liste n, search their souls, and regulate themselves . Anyone who reads the tele- 
casters' self-imposed Code of TV Practices (now binding on 203 of the 360 stations 
now on the air) knows the resolution of the industry to put its own house in order. 

Principal change in TV Code approved by NARTB in Phoenix puts teeth in the 
formerly voluntary restrictions on multiple-spotting, cow-catchers, trailers, length 
of commercials, etc. (For text of changes, see p. 7). But most replies to the Ber- 
nays survey criticized not length but content of commercials. 

The pitchmen, the hucksters , the phony doctors, the shouters — telecasters 
aren't proud of them, but they exist . And an enlightened industry knows that pre- 
tending they're not there doesn't make them go away but encourages them to stay. 

4: * 3): i|c 

Do present-day TV commercials meet "the public interest , convenience and ne- 
cessity" criteria of FCC? To this question by Bernays, most but not all respondents 
replied negatively. Many said commercials now are defeating their own purpose. 

Criticism came not .just from longhairs — though educators were predominant 
— but from business, church and union leaders as well (Who's Who people, mostly). 
Responses have been too widely reprinted in the press to necessitate quotation here, 
but these words and phrases cropped up again and again to describe TV commercials: 

Irrita ting, dis ho nest, mislead ing, phony, boring, repetitious, trite, anti- 
social, juvenile, insulting to intelligence, lacking in taste & dignity, etc. 



COPYRIGHT 1954 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



2 



Suggestions for improvement by respondents to survey : Fewer and shorter com- 
mercials ; elimination of poorly timed interruptions ; strengthening of aesthetic and 
intellectual appeal; reasonable and informative ad copy; establishment of industry- 
controlled panels or boards of censorship to pass directly on all commercials. 

It's noteworthy that no one plumped for govt, ownership or elimination of 
commercials — or even for Federal censorship. 

Yet, the industry can't stand too much of this — and it's to the credit of 
its leaders, particularly its C ode Review Board under John E. Fetzer, that it's mov- 
ing to do something about it. At least, the 203 dues-paying subscribers are — but 
it's ironical that some of the leading stations in the country, including some whose 
pictures are watched by FCG itself, are non-subscribers and/or egregious offenders. 

SCRANTON AREA'S 5ih UHF — TOTAL NOW 360: Only handful actually made it out of score 
or more CP holders who had reported they would start in January — whether due to 
weather or the now-prevalent disposition to make haste slowly and get started right . 
Up to this writing, only 4 new starters can be chronicled so far this year, latest 
being this week's WARM-IV, Scranton, Pa . (Ch. 16). None opened up a new market. 

That makes an even 560 on the air to date , 125 of them uhf. Quite a few more 
are imminent — but it's extremely doubtful, as things look now, that this year's 
crop of new starters will anywhere near equal last year's 231. 

WARM-TV gives Scranton-Wilkes-Barre area , regarded as prime " uhf country . " 
its 5th uhf outlet — nearest vhf being in Binghamton, N.Y., across mountains 50-mi. 
north of Scranton. Wilkes-Barre's WBRE-TV (Ch. 28), one of first to get on air post- 
freeze (Jan. 1, 1953), got \ihf off to good start in Scranton too, only 16 mi. away. 

WARM-TV began regular test patterns Jan. 27 after preliminary tests Jan. 19, 
will go commercial Feb. 9 with ABC network off-air from N.Y ., via one relay over 95- 
mi. span. Station goes into own new studio building same day, with 40x60-ft. main 
studio and latest GPL equipment. It has RCA transmitter & antenna and Wind Turbine 
tower rising 347 ft. above 1220-ft. Mt. Dewey. It's owned largely by Martin Memolo , 
managed by Wm. M. Daw son, starts with $225 base rate. Rep is Hollingbery. 

* * * * 

CKCO-TV, Kitchener, Ont . (Ch. 13), Canada's 3rd privately owned TV and 8th 
station in the Dominion, is revealed to have been testing since Jan. 1, plans Feb. 

20 commercial debut, joins CBC for network service Feb. 21. It uses 5-kw DuMont 
transmitter, 500-ft. Ajax tower. City is 35 mi. from Hamilton's CHCH-TV (Ch. 11), 
due to start in April; area hitherto has been served from Toronto, Buffalo & Erie. 
Dominion Electrohome Co. pres. Carl A. Pollock is 25% owner; radio CKCR, 25%; Famous 
Players Canadian Corp., 50% — latter also 25% owner of CFCM-TV, Quebec City (Ch. 4) 
due in April. W.D. Mc G regor is operations mgr. Base rate is $200. Weed is U.S. rep. 

STEP-UP IN FCC GRANTS AND DECISIONS: th mergers and other deals in fu ll swing , the 

FCC managed to grant 6 CPs , issue 5 initial decisions — some of them substantial. 
Week brought surrender of one CP — KSHM, Sherman, Tex. (Ch. 46). Week's grants: 

Indianapolis, Ind . , WISH, Ch. 8 ; Baton Rouge , La . , WJBO, Ch.2; Camden, N.J ., 
WKDN, Ch. 17 ; Sharon, Pa ., Leonard J. Shafitz, Ch. 39 ; C hattanooga, Tenn . , WDEF, Ch. 
12; Tyler, Tex . , KGKB, Ch. 7. Initial decisions favored: Elyria, 0 . , WEOL, Ch. 31; 
Tulsa, Okla . , Arthur R. Olson, Ch. 17; Charleston, W.Va . , WCHS, Ch. 8. 

♦ * * * 

Some hearings just aren't precluded or diss olved by mergers, faint hearts or 
what-have-you — and some are getting quite frantic. For example: 

(1) In Buffalo "strike" case (Vol. 10:2), Niagara Frontier counsel Thomas 
Dowd related how, after 18 hours of negotiating, he managed merger of 4 applicants 
only to find Enterprise Transmission Co. filing competing bid at last minute. In an 
agitated state, he and Niagara principal offered Enterprise counsel Philip Baker 
$25,000 to dismiss. Baker said he hadn't authority to accept; offer was withdrawn 
next day, though Enterprise subsequently did drop out, arousing FCC suspicions. 

(2) In Seattle Ch. 7 case , KVI counsel George Smith alleged that KIRO chair- 
man Hardgrove had once suggested that KVI attempt to block KOMO Ch. 4 application 
and get bought off. KOMO-TV has since been authorized, is now on air. 



- 3 - 



■ (3) In Mansfield, 0. Ch. 56 hearing , Mansfield Journal charged FCC counsel 

David Kraushaar with exhibiting an "antagonistic, biased and prejudiced attitude" 
toward it while favoring Fergum Theatres, asked he be removed from case. FCC Broad- 
cast Bureau shot back with long defense of Kraushaar, saying; "In the face of unjus- 
tifiable provocation, he exhibited the highest degree of self-restraint." It asked 
that Journal's petition be dismissed as "sham, frivolous and scandalous." 

(4) In Des Moines Ch. 8 fight , KSO counsel Benito Gaguine related that James 
Malloy of Cowles interests (KRNI) told KSO principal Kingsley H. Murphy Jr. that 
politics would decide case and that "Ike won't let the Cowles get hurt." Examiner 
French ruled the charge immaterial. 

* * * * 

Final court decision in long struggle of WSAL, Logansport, Ind. , to get FCC 
to allocate Ch. 10 to city was ruling Jan. 28 that FCC has complete and unmistakable 
authority to establish an allocation plan, and that WSAL's efforts to get the chan- 
nel were given ample consideration. Decision was written by Judge George T. Wash- 
ington, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. 

First industry comments were filed this week in multiple ownership proposal 
to permit owners of 5 vhf stations to acquire 2 uhf (Vol. 10:4). DuMont favors the 
proposal, but suggests owner of 5 stations be prevented from getting a uhf in uhf- 
only cities. Uhf Assn . , getting responses from 31 stations of 115 queried, favored 
idea and volunteered that "more important monopoly factors" in lohf need attention. 

Among other actions , the FCC this week: (1) Ended bitter WGAL-WLAN fight in 
Lancaster, Pa. after 'AfLAN dismissed objections, by granting WGAL-TV change of site, 
power and height increases. (2) Finalized addition of Ch. 18 to Zanesville, 0. ; 
proposed adding Ch. 3 to Rapid City, S.D. ; ordered rule-making on requests to shift 
Ch. 9 from Jackson, Tenn. to Tupelo, Miss, and Ch. 7 from University to Monford, 

Ala. (3) Set Feb. 26 for start of hearings for Ch. 11, Ft. Worth, Tex. ; Ch. 6, 
Paducah, Ky. ; Ch. 3, Phoenix, Ariz. ; Ch. 5, Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (4) Approved trans- 
fer of CP for KFXD-TV, Nampa, Ida. (Ch. 6) to Idaho Bcstg. & TV Co., Boise. KFXD-TV 
had gone on air last June 18 but folded in 8 weeks (Vol. 9:39). Boise group gave up 
CP for Ch. 9 in favor of KFXD-TV s Ch. 6 facilities. 

THE VALUE OF TV NETWORK FRANCHISES: There could be a trend to lower valuations on a 
good many TV stations — what with more competition here or imminent and, most im- 
portant right now, the enormous value of network affiliations and the strong bargain- 
ing position of the networks, especially the big billing leaders CBS & NBC (see PIB 
1953 figures, p. 16). Incidentally, there's also the factor of big capital outlays 
soon to be required for colorcasting equipment. 

[ For Stop-Press story on reported sale of WHBQ-TV, Memphis , see p. 16.] 

Effect of network affiliations on a station's value is strikingly pointed up 
in deal whereby Carl Raymond's 6-month-old KMO-TV, Tacoma, Wash . (Ch. 13) has been 
sold, along with radio KMO (5 kw on 1360 kc, independent), for only $350,000 plus 
the assumption of $150,000 debt owed on equipment. 

Here's a significant case of "economic retreat " — too much competition and 
loss of network affiliation. It's a case example of the key importance of a basic 
network affiliation for a TV station, especially in a major market. 

Price is lowest ever quoted on a TV station , let alone with an AM counterpart, 
unless you count recent sale for nominal $1 of KCTY, Kansas City (Ch. 25) to DuMont 
which was also forced by too much vhf competition (Vol. 10:1) ; and the 1949 sale of 
KRSC-TV, Seattl e, now the highly successful KING-TV (Ch. 5), for $375,000 because 
its then ov/ner couldn't take $1000-a-month losses and preferred to keep his radio. 

Proposed purchasers of KMO-TV are Miss Jessica Longston, Miss C.V. Zaser and 
Robert E. Pollock, owners of KAYO, Seattle (5 kw day, 1 kw night on 1150 kc, independ- 
ent) ; they with Mrs. A. T. Brownley own other radio stations in small towns in Wash- 
ington & Idaho. Oddly, KAYO formerly was KRSC, profitable counterpart of old KRSC-TV. 

Carl Raymond wants to take things easier at his Palm Springs home. An old- 
time broadcaster, he also sold his radio KITO, San Bernardino, Cal. ; KOOL, Phoenix 
(latter now enjoying halftime TV) ; retains only radio KIT, Yakima . He dropped CP 



4 



for KIT-TV (Ch. 25 ) recently, pleading uhf unsuitable for Yakima area (Vol. 9;49). 

Actually, Tacoma’s KMO-TV became an independent when KOMO-TV, Seattle (Ch. 4) 
went on the air recently and took away its NBC affiliation. With Tacoma's KTNT-TV 
(Ch. 11) on CBS & DuMont and Seattle's KING-TV on ABC, Raymond's KMO-TV was left 
without any network, and it's obvious he doesn't relish running it as an independent. 
(There's also every likelihood that when Ch. v'goes into Seattle , KTNT-TV will lose 
its CBS affiliation, especially if victor in competitive hearing is Saul Haas' 50-kw 
KIRO, a longtime CBS radio affiliate.) 

That means 5 vhf stations in Seattle-Tacoma area , which for all practical 
purposes is one TV market — to say nothing of one Ch. 9 educational grant and 4 uhf 
channels allocated, for which only one application has yet been made. 

So without a netv/ork , and even in such a major market area, can any independ- 
ent station survive, whether vhf or uhf? Some think not, pointing to troubles of 
some non-network TVs even in New York & Los Angeles. As station broker Howard Stark 
puts it ; " TV is different from radio . Not only are you playing with blue chips in 
a TV station investment and operation but, whereas in radio the trend is to local 
independent operation, you cannot compete in TV without national programs . Look at 
the big effort even the network-owned radio stations are now making with localized 
programming. But in the present state of TV, only the networks offer full-rounded 
national program services, which is what the public demands most." 

GE-CBS COLOR CAMERA PATENT TIEUP: -expected license agreement between GE & CBS 

(Vol. 9:41), whereby GE is to make CBS-type color cameras , was finally announced 
this week. Though the two fought bitterly over compatible vs. incompatible color 
systems in past, they now seek mutual advantage to combat RCA , which so far has been 
only company capable of producing the vital color cameras. 

Sales of cameras will eventually tell the story , of course, determining which 
company is on right technical track — in performance and cost. 

Announcement confirmed that GE will ship four of the new cameras to CBS by 
March 1 (Vol. 10;3), whereupon RCA promptly issued statement reminding that CBS has 
purchased 12 RCA camera chains for about |1, 000, 000 (Vol. 10:3), 2 for delivery in 
February and the rest by June. 

Principal claim for CBS camera is less expense . Essentially, it's a mono - 
chrome camera modified with rotating disc to produce field-sequential picture, with 
vertical scanning. Signal is then fed to a " Chromacoder" unit which rescans picture 
horizontally and converts it to NTSC specifications. Currently, 3 image orthicons 
are employed in coder; other tubes are being tested, including vidicons. 

GE estimates it will cost $6000 to modify Standard black-&-white camera for 
color and that coder will run about $40,000. CBS points out that one coder can be 
used with several cameras at a station. CBS has built its own coder; the 4-camera 
order with GE didn't include coder. 

If station orders camera already prepared for color , GE will adapt a new 
black-&-white camera — whole thing to sell for $21-22,000 — in addition to the 
coder. RCA color camera chain is $67,124, of which $39,500 is for camera. 

:)ci 9|a 

GE hasn't offered new camera equipment for sale yet , expects to have it for 
delivery second half of 1954. More definite information will be available after GE 
seminar for its field men in Syracuse, Feb. 22. 

License with GE is non-exclusive , so CBS can license other manufacturers if 
they're interested. Royalty rate wasn't disclosed, though Paul Chamberlain, mgr. of 
broadcast equipment, said it's about same as RCA rate. 

GE had said it would make both CBS and RCA types of cameras, but Chamberlain 
now says; "We're not at all sure we'll offer the 3-tube camera." 

Co ncerning performance of new camera-coder setup , marketing manager Frank 
Barnes says that analysis shows it can exceed capacity of NTSC specifications. 

It will take time to discern just how successful GE will be in effort to 
catch up with RCA's head start in cameras — for stations aren't breaking their 
necks to buy equipment right now. Six very substantial stations, plus CBS and NBC . 



- 5 - 

have purchased RCA cameras (Vol. 10:3), but most others see no sense in signing con- 
tracts until equipment has shaken down more and there's a color audience to be 
reached with costly local live originations. 

That's opinion of at least 2 of best-informed station officials in the busi- 
ness, both engineers and NTSC members — ex-FCC Comr. E.K. Jett , mgr. of WMAR-TV, 
Baltimore, and Ralph Harmo n, engineering mgr. of Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 

RCA was quick not only to note CBS $1,000,000 orde r but to report progress 
in development of its single-tube camera (Vol. 9:16). Said research v.p. E.W. Eng- 
strom: "We have sought to create a color camera that will enable direct pickup with 
a single tube that does not require coding and decoding from an incompatible to a 
compatible system. Our new single pickup tube achieves this result. Also, it is 
simple, flexible and rugged. While the new tube is still undergoing development, 
the progress already made assures its ultimate availability for commercial use." 

Continually improving performance of 3- tube camera. Dr. Engstrom pointed out, 
has made demand for one-tube camera less insistent. Nevertheless, he said, the one- 
tube camera still offers many ultimate advantages. 

GE also reported on plans for other phases of colorcasting . It is now pro- 
ducing equipment for adapting transmitters to rebroadcast color, will start work to 
modify stations next month — giving priority to those in cities getting color serv- 
ice from network facilities equipped for color. GE flying-spot scanners and slide 
projectors will be ready in June-July. 

Then GE disclosed its plans for a film scanner for first time. It will be 
continuous-motion type, working with flying-spot scanner, with mechanism produced 
by Eastman Kodak. Delivery is "end of year," price not estimated. 

Note : News of color has developed in such abundance that we've inaugurated a 
new department, " Color Trends and Briefs ," to give even greater attention to the 
more significant details (see p. 11). 

CONR. STERLING'S PROPOSALS FOR UHF: How can the FCC help uhf ? Engineer Commissioner 
George E. Sterling this week outlined 3 fields in which Commission may be amenable 
to relaxing or changing its rules to help uhf stations get off to better start. 

He also had plenty to say about how uhf telecasters might help themselves . 
Using Jan. 28 meeting of Boston IRE as sounding-board, he made these suggestions as 
to what the Commission might do if there's sufficient interest by grantees: 

(1) License boosters and sat e llites . "While present experimental grants do 
not permit commercialization , I would be in favor of waiving this restriction in the 
interest of uhf broadcasters who want to go to the expense of installing a booster. 
In order not to waste spectrum space, extension of service by one or more low-power 
transmitters should be accomplished on the same channel from which the programs 
originate, if possible." 

(2) Relax or lift limitations on directional antennas . "The Commission is 
open-minded on this subject and would welcome suggestions. To the extent that the 
Commission might relax its directionalizing rules to aid uhf stations in obtaining 
better coverage because of their power limitations, consideration must be given to 
the number of people that would gain service compared to those who would lose serv- 
ice or have it degraded, as well as the possibility of co-channel interference." 

(3) Be more lenient toward requests for extension of time to complete con- 
struction where grantee can show sincere desire to actually go into telecasting but 
hesitates to proceed on low power. 

Some low-power operations have given uhf a "black eye ." said Sterling — but 
he placed part of the blame on " a few overzealous broadcasters who were hell-bent on 
getting on the air before the 'bugs' were out of their transmitting installations" 
and who ignored problems of receivers, installation and cooperation with the trade. 

" I do believe that we should look favorably on applications for extension of 
time to construct uhf stations where equipment and land have been purchased and con- 
struction commenced but the permittee desires to wait for a transmitter of power 



6 



greater than 1-kw before he begins programming. I am not sure but what the FCC 
v/ould be doing uhf a favor if it suspended authorizing any more 1-kw transmitters." 

He also proposed FCC require proof of transmitting antenna performance — 
because of the haste with which such installations have been made in past, and some 
"discrepancies" which have been discovered in performance of some uhf antennas. 

^ ^ ^ ^ 

Uhf telecasters can help themselves , he said, by: (1) Urging manufacturers to 
improve sensitivity of receivers and converters — "some could be improved by at 
least 10 db by appropriate attention to design." (2) Educating dealers, servicemen 
and public to necessity of proper placement of receiving antennas. (3) Locating 
transmitting antennas as high as possible to minimize "shadow" areas. 

Sterling made big pitch for local programming as "key to success for many uhf 
stations." He compared local uhf station to local newspaper, pointing out everyone 
likes to see his own family, friends and neighbors on TV. 

Color originating equipment , though costly, eventually will help uhf tele- 
casters, he predicted. He cited local dept, stores as particularly good prospects 
for color sponsorship, and added: "Since vhf stations may have network commitments, 
local stores will be knocking on the door of the uhf color broadcaster." 

CONVERSION FIGURES TELL STORY OF UHF: Thirty-three TV markets can now be considered 
" completely converted " to uhf. Though many of them are regarded as "uhf-only" mar- 
kets, 6 can also receive vhf signals of "local" calibre. 

Fourth quarterly survey of vhf -uhf cities by American Research Bureau, com- 
pleted this week, shows tremendous variation in uhf penetration among the 73 markets 
measured. And once more it confirms the conclusions drawn from previous ARB vhf-uhf 
surveys (Vol. 9:24,28,41) — that the main stimulus to uhf conversion is the amount 
of good network programming offered on uhf which doesn't duplicate available vhf fare. 

Other factors involved in buildup of uhf audience , as indicated by the 4 ARB 
surveys: (1) Length of time uhf station has been on air. (2) Amount and.* quality of 
local programming. (3) Number of uhf stations receivable in area. (4) Size of city ; 
all other factors being equal, the larger the city the slower the increase in per- 
centage of conversion to lohf. 

Power, antenna height and terrain are important , too, but it's difficult to 
correlate them with ARB statistics because of number of variables involved. Because 
survey was conducted privately for ARB clients, we can't disclose city or station 
identities, but here are some conclusions we drew from studying survey as a whole: 

In 70 of the 73 cities , uhf stations carry network programming, though many 
aren't primary affiliates of any network. The 20 cities where programs of all 4 
networks are carried by uhf stations, had average uhf conversion of 74%. In the 10 
cities where only one network's programs were on uhf, conversion averaged 45%. 

All 73 cities measured are "vhf-uhf markets " ; that is, there are vhf stations 

within 100 mi., with only one or 2 exceptions. Another 10 markets, not measured by 

ARB, can be considered "100% uhf." Breaking down all 83 markets: 

Of the 33 markets with 80% conversion or more, 27 are beyond "easy reception 
range" of any vhf stations; the other 6 have one vhf station each. 

Nineteen markets have 50-80% conversion . Of these, 7 are beyond range of 
good vhf reception, 11 have one easily received vhf station. 

Six markets have 30-50% conversion , and only one of these is beyond range of 
good vhf pictures; three have one vhf each, and two have 2 or more. 

Another 25 cities have 1-30% conversion . In only one can no vhf station be 

easily received; 11 cities get good picture from one vhf; 8 cities can get 2 vhf; 

5 can get 3 or more. 

Conversion increased 15 percentage points in average uhf city between Oct. & 
Jan. surveys — not including those cities which had 80% conversion or greater last 
Oct. ; these were considered "fully converted" and weren't remeasured. Rise in per- 
centage of uhf-equipped sets varied from zero (in 2 markets with heavy penetration 
of good vhf signals) to 36.5% over the 3-month period. 



- 7 - 

Some more valuable statistics on economics of new TV stations — vhf & uhf — 
will be collected by FCC in second financial survey of post-freeze stations, cover- 
ing Aug. 1, 1953-March 31, 1954 and augmenting its first survey (Vol. 9:51; 10:1). 
New study will be particularly important because it will contain first prof it-&-loss 
tabulation for uhf stations in pre-freeze TV markets. 

* * * * 

TV industry produced 1,459,475 sets with built-in uhf tuners last year, or 
just 20% of total TV output, new RETMA figures show. Some 31% of sets built in Dec. 
were uhf-equipped at factory, or 139,657 out of 449,787 — down from 35% in Nov. 

Most TV manufacturers believe uhf set production has entered leveling-off 
period, will constitute 30-40% of industry's total black-&-white output for next 6 
months or so, having risen from less than 16% in Aug. to 35% in Nov. 

There seems to be general belief that advent of color will give uhf big shot 
in arm. This is probably a fallacy because : (1) It will be several years before 
color production will be numerically great enough to give uhf much lift via new set 
purchases. (2) Most colorcasting stations at outset will be well-heeled vhf outlets 
in larger cities. (3) The big set makers — with only one exception that we know of 
— say they'll follow same practice as in black-&-white , equipping color sets with 
yhf timers as standard equipment, charging extra for uhf tuners or strips. 

We think uhf v/ill get much greater boost from current price-cutting spree in 
black-&-white. Both Admiral and Philco now offer 21-in. all-channel sets at $200 — 
differential of only $20 for uhf continuous tuner, normally $40-60 extra. Motorola 
and some other major set makers can be expected to follow pattern. 



T IGHTENED-UP tv code, as approved by NARTB 
board last week in Phoenix (see p. 1 & Vol. 10:4), 
contains 8 changes — most significant being in section on 
advertising which finalizes the formerly “suggested” time 
standards for advertising copy and restrictions on cow- 
catchers and trailers, and includes new paragraph dis- 
couraging more than 2 back-to-back announcements. Full 
text of Code, before amendments, is printed on pp. 362- 
367, TV Factbook No. 18. NARTB is preparing, and will 
distribute to members in few weeks, new edition as 
amended. The amendments (newly added material in 
italics, deleted material in brackets) : 

Acceptability of Program Material — new numbered 
paragraph between (a) (i) & (a) (ii) : “Words (especially 
slang) derisive of any race, color, creed, nationality or 
national derivation, except wherein such usage would be 
for the specific purpose of effective dramatization such as 
combating prejudice, are forbidden, even when likely to 
be understood only by part of the audience. From time 
to time, words which have been acceptable, acquire un- 
desirable meanings, and telecasters should be alert to 
eliminate such words.” 

Subparagraph (p) revised: Excessive or unfair ex- 
ploitation of others [for personal gain] or of their 'physical 
or menial afflictions shall not be presented as praise- 
worthy.” 

Presentation of Advertising — subparagraph 1 (b) 
changed to read : “A sponsor’s advertising messages should 
be confined within the framework of the sponsor’s pro- 
gram structure. A TV broadcaster should [seek to] avoid 
the use of commercial announcements which are divorced 
from the program either by preceding the introduction of 
the program (as in the case of so-called ‘cow-catcher’ 
announcements) or by following the apparent sign-off of 
the program (as in the case of so-called ‘trailer’ announce- 
ments). To this end, the program itself should be an- 
nounced and clearly identified both audio and video before 
the sponsor’s advertising material is first used, and should 
be signed off both audio and video after the sponsor’s ad- 
verti.sing material is last used.” 

Time Standards for Advertising Copy — Paragraph 1, 



preceding table: “In accordance with good telecast ad- 
vertising practices, the time standards for advertising 
copy are as follows:” New paragraph between 1 & 2: 
“Reasonable and limited identification of prize and state- 
ment of the donor’s name within formats wherein the 
presentation of contest awards or prizes is a necessary and 
integral part of program content shall not be included as 
commercial time within the meaning of paragraph 1 above; 
however, any aural or visual presentation concerning the 
product or its donor, over and above such identification 
and statement, shall be included as commercial time within 
the meaning of paragraph 1 above.” 

New paragraph between 4 & 5: “Even though the com- 
mercial time limitations of the Code do not specifically pro- 
hibit back-to-back announcements, such a practice is not 
recommended for more than 2 announcements, either at 
station break or within the framework of a single pro- 
gram.” Last sentence of paragraph 4 is deleted. Para- 
graph 5 revised: “Any casual reference by talent in a 
program to another’s product or service under any trade 
name or language sufficiently descriptive to identify it 
should, except for normal guest identifications, be con- 
demned and discouraged.” 

Regulations and procedures, V Section 3 (b) , changed 
to read : “The TV Code Review Board shall meet regularly 
once each quarter of the calendar year, on a date to 
be determined by the chairman. The chairman of the Re- 
view Board may, at any time, on at least 5 days’ written 
notice, call a special meeting of the Board.” 

■ 

J. Walter Thompson Co. has supplied us with several 
dozen more copies of its Sept. 1, 1953 mimeo report on 
Where the Sets Are (Vol. 10:1), tabulating households 
and TV ownership in the first 312 markets of U. S. 
(Census Bureau divisions). They’re available to our 
subscribers as long as supply lasts. 

Big-circulating This Week, Sunday magazine supple- 
ment of New York Herald-Tribune and many other news- 
papers throughout country, names Leslie Lieber TV editor 
in move to increase coverage of the medium. 



PcrSOnsl NoIgs: Harold E. Fellows, NARTB president, 
assumes additional duties of board chairman April 1, suc- 
ceeding Judge Justin Miller, who retires on $7500 annuity 
and will serve as legal consultant on $5000 annual retainer. 
Judge Miller returns in April to his home in Pacific 
Palisades, Cal., where he will write books on legal phases 
of TV-radio; he will be honored at a testimonial dinner in 
Washington in March . . . Pat Weaver, NBC pres., and 
Robert Sarnofif, exec, v.p., will be presented to President 
Eisenhower Feb. 6 by RCA-NBC chairman David Sarnoff 
. . . A. E. Joscelyn resigns as CBS Hollywood director of 
TV-radio operations . .;. Hugh Terry, gen. mgr. of KLZ- 
TV & KLZ, Denver, hospitalized with heart ailment . . . 
Sterling Quinlan, gen. mgr. of ABC’s WBKB, Chicago, 
promoted to v.p. . . . Theodore H. Walworth Jr., ex-NBC 
Spot Sales, appointed sales mgr. of WNBK, Cleveland, suc- 
ceeding Charles H. Phillips, now sales mgr. of WOR-TV, 
N. Y... . . George Dietrich promoted to national radio mgr., 
NBC Spot Sales, succeeding Wm. N. Davidson, now asst, 
gen. mgr. & sales director of WNBK, Cleveland; Edwin T. 
amcscn succeeds Dietrich as eastern radio mgr. . . . 
Ernest E. Stern promoted to ABC publicity mgr. . . . Har- 
old E. Anderson resigns as v.p.-gen. mgr. of KOLN-TV, 
Lincoln, Neb., to join upcoming WDEF-TV, Chatta- 
nooga (Ch. 12); he will direct construction and 
become gen. mgr. of the new Tenn. outlet. . . . Harry 
Bubeck, NBC Radio program mgr. in Hollywood and vet- 
eran of 20 years with NBC, resigns . . . E. F. McLeod, 
ex-mgr. of WBML, Macon, appointed gen. mgr. of WDAK- 
TV, Columbus, Ga., under pres. Allen Woodall; Jack Rath- 
bun adds programming to duties as operations director of 
WDAK-TV, Columbus, Ga.; Johnny Hugenberg promoted 
to production chief; Jack Poole to technical director . . . 
Don P^ Molony, ex-WEHT, Henderson, Ky-Evansville, Ind., 
appointed v.p. of new WTSK-TV, Knoxville . . . Glenn 
Shaw, ex-KCCC-TV, Sacramento, named sales mgr. of 
KDYL (AM), Salt Lake City . . . Jerry Taylor, v.p. of 



Two more TV tower mishaps this week took toll in 
life and property. Steeplejack James Jones, of Jackson- 
ville, fell 400 ft. to his death Jan. 26 when 29-ft. section 
of new 1000-ft. Lehigh tower for WTVJ, Miami, slipped 
and crashed to ground as he was swinging it into place. 
Station’s promotion mgr. Burt Toppan suffered neck burn 
as piece of broken cable whipped by him. In Weslaco, 
Tex., $35,000 GE Ch. 5 antenna for upcoming KRGV-TV 
dropped 660-ft. Jan. 27 and planted itself 25 ft. in ground 
before 3000 spectators who came to watch steeplejacks 
for J. J. Phillips Corp. raise it onto 700-ft. tower. No 
one was seriously injured. Station had planned Feb. 1 
start, probably won’t be delayed too long because GE 
had another antenna on hand, shipped it out at week’s 
end. Two top sections of tower also had to be replaced. 
There was silver lining, though, and promotion-wise 
station, taking advantage of accident’s news value, offered 
$200 in prizes for best amateur photographs of crash. 

Ad hoc committee to study tower lighting & marking 
problems as they relate to aircraft will be named by 
airdromes, air routes & ground aids (AG A) subcom- 
mittee of CAA’s Air Coordinating Committee at next 
meeting, probably Feb. 10. At Jan. 27 meeting, sub- 
committee began preliminary discussions aimed at de- 
ciding whether methods should be devised to mark and 
light guy wires of high towers (Vol. 10:4). Committee 
will be composed of representatives of govt, and private 
agencies concerned with aviation, FCC, tower manufac- 
turers, RETMA, NARTB. At this week’s subcommittee 
meeting. Bureau of Standards representative reported 
on preliminary study made for Navy of possibility of 
using flashing .beacons on ground near base of tower 
to warn pilots when visibility is limited. 



KMBC-TV & KMBC, Kansas City, who runs St. Mary’s 
Lodge at Estes Park, Colo., has opened another — Lake 
Pleasant Inn, Beardsley, Ariz., about 45 mi. from Phoenix 
. . . Miss Claire Collins promoted to supervisor of ABC 
TV-radio sustaining traffic, succeeding Mrs. Jane Hagan 
Farno, resigned . . . Dan Lindquist promoted to production 
director, KCOP, Los Angeles; Don Forbes resigns as pro- 
gram mgr. . . . Richard H. Gourley, ex-WSPD-TV & WSPD, 
Toledo, appointed director of public relations, Edward 
Lamb Enterprises Inc. . . . Joan Thompson appointed Du- 
Mont coordinator of religious programs . . . Jack Simonsen 
assigned by CBC to upcoming CBHT, Halifax, N.S., due 
on air next fall, as technical director . . . Tom Flynn, ex- 
CBS and WOR, named DuMont account supervisor, David 
Alber Assoc., N. Y. . . . John McPartlin resigns as sales 
mgr. of WNBQ to join Chicago sales div. of Motion Pic- 
tures for Television Inc. . . . Thomas S. Cadden joins TV- 
radio dept, of Krupnick & Assoc., St. Louis . . . Jack 
Creamer joins Young & Rubicam TV-radio dept, in charge 
of General Foods accounts . . . Richard P. Buch named 
Atlanta office mgr. of CBS TV Film Sales ... A. M, 
Martinez, ex-Melchor Guzman Co. rep firm, named v.p. 
of new Caribbean Networks Inc. . . . J. Robert Covington, 
asst. v.p. for sales & promotion, and Kenneth I. Tredwell, 
asst. v.p. for programs, promoted to v.p.’s of Jefferson 
Standard Bcstg. Co. (WBTV & WBT, Charlotte) . . . 
Myron J. Bennett, newsman and onetime candidate for 
Gov. of Iowa, named program mgr. of KSTM-TV, St. Louis. 



Judge Justin Miller, retiring chairman of NARTB, ex- 
dean of Duke U Law School, and onetime pres, of Federal 
Bar Assn., named chairman of a Federal Bar Assn, com- 
mittee to draw up a report on “dismissals from govt, 
service.” 

Arthur B. Donegan, 44, publicity-promotion mgr. of 
WABC and ex-asst. publicity mgr. of ABC, died Jan. 22 
at his N. Y. home after long illness. 



“Round robin” microwave route encircling north- 
eastern quarter of nation will be completed this week by 
AT&T when new New York-Albany and Buffalo-Cleve- 
land sections will be ready for use. System follows 2400- 
mi. circular route, connects New York, Albany, Buffalo, 
Chicago, St. Louis, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Washington 
with cities in between — and then back to New York. It 
will be arranged so that any interconnected station can 
originate program and transmit it to all others on system. 
Actual operation of full loop is expected late this summer. 
System ultimately will have 4 channels. N. Y.-Albany 
route has 3 channels, Buffalo-Cleveland 2. First network 
service for Albuquerque, only pre-freeze city non-inter- 
connected, has been ordered for KGGM-TV by CBS. AT&T 
is expected to provide service by fall, probably by micro- 
wave from Amarillo. Tentative Feb. 1 date is set for 
these AT&T network interconnections: WRDW-TV, Au- 
gusta, Ga.; WCSC-TV, Charleston, S. C.; KOMU-TV, Co- 
lumbia, Mo.; KHOL, Kearney, Neb.; WTOC-TV, Savan- 
nah; KWFT-TV & KFDX-TV, Wichita Falls, Tex.; 
WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich. 

Pacific broadcaster J. Elroy McCaw acquired 75% 
and Jack Keating 25% ownership of WINS, New York 
(50 kw on 1010 kc, independent) this week in $450,000 
purchase deal recently appi'oved by FCC (Vol. 9:32,52). 
Seller was Crosley, which originally paid more than $1,- 
000,000 for station. Theatreman Charles Skouras, origi- 
nally announced as prospective 50 %> purchaser, pulled out 
of deal and the McCaw-Keating combination was banked by 
Bankers Trust Co., N. Y. Broker Howard Stark handled 
deal. McCaw is required by FCC to divest himself by 
Feb. 15 of his interests in AMs KPOA, Honolulu; KILO, 
Hilo; KORC, Mineral Wells, Tex. 



T ransmitter shipments have trickled down to small 
flow, with no more waiting lists for equipment and 
manufacturers saying they can fill new orders promptly 
now. This week, RCA shipped 10-kw transmitter to 
WMUR-TV, Manchester, N. H. (Ch. 9), which should get 
on air in Feb., and on Feb. 1 DuMont ships 5-kw by boat 
to KULA-TV, Honolulu (Ch. 4), due in March. 

GE reported no new-station shipments, but on Jan. 
25 it sent 20-kw amplifier to 5-kw KVTV, Sioux City, la. 
(Ch. 9), and this week its engineers were testing new 
l2-kw transmitter for KJEO, Fresno, Cal. (Ch. 47), and 
were checking out new 35-kw of V/OI-TV, Ames, la. (Ch. 
5). DuMont also sent new 5-kw to WNHC-TV, New 
Haven, Conn. (Ch. 8). 

♦ * * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

KHTV, Salt Lake City (Ch. 2), owned by Frank C. 
Carman-Grant Wrathall group, will have transmitter- 
house ready by June when it’s due to get composite trans- 
mitter being custom-built in own Salt Lake City work- 
shops. It plans Aug. tests with 150-ft. Blaw-Knox tower, 
will go commercial Aug. 15, affiliated with ABC, reports 
pres. Frank C. Carman. Rep will be Hollingbery, who will 
offer it under “group market plan” along with 4 other 
stations with interlocking ownership — KOPR-TV, Butte, 
Mont. (Ch. 4), which began last Aug.; KWIK-TV, Poca- 
tello, Ida. (Ch. 10)., and KLIX-TV, Twin Falls, Ida. (Ch. 
11), both due this spring; KIFT, Idaho Falls (Ch. 8), due 
next fall. 

WMTW, Poland, Me. (Ch. 8 assigned to Lewiston), 
designed to be super-coverage outlet atop 6288-ft. Mt. 
Washington, N. H., this week named John H. Norton Jr., 
ex-ABC Central Div. v.p., as gen. mgr., effective Feb. 1. 
Last announced target date was end of summer 1954, but 
it’s expected station, jointly owned by New England radio 
interests headed by ex-Washington radio attorney John H. 
Guider, will go into operation before that. Studio con- 
struction is already underway at Poland, where the Ricker 
Inn, on grounds of famed Poland Spring House, is being 
renovated for purpose. Harrington, Righter & Parsons 
will be rep. 

WDXI-TV, Jackson, Tenn. (Ch. 9), has ordered Du- 
Mont equipment for April delivery when construction is 
scheduled for completion, plans July tests, goes commer- 
cial in Aug., reports pres.-gen. mgr. Aaron B. Robinson, 
who also publishes Corinth (Miss.) Corhithian and oper- 
ates radio WCMA, Corinth; WDXI, Jackson; WENK, 
Union City — all in Tenn. Rep will be Burn-Smith. 

WTIK-TV, Durham, N. C. (Ch. 11), hasn’t begun con- 
struction yet, but has DuMont equipment on order, plans 
start next Sept., according to pres. Harmon L. Duncan. 
Rep not yet chosen. 

WRDW-TV, Augusta, Ga. (Ch. 12), has its 10-kw 
RCA transmitter, plans Feb. 1 tests using 425-ft. Emsco 
tower topped by 74-ft. 12-bay RCA antenna, goes com- 
mercial Feb. 8 with CBS-TV affiliation, according to gen. 
mgr. W. Ray Ringson. Exec. v.p. Allen M. Woodall also 
owns 50'7f of WDAK-TV, Columbus, and has interest in 
WETV, Macon. Hour rate will be .$200. Headley-Reed 
will be rep. 

WGAN-TV, Portland, Me. (Ch. 13), has rescheduled 
target from Feb. 1 to May 1, goes commercial May 16, 
reports gen. mgr. C. E. Gatchell. Its 20-kw GE trans- 
mitter and 240-ft. Truscon tower surmounted by 74-ft. 
12-bay superturnstile antenna, 626-ft. above av. terrain, 
will be atop Blackstrap Hill in W. Falmouth, Me. Owner 
Gannett Co. Inc. publishes Portland Press-Herald and Ex- 
press and other Maine newspapers. Hour rate will be 
$250. Avery-Knodel will be rep. 



WQED, Pittsburgh (Ch. 13, educational), now plans 
Feb. 15 tests with 5-kw DuMont transmitter being in- 
stalled on Herron Hill, overlooking Pitt Stadium. It will 
use Westinghouse’s KDKA-FM tower. Studios at 4337 
Fifth Ave. are in historic building donated to U of Pitts- 
burgh by Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. Grants totaling 
$350,000 to get started came from the Arbuckle- Jamison 
Foundation, Ford Foundation and A. W. Mellon Trust. 
Operating funds depend on allocations by schools, public 
subscriptions and gifts. Schools in 10-county area around 
city have been asked to contribute 30^ a year for each 
child. Families with TV are asked to subscribe $2 for 
monthly WQED Program Previews. To boost subscribers 
and to get “to the grass roots for program sources,” 
WQED is organizing neighborhood Subscribers Television 
Guilds. For each block of 500 subscriptions from a Guild, 
WQED will place a TV set in a school or other institution 
designated by the group. William A. Wood, ex-CBS-TV 
Washington director of public affairs, is gen. mgr.; Ed- 
ward C. Horstman, ex-ABC Chicago, chief engineer. 

WJPB-TV, Fairmont, W. Va. (Ch. 35), which orig- 
inally expected to get under way with only $117,565 in- 
vestment in equipment (Vol. 9:50), has revised original 
estimate to “under $123,000” which pres. J. Patrick Beacom 
regards as record low for any station with complete camera 
chain. He’s seeking CP modification to tilt beam, now 
plans Feb. 15 start with 1-kw Continental transmitter, 
will use 230-ft. Blaw-Knox tower from which FM antenna 
has been moved to another location. Hour rate will be 
$200. Rep will be Headley-Reed. 



Life Magazine again takes full-page ads in N. Y. news- 
papers Jan. 29 to show “how business ranks national ad- 
vertising media” — with itself in first place with 1953 reve- 
nues of $109,708,903. Next ranking (all PIB gross 
figures): (2) CBS-TV, $97,466,809; (3) NBC-TV, $96,- 
658,551; (4) Saturday Evening Post, $80,865,877; (5) 
CBS-Radio, $62,381,207; (6) NBC-Radio, $45,151,077; (7) 
Time, $35,391,178; (8) ABC-Radio, $29,826,123; (9) Bet- 
ter Homes & Gardens, $27,240,924; (10) This Week, $26,- 
822,080; (11) MBS-Radio, $23,158,000; (12) Look, $22,- 
971,144; (13) ABC-TV, $21,110,680; (14) Ladies’ Home 
Journal, $19,660,979; (15) Good Housekeeping, $16,324,- 
132; (16) Collier’s, $16,310,942; (17) American Weekly, 
$15,904,772; (18) Newsweek, $15,205,490; (19) McCall’s, 
$13,165,666; (20) Business Week, $13,150,555. 

“Traffic cop” concept of FCC’s functions — mere ar- 
biter of electrical interference problems — was deplored 
by Comr. Robert T. Bartley in Jan. 29 address at Radio 
& TV Institute at U of Georgia, Athens. Citing Supreme 
Court decisions and Congressional actions, he said it was 
FCC’s duty to “inquire not only into the technical feas- 
ibility of the proposed operation, but also into the 
more important aspects affecting the service to the 
public which will result from the grant of a broadcast 
license.” He also frowned on those entering broadcast- 
ing for a “fast buck” and on absentee ownership. Dis- 
cussing monopoly, he endorsed policy of multiple owner- 
ship, saying it permits networks to provide better service. 

DuMont reorganized broadcast equipment setup this 
week, abolishing TV transmitter div. and creating trans- 
mitter dept, under new communication products div. (Her- 
bert E. Taylor Jr., mgr.) in move which will “greatly en- 
large production, sales and distribution” of broadcast 
equipment. It said sales of such equipment in 1953 were 
80% gi’eater than in 1952 and 167% over 1951. New dept, 
is headed by James B. Tharpe, national sales mgr. of old 
transmitter div. Charles E. Spicer is sales operations 
mgr., with these district mgrs. : Lewis C. Radford, eastern; 
Herbert Bloomberg, central; Robert J. Myers, western; 
Thomas B. Moseley, southern. 



10 



TclGCSStiny NoIGS: Another big radio station boldly 

hikes daytime rates — CBS’s KNX, Hollywood, which this 
week released Rate Card No. 13 upping rates Jan. 31 by 
15.4%, first rise since March 1946; it’s based on 38.8% in- 
crease in radio homes and claim of 108.2% increase in 
delivered daytime audience . . . Radio’s thriving 1953 re- 
flected in newly issued 1954 Broadcasting Yearbook 
guesstimate of aggregate AM times sales of $498,428,000, 
up $25,000,000 from 1952, with only network down (see 
also PIB report, p. 16) but with spot & local up; figure is 
broken down thus: local $257,254,000, spot $144,595,000, 
national network $89,528,000, regional network $7,051,000 
— all net time sales after discounts but before commissions 
to agencies & reps . . . Best TV guesstimate for 1953 is 
still $450-475,000,000, up from official FCC figure of $324,- 
000,000 in 1952 (Vol. 9:52) — but true figures won’t be 
available until reported by FCC auditors in spring; 
Printers’ Ink places time-&-talent expenditures by adver- 
tisers at $688,700,000, up 35.2%, in its McCann-Erickson 
survey Jan. 22 (Vol. 10:4) . . . TV rate trend continues 
upward (see TV Faethook No. 18) and these are latest to 
raise tariffs: KGMB-TV, Honolulu, Class A hour from 
$200 to $300, min. $40 to $60; WTVI, St. Louis, hour re- 
mains $400 but 1-min. up from $40 to $60; WTVN, Colum- 
bus, hour remains $500, min. up from $80 to $100; WKST- 
TV, New Castle, Pa., hour remains $200, min. up from $30 
to $40 . . . Wm. F. Broidy in deal with Robert L. Lippert 
whereby he will produce 12 features for Lippert release 
and will take over all Lippert TV sales, to be handled thru 
Official Films Inc. . . . Another TV hit to become feature 
film: Warner Bros, signs Jack Webb (thru Mark VII 
Ltd.) to make full-length movie out of Dragnet . . . 
W arner Bros, sets up new TV-radio unit in adv.-publicity 
dept., headed by Frank Hobbs, to concentrate on buying 
time to promote its pictures; Mort Blumenstock is v.p. in 
charge, with Hobbs reporting to Gill Golden, adv. mgr., and 
Larry Golob, eastern publicity director . . . Rabco Inc. is 
new TV film production company organized by ABC, pro- 
ducer Hal Roach Jr. and Wm. Morris Agency; new firm 
reportedly will go into large-scale production of TV films 



to be distributed through ABC Syndication . . . 1200 
theatres closed their doors in 1953, compared to 973 in 
1952 & 886 in 1951, reports Hollywood Daily Variety in 
preview of testimony to be presented to Congress by ex- 
hibitors seeking elimination of 20% admission tax; Presi- 
dent Eisenhower vetoed similar bill last year . . . Who 
views re-runs of TV film? Audience isn’t all new, A. C. 
Neilsen Co. found out in special survey of audiences of 13 
shows for ABC, CBS & NBC; study indicates 34% of 
original audience watched same shows again on second 
run . . . Phonograph record producers are now gearing 
“tele shots” to coincide with release date of their new 
waxings, reports Variety, which observes TV is “develop- 
ing into the top medium for getting new platter releases 
off the ground,” citing case examples . . . First 4 docu- 
mentaries of series titled The Animal Fair, produced by 
Pathescope Productions for American Cyanamid Co.’s 
Lederle Laboratories Div., being released to TV stations 
by Movies U.S.A. Inc., N. Y. ; 27-min. films cover various 
livestock expositions, are offered free for showing as pub- 
lic service features . . . New TV farm programs: RFD 6, 
daily at 12:30 p.m. on KOIN-TV, Portland, Ore., aimed at 
Oregon & Southwest Washington farmers, conducted by 
Wm. E. Drips, onetime NBC director of farm programs; 
Farm Program Sat. on WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee, with stock- 
yards traffic chief Hig Murray as m.c. Both shows will be 
partic. . . . National Assn, of Manufacturers weekly In- 
dustry on Parade film, handled by veteran G. W. (Johnny) 
Johnstone now being carried on 182 stations on exclusive- 
in-your-market basis . . . Charlotte’s WBTV & WBT, owned 
by Jefferson Standard Life, broke ground Jan. 25 for new 
$1,000,000 home on 6-acre tract, containing 47,000 sq. ft. 
of floor space, including 40x60 and 40x40 studios with 
27-ft. ceilings . . . Students of 4 high schools and Rutgers 
U taking over complete operation of Walter Reade’s new 
WRTV, Asbury Park, N. J. (Ch. 58) for full day each as 
part of community promotion . . . KMTV, Omaha, offers 
week’s all-expense vacation in Sun Valley for 2 in slogan 
contest based on its call letters . . . KDRO-TV, Sedalia, 
Mo. (Ch. 6), due on air in Feb., switches rep to Pearson. 



FCC will come under closer surveillance of Congress 
this session as result of 2-hour Senate debate and un- 
expectedly heavy opposition vote Jan. 25 when ex-FBI 
man Robert E. Lee was confirmed as commissioner. 
Though he received comfortable margin of 58-25, opposition 
vote was biggest yet tallied against an Eisenhower nomi- 
nee. Sen. Monroney (D-Okla.), who cast sole ballot 
against Senate Commerce Committee approval (12-1) of 
nomination (Vol. 10:4), led opposition to confirmation. 
While praising Lee’s integrity and ability in other fields, 
he insisted nominee wasn’t qualified for FCC and that his 
endorsement by Sen. McCarthy and association with Texas 
oilman H. L. Hunt’s Facts Forum Foundation would create 
atmosphere of fear not only among broadcasters but among 
newspapers affiliated with TV-radio stations. Monroney 
lamented that President Eisenhower hadn’t appointed “a 
practical broadcaster” to the post. Voting for confirma- 
tion were 40 Republicans, 18 Democrats; against were 
22 Democrats, Republicans Aiken (Vt.) and Smith (Me.) 
and Independent Morse (Ore.) Minority leader Lyndon 
Johnson (Tex.), whose wife owns KTBC-TV & KTBC, 
Austin, was absent during most of debate and vote; later 
he said he would have voted for Lee nomination. 

Amendment of “protest” section of Communications 
Act was requested by FCC in letter this week to House 
Speaker Martin. Commission asks that language be 
changed so that filing of protest doesn’t automatically 
stop effectiveness of CPs. Present law. Commission said, 
makes possible “delaying tactics on the part of existing 
licensees or permittees attempting to forestall competition.” 



Metropolitan Opera opening nights go on TV again 
beginning this year — but this time it’s theatre TV. Metro- 
politan Opera Assn, and Theatre Network TV this week 
announced 3-year contract to televise annual opening 
night — the celebrities and fashions as well as the operas — 
on closed-circuit theatre hookup as benefit for Opera Assn, 
and a local charity in each city where telecast is shown. 
TNT pres. Nathan L. Halpern has set goal of 100 the- 
atres for the 1954 telecast in Nov. TNT televised Carmen 
from Metropolitan to 31 theatres in 21 cities last year, 
drawing audience of about 60,000. Theatre telecasts are 
expected to substantially cut down Met’s annual deficit. 
Officials of Opera Assn, and TNT credited cooperation of 
unions with making the plan possible. Opening nights of 
1948-50 were presented on home TV, sponsored by Texaco 
on ABC-TV, but were discontinued because of high costs. 

National Football League rewrote its TV-radio re- 
strictions this week to conform with last November’s anti- 
trust decision (Vol. 9:46) after club owners voted unani- 
mously not to appeal. Amendment to Article 10 of NFL 
constitution now specifically permits local TV-radio broad- 
casts within city where a game is being played provided 
part of broadcasting receipts are added to gross receipts 
of game. When club is away from home, any other club 
may telecast into its territory. Also added to constitution 
was new section binding each club to court decision. TV 
network representatives attended club meeting in Phila- 
delphia to start working out plans for next season. 

FCC’s “functional music” proposals for FM (Vol. 10:1) 
were endorsed by NARTB board at Phoenix meeting. 



11 



Color Trends & Briefs: Each color program is still an 
event, because there is average of only 2-3 live shows a 
week, anywhere. NBC feeds its color premieres to whole 
network, of which 20-30 stations rebroadcast them in color, 
rest in monochrome. CBS has one program weekly, 
carried only in New York and Baltimore. Only other 
stations able to originate color are: WABD, New York, 
slides & film; WPTZ, Philadelphia, slides & film; WMAR- 
TV, Baltimore, slides. Many others have origination 
equipment on order, expect it to start coming through in 
next month or two. For benefit of those who have the 
2-300 color “sets-in-use,” here are known color schedules: 

NBC-TV — Zoo Parade Jan. 31, 4:30-5; Howdy Doody 
Feb. 1-5 (daily), 5:30-6; Judge for Yourself (Fred Allen) 
Feb. 9, 10-10:30; Meet the Press Feb. 14, 6-6:30; Camel 
News Caravan Feb. 16, 7:45-8; Your Hit Parade Feb. 20, 
10:30-11; Armstrong Circle Theatre Feb. 23, 9:30-10; 
Excursion Feb. 28, 4-4:30; Ding Dong School March 8, 
10-10:30 a.m. ; Eddie Fisher March 10, 7:30-7:45; Name 
That Tune March 15, 8-8:30; On Your Account March 19, 
4:30-5. 

CBS-TV — New Revue, every Friday, 5:30-6, New 
York and Baltimore only. Paul Tripp is tentatively sched- 
uled for 5:30-6 Paid Tripp’s Party Tuesdays, starting 
March 2. 

In NBC’s schedule are many “firsts.” Beside net- 
work programs, it had first commercial local origination 
schedule for WNBT, New York, Jan. 29, with Jinx Falken- 
burg show 1:45-2:30, featuring guests Ethel Waters, 
Dennis Day and Beatrice Kraft and fashion show. 

Another milestone will be first non-closed-circuit film- 
and-live program on Feb. 16 sixth anniversary of Camel 
News Caravan. Films will be Far Eastern documentary 
shot by famed photographer twins Gene and Charles Jones, 
plus fashion shots from Florida and California. 

Zoo Parade is built around theme of “animal adapta- 
tion,” featuring, among other animals, a crow, white 
cockatoo, golden pheasant, green frogs. 

* * * * 

Beside color programs for network, NBC is conduct- 
ing closed-circuit demonstrations for various groups, such 
as Feb. 25 session for Folding Box Assn., makers of pack- 
ages, and ink manufacturers. In addition, it feeds color 
signals to WPIX, New York, which broadcasts them 
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. weekdays. CBS is still reticent about 
color plans. A third once-a-week program is to be added 
during first quarter, so as to provide a program near be- 
ginning, middle and end of each week. All will be offered 
to whole netwoi'k, though number that will take them is 
still unknown. WCBS-TV also offers color test signals 
weekdays, 6:30-7 a.m. 

Analyzing succe.ss of NBC Spot Sales’ closed-circuit 
demonstration of how to integrate color commercials into 
black-&-white schedule (Vol. 10:3), Jan. 30 Tide Maga- 
zine quotes reaction of a couple influential advertisers, not 
now heavily in TV. Wm. Gorman, controller of Gimbels, 
said: “Having seen the demonstration, I personally feel 
color TV will be a far more useful medium to stores such 
as ours than black-&-white now is.” A. F. Guckenberger, 
adv. mgr. of Ward Baking Co., commented: “Cake really 
looks like cake in color.” 

Still hope for color converters? Quote from FCC 
Comr. George Sterling’s Jan. 28 address to Boston IRE: 
“While I had thought that the point of no return had been 
passed in converting black-&-white receivers, I now have 
a notion that .some gimmick not too costly in price will be 
devised which will enable a monochrome receiver to receive 
color programs -in color. It would surely meet public ac- 
ceptance by those who cannot afford a color receiver until 
they arc available at reasonable cost.” 



Network Accounts: Million-dollar promotion campaign, 

biggest ever for any network program, is being launched 
Feb. 1 by NBC-TV for upcoming women’s-angle daily 
series. Home, which debuts March 1, weekdays 11 a.m.- 
noon(Vol. 10:4). Campaign breaks with full-page ads 
in metropolitan newspapers, will run at least until April 1, 
features on-air plugs, 1-min. promotional films, letters to 
adv. agencies, etc. Four sponsors have already been signed, 
but NBC prefers to wait until larger group has signed 
before releasing any names . . . International Minerals & 
Chemicals Corp. (Ac’cent food flavoring) buys 26 partic. 
on Garroway’s 7-9 a.m. Today on NBC-TV thru BBDO; 
Polaroid Corp. buys 60 partic., thru BBDO; Magic Chef 
(ranges) 12 partic., thru Krupnick & Assoc., St. Louis; 
Jacques Kreisler Mfg. Co. (watch bands) 11 partic., thru 
Foote, Cone & Belding . . . Borden’s drops Treasury Men 
in Action from NBC-TV, Thu. 8:30-9 p.m., effective in 
late April, when it goes to unstated time on ABC-TV . . . 
American Home Products Corp. sponsors Secret Storm on 
CBS-TV starting Feb. 1, Mon.-Wed.-Fri. 4:15-4:30 p.m., 
thru Biow . . . Quaker Oats sponsors Contest Carnival on 
CBS-TV starting Feb. 7, Sun. 12:30-1 p.m., thru Sherman 
& Marquette . . . Helene Curtis Co. (hair preparation) ex- 
pands sponsorship from alt.-w^eek to weekly of Down You 
Go on DuMont starting Feb. 5, Fri. 10:30-11 p.m., thru 
Ruthrauff & Ryan . . . Thor Corp. (appliances) drops Quick 
as a Flash on ABC-TV, effective Feb. 25, Thu. 8-8:30 p.m. 

. . . With regional sponsors, Jane Pickens Show debuts on 
ABC-TV Jan. 31, Sun. 9:15-9:30 p.m. ... Old Gold 
sponsors Truth or Consequences on NBC-TV starting May 
18, Tue. 10-10:30 p.m., as summer replacement for Fred 
Allen’s Judge for Yourself, thru Lennen & Newell. 

Army Signal Corps’ film Atrocities in Korea, barred 
from TV until Jan. 28, now being released to 261 stations. 



Colorcasting Miscellany: CBS-TV plans to convert to 
color its Studio 43 at Hollywood TV City . . . KMTV, 
Omaha, doesn’t expect to originate color until late 1955, 
but it has appointed as color consultants Eugene King- 
man, director of Joslyn Memorial Art Museum, and Ken- 
drick Wilson, director of Omaha Community Playhouse 
. . . Katz rep firm has published 39-p. Focus on Color TV, 
a status report on color covering networking, slides, 
film, local origination, tape, receivers, etc. . . . NBC’s mo- 
bile unit, back from Pasadena, is now being remodeled, 
will get a third camera before use on next remote. , . . 
DuMont reports sale of a “Colorvision” slide scanner to 
Eitel-McCullough; previous units went to Motorola & CBS. 

First RCA receiving tubes, made specially for color, 
announced this week: 6AN8, triode-pentode for low-fre- 
quency oscillator, sync-separator and phase-splitter cir- 
cuits; 6BD4, beam triode for voltage regulation of high- 
voltage, low-current DC power supplies; 3A3, half-wave 
vacuum rectifier for rectifying high-voltage pulses ; 6BY6, 
pentagrid amplifier for use as gated amplifier, also as a 
combined sync separator and sync clipper; 6AU4-GT, half- 
wave rectifier for damper-diode service in color sets and 
for monochrome sets with 90-degree deflection tubes. 

Preparing for color shipments, GE TV-radio dept, this 
week announced division of responsibility between mono- 
chrome and color for 3 functions: receiver sales, advertis- 
ing, engineering. In first appointments, Paul H. Leslie, 
ex-TV sales mgr., is named sales mgr. for monochrome sets 
and Joseph F. Effinger, ex-Cincinnati district sales mgr., 
is appointed sales mgr. for color receivers. 

Transmission of color test signals simultaneously with 
regular black-&-white or color programs would be so ii.se- 
ful, says NBC engineering v.p. O. B. Hanson, that NBC 
has been studying techniques for months. Among methods 
considered is one suggested by Telechrome Inc. (Vol. 10:4). 




TV SALES GO UP AS PROFITS CONE DOWN: TV business apparently picked up generally in 
recent weeks after sluggish start in early Jan. , giving trade much-needed boost and 
raising hopes month's sales showing at all levels won't be as bad as first feared. 

Local conditions vary , of course, but even RETMA lent statistical support to 
widespread bullish reports in disclosing distributor sales to dealers went up to 
190 , 000 week ended Jan. 22 from about 150,000 in each of 2 preceding weeks. And 
while official RETMA statistics on retail sales won't be available for a few weeks, 
reports from field point consistently to recent pickup. 

Major set makers , who set the industry pace, say their business is holding up 
well in face of normally slow post-Xmas tendency, bad weather over much of nation, 
advent of color, etc. They said they had no definitive explanation to offer. 

Motorola v.p. E.R. Taylor said his company, while not cranking up full tilt, 
had increased output considerably over last 2 weeks to meet increased demand. And 
accenting trend to low-priced merchandise , he also disclosed Motorola had discon- 
tinued production of all 24 & 27-in. sets, now makes only three types: 17 & 21-in. 
tables and 21-in. open consoles. Other manufacturers have sharply curtailed pro- 
duction of larger sizes, probably have quietly eliminated some types, too. 

Admiral's Joe Marty said sales so far were ahead of last Jan. , with sizable 
pickup last 2 weeks. RCA and Philco spokesmen said much the same thing. Philco 
confirmed reports that 700 TV-radio workers had been laid off in last 4 weeks, but 
said they were hired on temporary basis last summer when new factory was opened and 
were retained rest of 1953 as long as production remained high. 

Though volume was improving, profits weren't . Said Taylor: "Nobody's making 
money with 17-in. sets selling for $150 & $160, and 21-in. all-channel sets at $200. 
Labor hasn't gone down, components have gone down only slightly. The only thing 
that's really gone down is the profit — and that hurts I" 

♦ * ♦ * 

The few color sets got wider distribution on dealer floors this week, permit- 
ting fuller evaluation of public reaction. Differing with locale, consumers usually 
showed keen interest, liked pictures but not the $1000-plus price tags and small 
screens. The few dealers who had color set used it as traffic-builder , reporting 
they drummed up some black-&-white business as a result. Big Abraham & Straus dept, 
store in Brooklyn became perhaps first retail outlet to sell a color set . It took 
order from unidentified woman for $995 set assembled by Philharmonic, using tube 
and other components from RCA and merchandised under store's AMC label. 

Manufacturers show no inclination to sell current small-screen sets. Even 
RCA , stating it possessed only 150 sets, would not sell any — merely has them out 
on loan — and no other major manufacturer could be found with a set he would sell 
and immediately deliver. Admiral has 25-30 on loan, hasn't told of selling plans. 

When larger color screens will be marketed , is still anybody's guess. Zenith 
v.p. H.C. Bonfig, speaking this week to Chicago Federated Advertising Clubs, said 
he could not escape the feeling that current 15-in . color set is " already obsolete , 
or if not obsolete, it will be before the year is out." He added; "The industry's 
race for development of an inexpensive color picture tube makes the race-f or-obso- 
lescence factor stare right out of that tube face in 3 primary colors." 

Ht * * * 

TV production advanced to 111,188 week ended Jan. 22, up from 95,915 preced- 
ing week and 106,525 week of Jan. 8, bringing 3-week production for year to date to 
about 313,000, compared to about 520,000 for first 3 weeks of 1953. Jan. 22 week's 
radio production tota le d 215, 976, compared to 221,372 week ended Jan. 15 and 225,481 
v/eek before. It brought 3-week output to about 462,000 vs. 746,000 in 1953. 



12 - 



- 13 - 



RETMA also reported official 1955 production of 7,214,787 TVs & 13,368,556 
radios, including auto sets. TV output was second only to 1950's 7,463,800, was 
well up from 1951's 5,384,798 and 1952’s 6,096,279 (for month-by-month tabulations 
of TV sets by types, 1947-53, see p. 334, TV Factbook No. 18). Radios were up from 
1952's 10,934,872 but far from 1947's record 20,000,000. Here's monthly breakdown 
of TV and radio production for 1953: 



1953 


Production 


1953 


Radio Production by 


rypes 




Total TV 


Total Radio 


Home Sets 


Portables 


Clock 


Auto 


January 


719,234 


1,093,142 


361,921 


93,962 


189,592 


447,667 


February 


730,597 


1,192,439 


402,742 


87,711 


210,924 


491,062 


March (5 wks) 


810,112 


1,549,203 


442,101 


177,656 


275,079 


654,367 


April 


567,878 


1,158,936 


286,974 


201,476 


198,394 


483,092 


May 


481,936 


1,108,991 


278,156 


204,065 


129,391 


497,379 


June (5 wks) . 


524,479 


1,163,831 


287,724 


239,189 


131,144 


505,774 


July 


316,289 


674,459 


172,197 


78,434 


87,620 


336,208 


August 


603,760 


991,637 


299,939 


145,460 


169,301 


376,937 


Sept. (5 wks) 


770,085 


1,216,525 


529,427 


147,355 


182,417 


357,326 


October 


680,433 


1,052,493 


370,178 


135,009 


189,230 


358,076 


November 


560,197 


1,065,785 


457,151 


127,316 


171,356 


309,962 


Dec. (5 wks) . 


449,787 


1,101,115 


514,428 


103,931 


117,672 


365,084 


TOTAL 7 


,214,787 


13,368,556 


4,402,938 


1,741,564 


2,041,120 


5,182,934 



'WORLD'S FASTEST GROWING MAJOR INDUSTRY': Elec t ronic industry's Mr. Statistics had 
some fabulous figures for N.Y. Society cf Security Analysts this week. Sylvania's 
sales research director Frank Mansfield , who also heads RETMA statistical committee, 
called electronics "world's fastest growing major industry", estimated sales and 
revenue volume at about S8 billion a year at present, foresaw more than $13 billion 
annually in sales and revenue within next 8 years. 

An accurate prophet in the past , Frank Mansfield's figures are usually taken 
quite seriously by the industry. So it will sit up and take notice when he says 
that by 1960-62 color will amount to 80% of all TV set sales . Here's a summary of 
what he foresees, with some amazingly precise figures which could some day rise to 
plague him, even though he allows himself a 3-year leeway for their achievement: 

Television : Receiver sales at retail in 1953 totaled 6,600,000 units, at 

factory value of $1.1 billion. In 1957-59 , they'll average 5, 300, OOO-to-6, 900, 000, 
valued at $1.9-to-$2.5 billion, with about 46% of them in color; in 1960-62 . between 
5,400,000-S:-8,100,000 annually, valued at $1. 65-to-$2. 47 billion, about 80% of them 
in color. By end of 1955 , entire country except for "very fringe territory" will 
be covered by good TV signals, he declared, noting that half of the homes of U.S. 
are now 85% saturated, while another 36% of nation's homes have 40% TV saturation. 

Radios : About 7,000,000 home radios, at $113,000,000 factory value, were 

sold at retail in 1953, plus 5,200,000 auto sets at $150,000,000. In 1954 , about 
6,000,000 home sets valued at $100,000,000 plus 4,100,000 auto sets at $123,000,000 
will be sold. For 1957-59 , he foresaw home set sales of 7,800,000 a year at annual 
value of $126,000,000 and auto set sales of 3,600,000-5,000,000 at $108-150,000,000. 

Phonograph players : Should maintain fairly level volume of sales between 

$120,000,000 & $130,000,000 a year in next decade — though increasing popularity of 
high-fidelity systems may well increase this total considerably. (RCA v.p. Mannie 
Sacks predicted phonograph record sales of $300,000,000 a year by 1960; Vol. 10:3.) 

Tubes and components for repair : Totaled about $600,000,000 in 1953, will 

be about $850,000,000 in 1954, $1.4 billion in 1957-59 . $2.2 billion in 1960-62 . 

Defense purchases of electronics products totaled $2.8 billion in 1953, may 
go up to $2.9 billion this year , to $3.1 billio n a year in 1957-59 and $3.8 billion 
in 1960-62. He said this estimate was based on assumption of "no shooting war". 
Though Govt, will remain biggest customer of industry and bulk of production will 
continue to go for defense and entertainment, electronics equipment for industry and 



- 14 - 

commerce will make steady advances, totaling some $274,000,000 in 1954, $520,000,000 
by 1957-59 and $945,000,000 by 1960-62. 

Markups on all electronics items from factory to consumer will account for 
another $1.4 billion in 1954 , he figures, and should reach $2.5 billion in 1960-62. 

* * * * 

Lumping revenues from TV-radio broadcasting with radiotelegraph & commercial 
cables, Mansfield arrives at a total of $1.285 billion in 1953, says these should 
go up to $1.4 billion in 1954, $1.5 billion in 1957-59, $1.8 billion in 1960-62. 

RCA v.p. Dr. C.B. Jolliffe , at same meeting, said he agreed with Mansfield's 
over-all statistical forecasts, though differing on some individual items. Philco 
v.p. Courtnay Pitt predicted factory value of all electronics items sold in 1954 
would be $5.1 billion — got this total from estimated $3.5 billion for defense pur- 
chases, $1.2 billion for TVs, $300,000,000 radios, $100,000,000 industrial items. 



Trade Personals: w. a. Biees, ex-v.p. & gen. sales 

mgr. of old Crosley div. prior to reorganization last year, 
resigns as v.p. of parent Avco Mfg. Corp., returns to Los 
Angeles home, but continues with Avco as consultant . . . 
John Kelly, ex- Raytheon Distributor Inc., Chicago, named 
gen. sales mgr. of Raytheon TV-radio div., succeeding Wm. 
J. Kelt, now pres, of Appliance Distributors Inc., Indian- 
apolis Raytheon outlet . . . Ellis L. Redden resigns as 
Motorola adv. & sales promotion director; effective on 
March 1, he will be succeeded by David H. Kutner, now 
in same position at Norge div. of Borg-Warner Corp. 
. . . Kenneth C. Meinken Jr. resigns as v.p. & gen. sales 
mgr. of National Union Radio Corp. (tubes) to become 
sales mgr. of Automatic Mfg. Corp., Newark (electronic 
components); he assumes duties handled by sales v.p. Bert 
E. Smith, to whom he reports . . . Fred M. Link, ex-pres. 
and founder of old Link Radio Corp., appointed director 
of DuMont’s new mobile communications dept., super- 
vising marketing of mobile and fixed-station radio trans- 
mitter & receiver equipment; he thus renews association 
with Dr. DuMont begun when both were with old De Forest 
Radio Co. in late 1920’s . . . Thomas Ryan named Sylvania 
midwest sales mgr., Robert Burbidge west coast sales mgr. 
. . . Eugene S. Fields Jr. resigns as mid-Atlantic district 
mgr., Raytheon TV-radio div. . . . Wm. Rider, ex- Avco, 
named CBS-Columbia district mgr. in Cleveland . . . Ray- 
mond P. Weis promoted to sales promotion mgr., Strom- 
berg-Carlson sound equipment div. . . . Allen N. White Jr. 
resigns as sales promotion mgr. of Westinghouse TV-radio 
div. . . . Raul H. Frye, ex-Raytheon, appointed engineering 
v.p.. National Co., Malden, Mass.; Thomas D. Walsh pro- 
moted to v.p. & controller . . . Neil R. Seitzman appointed 
sales mgr. of Reon Resistor Corp., Yonkers, N. Y., taking 
over duties handled by pres. Leon Resnicow . . . Harold J. 
Adler, ex-Hallicrafters, appointed engineering v.p., Edwin 
I. Guthman Co., Chicago (capacitors) . . . E. Hoy Mc- 
Connell upped to Capehart-Farnsworth sales promotion 
mgr.; Philip B. Parker, ex-Landers, Frary & Clark (ap- 
pliances), named Dallas sales mgr. . . . Wm. H. Rickards, 
ex-Radiart & Cleveland Electronics, named to new post 
of director of engineering. Ward Products div. of Gabriel 
Co. (antennas) . . . Howard N. Gross named Motorola re- 
gional sales mgr. for Washington-Baltimore-Newark terri- 
tory, replacing Charles Klein, resigned . . . John Jipp, ex- 
Motorola, named instrumentation recorder sales mgr., 
Ampex Corp., Redwood City, Cal. 



Pitching for RCA account which quits J. Walter 
Thompson June 1, William H. Weintraub & Co. placed 
full-page ad in Jan. 28 New York Times, strikingly cap- 
tioned with letters RCA in Morse code and addressed to 
executives of RCA-NBC, listing top 28 by name, then fol- 
lowed this up with presentation. New adv. agency will be 
chosen in month or two. 



Distributors Notes: RCA Victor appoints Prudential 
Distributors Inc., Spokane (Bedri Saad, pres.), replacing 
Harper-Meggee Inc., now out of business . . . Hoffman 
Radio appoints Covington Distributing Co., Houston (A. B. 
Covington, pres.) . . . CBS-Columbia appoints McCormack 
& Co., ex-Hoffman Radio San Francisco outlet, replacing 
Pacific Northern Appliances . . . Philco appoints Lucken- 
bach Inc., Pottsville, Pa. (Russell W. Zacharias, pres.), 
replacing A1 Saphin Co. . . . Emerson appoints Graybar, 
Cincinnati . . . Crosley -Bendix appoints Robert L. Rice 
Co., Portland, Ore. . . . Meek TV appoints Milmar Inc., 
Cleveland . . . Tele King closes factory branches in Phila- 
delphia, Cincinnati, Hartford & Charlotte for reasons of 
economy, appoints Kingsley Stubbs Co., San Francisco, and 
F. E. Becker & Co., Portland, Ore. . . . Hoffman Radio ap- 
points Paul G. Bryant, ex-gen. mgr. of Hoffman Sales 
Corp. of Los Angeles, as gen. mgr. of Hoffman distributor 
organizations in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los 
Angeles & San Diego; he’s succeeded by Jack Herbst, ex- 
sales mgr. of Hoffman Sales Corp. of Los Angeles . . . 
Admiral Chicago factory branch appoints Wm. A. Larson 
mgr. of distribution, replacing Paul Dorsey, now gen. 
mgr. of San Francisco branch; Wm. Oppenheim appointed 
TV & appliances sales mgr., replacing Julian Rudoy, re- 
signed . . . Philco Distributors, Philadelphia, appoints 
James F. Haley TV-radio sales mgr.; Philco-Los Angeles 
appoints Milton Golden sales mgi\ of electronics div. . . . 
Raytheon Little Rock factory branch appoints Albert F. 
Bushkuhl mgr., replacing James Sprague, resigned . . . 
J. M. Oberc Inc., Highland Park, Mich. (Arvin) appoints 
Robert F. Perkins, ex-Emerson of Michigan, as sales mgr. 



Frederick D. Ogilby, v.p. & gen. mgr. of Philco TV- 
radio div., takes full charge of TV, Wm. H. Chaffee takes 
over for radio, following promotion last week of Larry F. 
Hardy, ex-pres. of TV-radio div., to be v.p. in charge of 
product development. Raymond A. Rich is promoted to 
v.p. & gen. mgr. in charge of Philco refrigeration div., suc- 
ceeding John M. Otter, now v.p. in charge of consumer 
product divs. ; Samuel N. Regenstrief, ex-v.p. of refrigera- 
tion div., named v.p. in charge of manufacturing for all 
major appliance products, including newly-acquired Dex- 
ter home laundry equipment line (Vol. 9:50). 

Westinghouse cut prices by $20 this week on 4 more 
vhf-only sets : 17-in. black plastic table, from $180 to $160 ; 
21-in. mahagony masonite table, $200 to $180 ; 21-in. open- 
face mahogany console, $300 to $280; 21-in. open-face 
frosted oak console, $320 to $300. Optional uhf tuners 
are $40 extra. Westinghouse also announced construc- 
tion had started on 150,000-sq. ft. warehouse adjoining TV- 
radio plant at Metuchen, N. J. 

General Foods Corp. has set up new post of “director 
of electronic applications,” assigning Harold H. Cauvert 
to job; he’s ex-mgr. of staff operations for sales div. 



'tim 






wHh Euctronks RiPOmS 



WYAH BUILDING 



WASHINGTON 5, 0. C. • TBJPHONE STBtUNG 3-)75S 



Special Report 
January 30, 1954 




Full Text of rCC*s 

PROPOSED SCHEDULE OF LICENSE FEES 

Charges to Be Made for Handling of Applications, Modifications, Licenses 

Of All Broadcast Stations, Safety & Special Services, Experimental Services, Equipment Type Acceptance 
& Approval, Operator Licenses, Ship Inspections, Common Carrier Services 
Notice of Proposed Rule-Making Issued Jan. 28, 1954 as FCC Public Notice No. 54-76, Mlmeo 215 
Comments Due by April 1, 1954 (see Television Digest, Vol. 10:5) 



In the Matter of » 

Establishment of Fees for the f lOggg 

Commission s Licensing and / 

Similar Activities ) 

NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE MAKING 

1. Notice is hereby given of rule making in the above 
entitled matter. 

2. Pursuant to the provisions of the Independent Offices 
Appropriation Act of 1952 (5 U.S.C., Sec. 140), set out 
in Appendix A hereto. Congress has stated that work per- 
formed by Government agencies in connection with the 
issuance of franchises, licenses, permits, certificates, reg- 
istrations and the like for any person, except those en- 
gaged in the transaction of official business of the Govern- 
ment should, to the full extent possible, be self-sustaining. 
In order to bring about the accomplishment of this ob- 
jective, Section 140 of Title 5 authorizes the head of 
each agency to prescribe by regulation such fees and 
charges as he shall determine to be fair and equitable 
“taking into consideration direct and indirect costs to the 
Government, value to the recipient, public policy or inter- 
est served, and other pertinent facts.” 

3. The enabling legislation referred to above also pro- 
vides that the fees and charges shall be as uniform as 
practicable throughout the Government and shall be sub- 
ject to such policies as the President may prescribe. In 
view of this provision, the Commission refrained from 
taking any action looking toward the establishment of a 
schedule of fees, pending consideration of the matter on 
an over-all Government basis by the Bureau of the Budget 
operating in behalf of the President. Such a study has 
now been completed, and the Bureau of the Budget has 
issued Circular No. A-25 relating to “Fees for licensing, 
registration, and related activities” which sets out, in 
some detail, uniform standards to be applied by the vari- 
ous departments and agencies of the Government in im- 
plementing the provisions of Section 140, Title 5 of the 
United States Code. 

4. The attached proposed schedule of fees for the vari- 
ous Commission licensing activities has been drafted in 
compliance with the provisions of the Budget Bureau Cir- 
cular. In order that interested parties may be advised as 
to the basis upon which the proposed schedule of fees has 
been prepared, the following information is provided: 

(a) The Commission has determined that all of its ac- 
tivities including the issuance, renewal, modification, 
transfer, or termination of any license or certificate must 
be characterized as licensing activities for which appro- 
priate fees shall be charged with the exception of the en- 
forcement activities of the Field Engineering and Moni- 
toring Bureau and, to a limited extent, in the Broadcast 
and Safety & Special Radio Services Bureaus as well, and 
with the exception of the non-certification common carrier 
regulatory activities performed by the Common Carrier 
Bureau. And, in accordance with the policy of both the 



Congress and the over-all government program, the Com- 
mission’s licensing activities for which reimbursement 
charges are to be levied include both the direct and indirect 
costs of such activities. It has been determined that dur- 
ing the Fiscal Year 1953 approximately 45% of the Com- 
rnission’s entire expenditures were in fact directly or in- 
directly related to licensing activities. This percentage of 
the Commission’s budget has been utilized as the full cost 
recovery base from which the fees set forth in the attached 
schedule have been derived. 

(b) In determining the proper groups or categories of 
licensing fees the Commission has made use of the primary 
functional divisions into which the Commission has been 
organized and has calculated separate fees for the licens- 
ing activities of each of the 4 functional bureaus as well 
as for the special licensing activities in the Office of the 
(3hief Engineer. By such a segregation it has been pos- 
sible to avoid any subsidization of one type of licensing 
activity by another. At the same time, where personnel 
of one of the Commission’s bureaus have performed serv- 
ices which are related to the licensing functions for which 
another bureau bears primary responsibility, the expendi- 
tures for such activities have, for purposes of the at- 
tached schedule, been allocated to the licensing functions 
of the latter bureau. Thus, the antenna survey and initial 
inspection activities of the Field Engineering and Monitor- 
ing Bureau, which are directly related to the licensing of 
broadcast stations, have been included in calculating the 
expenses of processing broadcast applications. Similarly, 
the expenses of such separate offices of the Commission, 
as the Office of Opinions and Review and Office of Hear- 
ing Examiners, have been allocated among the various 
functional bureaus at a ratio approximating our budget 
estimates as to the relative amount of time spent by such 
offices on the several types of licensing activities. 

(c) Within each bureau the Commission has endeavored 
to avoid any undue multiplicity of separate charge. It has 
done this both upon the belief that such general grouping 
of related and similar licensing activities will aid both 
the Commission and the affected parties in complying with 
the new provisions with a minimum amount of additional 
time and effort and because of our recognition that no 
accurate allocation of exact costs between the various sub- 
categories of the Commission’s licensing activities is pos- 
sible. Accordingly, and in conformity with the provisions 
of the Budget Bureau’s Circular, fees for different services 
within each particular bureau have been limited to a few 
broad comparable classes of actions. 

(d) In the attached schedule no direct fees are pro- 
posed with respect to the institution of rule making pro- 
ceedings; the cost of such proceedings has been considered 
as a portion of the normal costs of license processing in the 
areas covered by such rules. Moreover, no fees are pro- 
posed to be charged with respect to revocations or modifica- 
tions of station licenses or suspension of operators’ licenses 
initiated by the Commission. Finally, it is proposed to 
exempt from the category of applications for which a fee 



1 



will be charged for processing, applications having as 
their sole objective the modification of existing licenses to 
conform with the requirements of the EARC program. 
This latter exception w'as made because the Commission 
believes it would manifestly not be in the public interest 
to penalize persons ■who voluntarily cooperate with the 
Commission in carrying out the EARC program, or similar 
programs, when no fees would be assessed against those 
persons who refuse such voluntary cooperation and are 
required to modify their licenses on the basis of action 
initiated by the Commission itself. 

(e) With the exceptions indicated in the paragraph 
above it is proposed to charge a fee in connection with 
all licensing activities of the Commission. In all cases 
the fees have been calculated upon the basis of recovering 
approximately the full costs Involved in carrying out the 
particular licensing activity in question. 

5. Proposed Schedule for Broadcast Services— It is pro- 
posed to divide all applications for authorizations in the 
broadcast services into two categories. For the first of 
these categories, involving major analysis and action by 
the Commission a fee of three hundred twenty-five dollars 
($325) would be charged. For all other applications in the 
broadcast services a fee of fifty dollars ($50) would be 
charged. 

A. Major Broadcast Applications Fee $325 

(1) AM, FM, and Television Facilities — applica- 
tions for: 

(a) Construction permits for new stations 

(b) Modification of construction permits or 
modification of licenses involving any of 
the following types of action: 

i. Change in station power 

ii. Change in station frequency 

iii. Change in station location 

iv. Change in mode of operation (including 
any change in the antenna pattern or 
hours of operation) 

(c) Licenses to cover new stations or modifica- 
tions of construction permits listed under 

(b) above 

(d) Renewals of licenses 

(e) Assignment or transfer of permits or li- 
censes 

(f) Special Service Authorizations covered by 
Section 1.325 of the Commission’s Rules 

(2) International broadcast stations — applications 
for: 

(a) Construction permits for new stations 

B. Minor Broadcast Applications Fee $50 

(1) All applications relating to auxiliary broadcast 
stations (Part 4 of the Commission’s rules) 

(2) All applications with respect to international 
broadcast stations, except applications for con- 
struction permits for new stations 

(3) All applications for construction permits, or for 
modification of construction permits, or licenses 
for AM, FM, and Television stations other than 
those listed in “A” above 

(4) Applications under Section 325 (b) of the Com- 
munications Act of 1934, as amended 

6. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Safety and Special 
Radio Services — It is proposed that a fee of ten dollars 
($10) be charged for the processing of all types of appli- 
cations in these services including original applications, 
renewals, modifications, etc., with the exception of appli- 
cations in the Amateur, Disaster, and RACES Services, 
for which a charge of three dollars ($3) will be assessed. 
The three dollar charge with respect to the amateur serv- 
ice is for each application filed whether for station license, 
operator license, change of address, renewal, etc., or any 
combination thereof. The lesser fee for the processing of 
applications in the Amateur, Disaster, and RACES serv- 
ices is because the Commission believes that it would be 
contrary to the public interest, to require applicants 
therefor to pay the full amount that would be required if 



applications in such services were grouped, for purposes 
of this notice, with the other services coming within the 
jurisdiction of the Safety & Special Radio Services Bureau. 

7. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Experimental Serv- 
ices — It is proposed that a fee of twenty dollars ($20) be 
charged for the processing of all applications, both formal 
and informal, filed in this service in accordance with the 
provisions of Part 5 of the Commission’s rules. 

8. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Type Acceptance and 
Approval — It is proposed that a fee of one hundred dollars 
($100) be charged for each application for type acceptance 
of equipment; that a fee of six hundred dollars ($600) be 
charged for all applications for type approval filed in 
accordance with Part 18 of the rules, and that a fee of 
fifteen hundred dollars ($1500) be charged for the proc- 
essing of any application for type approval covered by 
Parts 3, 8, or 19 of the Commission’s rules. 

9. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Operator Licenses — 
It is proposed that a fee of three dollars ($3) be charged 
in connection with the processing of all applications for 
commercial operator licenses regardless of class, including 
original applications, applications for renewal either by 
examination or by service under waiver of Section 13.28 
of the rules, requests for duplicate licenses, endorsement 
on all outstanding licenses, and verification cards re- 
quested at any time other than upon the issuance of a 
license or a renewal thereof. It is also proposed that a 
fee of three dollars ($3) be charged for processing an 
application for a restricted radio telephone operator’s 
license. 

10. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Ship Inspections — It 
is proposed to charge a fee of thirty dollars ($30) for each 
application filed for the following type ship inspections 
even though an inspector may be required to visit a ship 
more than once before a certificate is issued : 

(a) U. S. Compulsory Ocean-going Telegraph. 

(b) U. S. Compulsory Ocean-going Telephone. 

(c) U. S. Compulsory Great Lakes Telephone. 

(d) Foreign Compulsory Ocean-going Telegraph and 
Telephone. 

(This does not change in any way the existing require- 
ment under Section 4(f)(3) of the Communications Act, 
as Amended, that the U. S. Government be reimbursed for 
extra compensation resulting from overtime services in 
connection with ship inspections.) 

11. Proposed Schedule of Fees for Common Carrier 
Services — -It is proposed to charge the following fees in the 
Common Carrier services: 

(a) Applications filed by telephone companies under 
Section 221 of the Act for acquisitions, consolidations, 
etc. — $350. 

(b) Formal applications filed by telephone companies 
under Section 214 of the Act for the construction or ex- 
tension of a line — $150. 

(c) Applications for exemptions from Commission 
jurisdiction under Title II of the Act — $150. 

(d) All other applications filed by common carriers 
under Titles II and III of the Act, except applications filed 
by carriers under Parts 7, 8, 10 and 14 of the Commission’s 
Rules and Regulations which are covered by the fees set 
forth in the schedule of fees for the Safety and Special 
Radio Services— $30. 

12. It is contemplated that this schedule be reviewed 
biennially, and adjustments made where necessary to con- 
form the fees charged to actual experience in the light of 
new or changed circumstances. 

13. Each applicaiton for which a fee is prescribed must 
be accompanied by a remittance in the full amount of the 
fee. In no case will an application be accepted for filing 
or processed prior to payment of the full amount specified. 
Applications for which no remittance is received, or for 
which an insufficient amount is received, may be returned 
to the applicant. 

14. Provision will be made for a Cashier’s Office to be 
located in the Commission’s Offices in Washington, D. C., 
for the purpose of accepting application fees presented in 



2 



person or submitted through the mail. Applications re- 
ceived in Washington will be processed through the cash- 
ier’s office and stamped with the amount received prior to 
being forwarded to the appropriate bureau or staff office 
for further handling. Such payments may be made in 
United States legal tender, Domestic or International 
Postal Money Orders, or checks payable to the Federal 
Communications Commission. All fees collected will be 
paid into the United States Treasury as miscellaneous re- 
ceipts in accordance with the provisions of Section 140 of 
Title 5 of the U. S. Code. 

15. For the convenience of applicants presenting appli- 
cations at field offices in person or by mail, arrangements 
will also be made for the acceptance of money orders and 
checks at such field offices, and in payment for such types 
of applications, as provided for in the Commission’s Rules. 

16. Receipts will not be issued for payments sent 
through the mails. The money order procedure provides 
a receipt and cancelled checks constitute a receipt for pay- 
ments made in this manner. Receipts will be furnished 
upon request only in the case of payments made in per- 
son. The sending of cash through the mails is done en- 
tirely at the risk of the sender. 

17. No refunds of fees will be made except in the case 
of payments in excess of the fee prescribed in the Com- 
mission’s Rules. 

18. No radio operator examinations will be given prior 
to filing of an application and payment of the proper fee 
at an appropriate Commission office. Such applications 
and fees will only be accepted at District and Sub-District 
offices. They will not be accepted at quarterly, semi- 
annual or annual examination points in cities other than 
those in which District and Sub-District offices are located. 

19. The proposed amendments to the rules are issued 
pursuant to Section 4(i) of the Communications Act, Sec- 
tion 140 of Title 5 of the U. S. Code, and Budget Bureau 
Circular A-25. 

20. Any interested party who is of the opinion that the 
proposed amendments should not be adopted in the form 
set forth herein and any person desiring to support this 
proposal may file with the Commission on or before April 
1, 1954, a written statement or brief setting forth his 
comments; replies to such comments may be filed within 
10 days from the last date for filing original comments. 
The Commission will consider all comments and briefs 
presented before taking final action in this matter. 

21. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1.764 
of the Commission’s rules, an original and 14 copies of all 
statements, briefs, or comments filed shall be furnished the 
Commission. 

APPENDIX A— 5 U.S.C., Sec. 140 

“It is the sense of the Congress that any work, service, 
publication, report, document, benefit, privilege, authority, 
use, franchise, license, permit, certificate, registration, or 
similar thing of value or utility performed, furnished, 
provided, granted, prepared, or issued by any Federal 
agency (including wholly owned Government corpora- 
tions as defined in the Government Corporation Control 
Act of 1945) to or for any person (including groups, asso- 
ciations, organizations, partnerships, corporations, or busi- 
nesses), except those engaged in the transaction of official 
business of the Government, shall be self-sustaining to 
the full extent possible, and the head of each Federal 
agency is authorized by regulation (which, in the case of 
agencies in the executive branch, shall be as uniform as 
practicable and subject to such policies as the President 
may prescribe) to prescribe therefor such fee, charge, or 
rice, if any, as he shall determine, in case none exists, or 
redetermine, in case of an existing one, to be fair and 
equitable taking into consideration direct and indirect 
cost to the Government, value to the recipient, public 
policy or interest served, and other pertinent facts, and 
any amount so determined or redetermined shall be col- 
lected and paid into the Treasury as miscellaneous re- 
ceipts: Provided, that nothing contained in this Title shall 
lepeal or modify existing statutes prohibiting the collec- 



tion, fixing the amount, or directing the disposition of 
any fee, charge or price; Provided further, that nothing 
contained in this title shall repeal or modify existing stat- 
utes prescribing bases for calculation of any fee, charge or 
price, but this proviso shall not restrict the redetermina- 
tion or recalculation in accordance with the prescribed 
bases of the amount of any such fee, charge or price.” 

SEPARATE VIEWS OF COMMISSIONER HENNOCK 

The Commission has today adopted a notice of pro- 
posed rule making to charge fees to applicants for licenses 
for the first time in its history. The notice lists a schedule 
of fees, classifying them for various activities, including 
a $325 fee for AM, FM and TV applications.* 

In my opinion, this proposal is of such vital importance 
that it should have a full hearing to determine whether 
fees should be charged at all, and if so, their amount and 
the method of apportioning them among the various cate- 
gories of applicants. 

The principal consideration in determining the level of 
the proposed fees appears to be the cost to the government 
of administering the services involved. The objective is 
to recover this cost. The enabling legislation (5 USC 
140) and controlling governmental policy recognize that 
the recovery of the costs to the government is but one of 
several considerations in determining the charges for ap- 
plications. The other considerations include “value to the 
recipient” and “public policy or interest served.” 

In my opinion, a hearing on this subject would help de- 
cide which of these considerations or a combination of 
them should become the touchstone in determining the 
amount of fees. 

For example, in the broadcast field, the “public policy or 
interest served” might be shown to far outweigh all other 
factors and justify no fee, or, at the most, only a nominal 
application fee to emphasize the overwhelming public in- 
terest considerations and to impress upon the applicants 
the importance of the public responsibility that goes with 
a broadcast license. 

Moreover, the value of a broadcast license and the public 
policy and interest served might require a graduated scale 
of fees rather than a uniform fee determined on the basis 
of a formula w'hich does not seem to take into account 
either the size, type or location of a station, or the rela- 
tive importance of the applications. For the fee here 
proposed would be the same for every broadcast applicant 
and for many different types of applications; an appli- 
cant for a Class IV standard broadcast station and an ap- 
plicant for a VHF television station in a large metropoli- 
tan area; a struggling FM operator seeking a change in 
location or renewal or modification of his license as well as 
a prosperous licensee of a television station. 

Similarly, in the safety and special services where a fee 
of $10 is proposed, a graduated scale of fees, ranging 
from a nominal to a substantial level, based on the type of 
service and the purpose for which radio is used, might be 
shown to be more equitable and better adapted to accom- 
plish the objective of the law and policy. 

In no event, however, do I think that this basic change 
in the Commission’s licensing policy should be adopted 
without a hearing in which all the considerations involved 
would be fully developed. 

CONCURRING STATEMENT OF COMR. BARTLEY 

Since, as set forth in the notice, we must issue a proposal 
for some system of fees, I have no alternative but to con- 
cur. I believe, however, that the Commission’s proposal 
with respect to broadcasting should give more weight to 
the criterion of relating the amount to be collected to 
value to the recipient. I believe that, spreading the fees 
over the full license period and basing such fees on the 
card rates established by the licensee, would be more in 
line with the Budget Bureau directive. 



* It should be noted tliat this substantial fee will have to be paid 
not only with the initial application hut also with requests for 
renewals of licenses and the modifications listed above, with the 
result that there may be instances of multiple payments of $325 
during one license term. 



3 



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15 



Electronics Reports: ^^’e(^ding of atomic energy and 
transistors produced a giant’s step toward realization of 
scientists’ half-century dream of converting radioactivity 
directly into electricity, as RCA demonstrated an “atomic 
battery” at chairman David Sarnoff’s New York offices 
Jan. 26. Though output of battery is miniscule — 1/5 volt, 
5 microamperes, 1 microwatt — the principle is the thing. 
As Gen. Sarnoff stated: 

“When Michael Faraday first produced an electric 
current it was with a relatively simple device — a copper 
disk rotated between the ends of a magnet. Faraday, 120 
years ago, did not visualize the future of his invention, 
yet, today, the huge power generators at Niagara and the 
Hoover Dam operate on the same basic principle of Fara- 
day’s discovery.” 

First possible uses of battery visualized by Gen. 
Sarnoff — though he didn’t attempt to predict w'hen — 
would be to power portable and pocket-size radio receivers, 
hearing aids, signal controls, etc. Beyond these, he fore- 
saw atomic batteries powering home electrical appliances, 
replacing car batteries, perhaps becoming a major source 
of electricity for all except heaviest duty purposes. 

Gen. Sarnoff estimated that 10 of units demonstrated 
could now power a small portable radio and that 1 or 2 
could run a hearing aid. 

Basic significance of development is that it forshadow's 
production of device capable of providing almost inex- 
haustible source of electricity — since it would lose only 
half of its power in 20 years of continuous use. 

Importance of RCA’s contribution is the enormous in- 
crease in efficiency — 200,000 times as great as former ef- 
forts. Previous techniques could derive only one electron 
of electricity for each radioactive particle. RCA gets 
200,000-for-l, yet this still repiesents only 1% utilization 
of radioactive energy released. RCA scientists say new 
process has theoretical limit of 10% efficiency. 

Device works by placing radioactive material, stron- 
tium-90 in this case, against transistor-like wafer of silicon; 
latter is bonded to antimony to form junction. Beta par- 
ticles from strontium bombard wafer, producing current. 

Strontium-90 is now a waste product of atomic energy 
plants such as Oak Ridge & Hanford, but it cost $25 to 
refine amount in RCA battery (50 millicuries) . RCA says 



Financial & Trade Notes: Avco Mfg. Corp. doesn’t 

break down its Crosley & Bendix manufacturing-appliance 
operations, nor does it reveal separately the gross and net 
of its highly successful Crosley Broadcasting Co. (WLW, 
WLWT, WLWC, WLWD, WLWA) — but revamping of its 
TV-appliance structure, particularly with relation to Ben- 
dix distributors, accounted largely for sharp drop in profits 
for fiscal year ended Nov. 30, 1953. Consolidated sales 
reached record $414,783,527, compared with $326,585,641 
in preceding year. Net profit went down to $3,368,598 
(34<i a share) from $11,028,927 ($1.20). Chairman- 
president Victor Emanuel reported that defense contracts 
accounted for record volume, but earnings were hit by 
strikes and certain non-recurring costs in consolidating 
home appliance divisions as well as a weakening in price 
structures necessitating year-end inventory adjustments. 

Hearing involving Don Ferraro’s 3 companies — Fidel- 
ity Tube Co., Gem Radio & Television Corp. & Jewel Radio 
Corp., all of Newark — was postponed this week to Feb. 4. 
when Ferraro was ordered to present satisfactory plan to 
pay unsecured creditors (Vol. 10:1) or be adjudged bank- 
rupt. In another Chapter XI proceeding. Transvision 
Inc., New Rochelle, N. Y., offered amended plan to pay 
unsecured creditors 30%, payable 5% in cash and balance 
in monthly installments of 1%; original offer was 100% 
payable in monthly installments of 2%. 



mass production of strontium-90 might bring price down 
to 10<f for same amount. Output of battery could be in- 
creased by making larger units or stacking small ones. 

Though device itself is about size of cigarette tip, pres- 
ence of some alpha and gamma particles requires lead 
shielding, making whole unit about half size of cigarette 
package. With purer strontium-90, it’s expected shielding 
can be eliminated. 

Hailing development. Atomic Energy Commission 
chairman Lewis L. Strauss, former RCA board member, 
noted: “If a press release of the sort that you are making 
had been issued 120 years ago at the time of Faraday’s dis- 
covery of the electric motor, it would have been received 
with considerable disbelief.” 

Said RCA consultant David Lilienthal, ex-chairman 
of AEC: “The results achieved reflect great credit on the 
scientific imagination of RCA scientists in applying RCA’s 
extensive experience with electrons and semi-conductors 
to the efficient direct conversion of atomic radiation to 
electricity.” 

Scientists credited with development at Princeton 
Labs — under way since end of World War II, with Air 
Force backing since 1951 — are Paul Rappaport, 31 (Car- 
negie Tech, ’48-’49) and Dr. Ernest G. Linder, 51 (U of 
Iowa ’25-’27 and Cornell Ph.D. ’31). 

E 

Microphone with built-in transistor pre-amplifier is 
now in production and being offered commercially by 
Remler Co. Ltd., San Francisco. It’s designed to improve 
quality of radio voice communication betw^een pilots and 
airport control towers, and Remler claims it also clarifies 
announcements to travelers in airport terminals, aboard 
planes, etc. Telephone headset with transistor pre-ampli- 
fier, coil cord and 3-circuit plug is priced at “about $95,” 
hand-held type $80. 

Midget radio receiver the size of cigarette pack is now 
being manufactured by Lehigh Valley Electronics Engi- 
neering & Mfg. Co., Allentown, Pa., for use by subscribers 
to radio paging systems, police, firemen, etc. Set has 
range of 20 mi., will run continuously for 80 hours on 
single set of miniature batteries, uses 3 subminiature 
tubes. Company says it can produce 1000 a month, selling 
at $75 apiece, or $40 each in lots of 50 or more. 



Muntz TV reports net loss of $1,457,288 for 5 months 
ended Aug. 31, 1953, after giving effect to $746,740 tax 
adjustment credit. Sales for period were $17,420,828. No 
comparison is available as company changed its fiscal year 
to end Aug. 31 instead of March 31. This was done, ac- 
cording to pres. Earl W. Muntz, to give better impression 
by reporting summer months at end of year rather than 
beginning. “We’ve always lost money in the summer, and 
last summer was worse than previous years,” he is quoted 
in Retailing Daily, which reports Muntz may not reopen 
Chicago branch, closed 2 weeks ago because union sales- 
men rejected proposed cuts in commissions. 

Cornell-Dubilier, for quarter ended Dec. 31, reports 
sales of $11,434,918, profit of $598,800 ($1.15 on 512,390 
shares), compared with $10,574,073 & $404,533 (75^ on 
465,834 shares) for same 1952 quarter. 

Packard-Bell reports fourth quarter 1953 sales of 
$6,333,923, net income of $269,575 (39i? on 688,000 shares), 
compared with $10,479,295 & $577,949 (98(? on 588,000) 
same 1052 period. 



Olympic Radio is merchandising its own standard and 
custom TV’ lines this year, buying custom cabinets from 
Shaw iclevision Corp., Brooklyn, among other suppliers. 
We erred in reporting that Olympic would handle national 
sales for Shaw’s own TV line (Vol. 10:3). 



16 



Network TY-Badio Billings 

December 1953 and January-December 1953 
(For November report see Television Digest, Vol. 10:1) 



N etwork TV' TOIE sales soared to $227,610,400 in 
1953 from $180,794,780 the preceding year as all 4 
networks achieved gains — particularly CBS-TV, which 
forged ahead of NBC-TV with all-time record of $10,381,- 
879 in billings in Dec. to reach $97,466,809 for year. NBC- 
TV billings for year were $96,658,551. ABC-TV scored 
$21,110,680, DuMont $12,374,360. CBS led NBC in 7 of 
the 12 months. 

These are the final Publishers Information Bureau 
figures for year, based on one-time network rates before 
discounts; actual dollar volume is roughly about 40% less 
than the figures given, which are generally used in the 
industry as an index to trends. 

The PIB reports show network radio down to $160,- 
516,407 in 1953 from $163,453,406 in 1952, v/ith CBS con- 
tinuing its consistent lead and actually showing an in- 
crease of nearly $3,000,000 in 1953 over 1952. Only other 
network to show increase, slightly more than $2,000,000, 
was Mutual which has no TV. The PIB figures for Dec. 
and for all 1953: 



NETW'ORK TELEVISION 







December 


December 


Jan.-Dee. 


Jan. -Dec. 






1953 


1952 


1953 


1952 


CBS 




$10,381,879 


$ 7,088,506 


$ 97,466,809 


$ 69,058,548 


NBC 




10,062,808 


7,830,806 


96,658,551 


83,242,573 


ABC 




.. 2,619,862 


1,331,588 


21,110,680 


18,353,003 


DuMont - 


1,617,058 


1,211,316 


12,374,360 


10,140,656 




Total 


.$24,681,607 


$17,462,216 


$227,610,400 


$180,794,780 






NETWORK RADIO 






CBS 




. $ 5,554,313 


$ 5,717,800 


$ 62,381,207 


$ 59,511,209 


NBC 




3,630,971 


4,370,265 


45,151,077 


47,927,115 


ABC 




.. 2,854,169 


2,856,714 


29,826,123 


35,023,033 


MBS 


- 


2,127,192t 


1,980,320 


23,158,0001 


20,992,109 




Total 


..$14,166,645t 


$14,925,099 


$160,516,4071 


• $163,453,466 




NETWORK TELEVISION— January-December 


1953 




ABC 


CBS 


DuMont 


NBC 


Total 


Jan. 


.... $ 1,604,892 


$ 7,083,619 


$ 982,794 


$ 7,604,638 


$ 17.275,943 


Feb. 


1,481,032 


6,621,629 


862,299 


6,876,029 


15,840,989 


Mar. 


... 1,728,448 


7,739,812 


1,054,857 


7,998,131 


18,521.248 


Apr. 


1,640,597 


7,770,181 


850,658 


7,513,430 


17,774,866 


May 


_ 1,813,985 


7,622,432 


903,945 


8,052,545 


18,392,907 


June 


.... 1,607,320 


7,399,078 


835,768 


7,324,315 


17,166,481 


July 


... 1,299,471 


7,422,337 


592,890 


6,903,092 


16,217,790 


Aug. 


1,244,993 


7,783,813 


742,665 


6,564,841 


16,336,312 


Sept. 


1,376,017 


8,503,620 


678,302 


7,837,467 


18,395,406 


Oct. 


2,297,862 


9,381,816 


1,462,143 


10,267,232* 


23,409,053* 


Nov. 


2,396,203 


9,756,593* 


1,790,981 


9,654,023* 


23,597,800* 


Dec. 


.... 2,619,862 


10,381,879 


1,617,058 


10,062,808 


24,681,607 


Total $21,110,680 


$97,466,809 


$12,374,360 


$96,658,551 


$227,610,400 



NETWORK RADIO— January-December 1953 





ABC 


CBS 


MBS 


NBC 


Total 


Jan. 


...$ 2,674,622 


$ 5,157,148* 


$ 1,786,134 


$ 4,260,555 


$ 13,878,459* 


Feb. 


.. 2,538,663 


4,670,833* 


1,633,075 


3,813,602 


12,661,173* 


Mar. 


. . 2,797,544 


5,527,290* 


1,995,478 


4,342,082 


14,662,394* 


Apr. 


2,637,364 


5,375,987* 


2,008,990 


4,196,009 


14,218,350* 


May 


2,593,923 


5,334.225* 


2,038,210 


4,141,070 


14,107,428* 


June 


_ 2,113,725 


5,227,026* 


1,926,865 


3,979,471 


13,247,087* 


July 


2,030,989 


4,870,463* 


1,830,467 


3,494,330 


12,226,249* 


Aug. 


.. 1,958,683 


4,791,044* 


1,738,248 


3,219,250 


11,707,225* 


Sept. 


_.. 2,156,806 


4,990,142* 


1,792,736 


3,205,675 


12,145,359* 


Oct. 


_ 2,671,103* 


5.478,455* 


2,185,598 


3,493,950* 


13,829,106* 


Nov. 


2,798,532 


5.404,281* 


2,090,007 


3,374,112* 


13,666,932* 


Dec. 


_.. 2,854,169 


5,554,313 


2,127,192t 


3,630,971 


14,166,645 


Total $29,826,123 


$62,381,207 


$23,158,000t 


$45,151,077 


$160,516,407 



♦ Revised as of Jan. 1, 1954. t Preliminary. 

Note: These figures do not represent actual revenues to the net- 
works, which do not divulge their actual net dollar Incomes. 
They're compiled by PIB on basis of one-time network rates, or 
before frequency or cash discounts. Therefore, In terms of dollars 
actually paid to networks they may be Inflated by as much as 40%. 
Figures are accepted by networks themselves, however, and by the 
Industry generally, as satisfactory Index for comparisons & trends. 



Total TV sets in U. S. went up to 26,973,000 as of 
Dec. 1. 1953, reports NBC research chief Hugh M. Beville 
Jr. This was addition of 6,534,000 since Dec. 1, 1952. In 
Nov., more than 609,000 were added. NBC-TV network 
had 137 affiliates as of Dec. 1, of which 107 were inter- 
connected, latter serving 26,057,600 sets (96.6% of total). 



U NDER MANDATE of Congress, FCC this week issued 
proposal showing how it intends to raise about $3,000,- 
000 annually from fees levied on those whom it regulates, 
to defray part of its $7,000,000-plus annual budget. Since 
proposal would treat all TV-AM-FM broadcasters equally, 
regardless of type or size, it’s certain to bring howLs 
from smaller broadcasters, perhaps undergo considerable 
modification before final adoption. Comments on the 
proposal — full text of which is included as Special Report 
herewith to all subscribers — are due April 1. Minimum 
for any applicant is $325 when he applies, plus $325 
when he gets license, plus $325 every 3 years when he 
gets license renewed. If he has to get modification of 
power, frequency, location, antenna pattern, or hours of 
operation, he would have to pay additional $325 for each 
application for such change. Largest single charge for 
any activity would be $1500 — for type approval of equip- 
ment such as transmitters or monitors. Smallest would 
be $3 — for operators and amateurs. Proposal is delib- 
erately silent on charging for existing licenses and pend- 
ing applications; Commission wants reactions first. FCC 
is first of govt, licensing agencies to make proposal, 
required by Budget Bureau. 

First Mexican border station to aim for American TV 
audience, XELD-TV, Matamoros (Ch. 7), just across 
Rio Grande from Brownsville, Tex., has been authorized to 
move to either Guadalajara or Monterrey, reports Bill- 
board's Sam Chase from Mexico City. Efforts to obtain 
confirmation were unavailing up to our press time, but 
move wouldn’t be surprising because XELD-TV, owned 
equally by Mexican TV-radio tycoons Romulo O’Farrill 
Sr. and Emilio Azearraga and directed by Monte Kleban, 
got first competition last Sept, from KGBT-TV, Harlin- 
gen, Tex. (Ch. 4), and shortly will get another competitor 
in Weslaco’s KRGV-TV (Ch. 5) — former with CBS & ABC 
service, latter NBC. It went on air during freeze, was re- 
puted to be big earner. While other border allocations have 
been made and stations authorized by Mexican Ministry 
of Communications (see pp. 117 & 225, TV Faetbook No. 
IS), only other one actually built is XETV, Tijuana (Ch. 
6), serving also San Diego area, owned by George I. 
Rivera and Mr. Azearraga. 

Three applications for TV stations were filed this week 
with FCC, 4 were dismissed, leaving 322 pending (64 uhf). 
Week’s applications: for Great Bend, Kan., Ch. 2, by 
group of local business men headed by appliance dealer 
E. C. Wedell; for San Antonio, Ch. 12, by KMAC; for 
E. St. Louis, 111., Ch. 11, by KSTM-TV, currently operat- 
ing on St. Louis Ch. 36, which resubmitted application 
following court stay order holding up hearing on Ch. 11 
unless FCC acts to hear KSTM-TV’s arguments. [For 
further details about these applications, see TV Addenda 
18-D herewith; for complete listings of all grants, new 
applications, dismissals, hearings, etc., see TV Faetbook 
No. 18 and Addenda to date.] 

Memphis’ WHBQ-TV (Ch. 13), which began operating 
last Sept. 27 as CBS outlet, was reported sold to General 
Teleradio, General Tire & Rubber subsidiary, as we 
went to press Jan. 30. Details were unavailable, but 
deal is understood to involve $600,000 cash payment 
and $1,900,000 leasehold payments to licensee Harding 
College over 10 years. With the CBS-affiliated TV out- 
let goes radio WHBQ (5-kw day, 1-kw night on 560 kc, 
MBS). Harding College, located in Searcy, Ark., was 
represented in deal by W. 0. Beaman, secy.; General Tele- 
radio, by Wm. O’Neil, pres.; with Richard C. Crisler, 
broker. Outlet will be 4th TV owned by General Tele- 
radio — others being WOR-TV, New York; WNAC-TV, 
Boston; KHJ-TV, Los Angeles. It also holds CP for 
WGTH-TV, Hartford (Ch. 18), under agreement whereby 
Hartford Times (Gannett) is to acquire 45%. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU ^WYAH BLOG. ^ 



WASHINGTONS, O.C.* TaEPHONE STERLING 3-1755 • VOL. 10: No. 6 

, . JFEB "IS^^February 6, 1954 



in this 
issue: 



FCC Likely to Finalize 'Two UHF' Rule, page I 
One CP Issued, 2 Dropped, Zone Changed, page 2 
Savannah's First, Tulsa's UHF Testing, page 3 
FCC Clicks Well in Getting TV Started, page 3 



Giveaway Shows Argued in Supreme Court, page 5 
Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 6 
Color Trends & Briefs: Ingenious New Converter, page 7 
Higher-Priced Sets Are Selling, Too, page 8 



rCC LIKELY TO FINALIZE "TWO UHF' RULE: Proposed change in multiple ownership rules , 

to permit owners of 5 vhf stations to acquire 2 lihf (Vol. 10:4), received the over- 
whelming support of industry in comments filed with FCC this week. Matter of fact, 

some urged that uhf would benefit even more if restrictions were further relaxed. 

These comments leave Sen. Johnson (D-Colo.) the sole objector, except for 
WSAY, Rochester, inveterate network-baiter. Sen. Johnson says he plans no further 
comments on proposal and stands on his original statement (Vol. 10:3). One reason 
for his objections was that he felt FCC had too few facts on which to make the pro- 
posal. Presumably, Commission now has more data to back action. 

All networks gave proposal hearty support , CBS and NBC stating flatly that 
they would acquire uhf stations if the rule-making goes through. Said CBS ; 

" Insofar as networks are concerned , it is only natural that their economic 
interests should impel them at the present time to seek vhf affiliates in markets 
having both vhf and uhf stations. On the other hand, if a network is the licensee 
of a uhf station in a combination uhf and vhf market its economic interest would 
impel it to make its own station the network outlet in that city." CBS then went on 
to urge that owners of 5 vhf be permitted 5 uhf . stating that it is "eager and will- 
ing" to operate uhf outlets. 

" If the Commission permits." NBC stated . "NBC will proceed to acquire, by 
purchase or by grant, 2 uhf stations in markets where there are presently existing 
vhf stations. NBC will expend every effort to make these stations successful through 
use of its network programs, talent, promotion, technical skill and operating know- 
how." This would undoubtedly be paralleled by other networks, NBC said. 

ABC stated it hasn't decided whether it would seek iihf stations, but it sup- 
ported proposal vigorously. "Even a handful of successful uhf stations in major 
competitive markets," it said, "would tend to eliminate the doubts that now surround 
th e uhf in the minds of the public, advertisers, broadcasters and manufacturers. If 
such doubts could be eliminated, the vicious circle of not enough stations — not 
enough listeners — not enough all-channel receivers — not enough programs — not 
enough advertisers — not enough stations, etc., would be broken." 

DuMont said there’s need for final action so that plans can be made with 
assurance. "Insofar as the proposed rule is intended to aid in the development of 
uhf stations," it said, "it is fully expected that it will have efficacy." 

Storer also supported proposal , saying it would obtain uhf station "in a 
market where its judgment indicates uhf operation ultimately can be successful." 

Individual stations commenting were KACY, Festus-St. Louis (Ch. 14) and 
WENS, Pittsburgh (Ch. 16;. Former suggested that single entity be permitted to own 
majority interest in 5 vhf or uhf stations plus minority interests in 5 iihf. WENS 
commented: "Even a relatively slight delay in the development of uhf tends to make 
its eventual development even mere difficult. Conversely, any increased impetus to 



COPYRIGHT 1054 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



- 2 - 

uhf given at this time will snowball and produce an effect far greater than could 
be achieved by any encouragement given at a later date." 

Virtually all supporters pointed out that ; (1) Seven stations comprise far 
smaller fraction of total stations nov/ than 5 did when limit of 5 was adopted. At 
one time, ABC and NBC together owned more than 10% of all stations. (2) Netv/orks 
and other large organizations have the "programs, talent, promotion, technical skill 
and operating know-how." (3) Successful uhfs in big cities , regardless by whom con- 
trolled, will increase confidence in uhf generally. (4) FCC still has authority , 
regardless of new rule, to consider applications on case-to-case basis, refuse li- 
censes when it feels monopoly may be fostered. 

With most of the commissioners apparently in favor of letting the "big boys" 
give uhf a needed hypo, with even the uhf operators supporting the proposal through 
their UHF Assn. (Vol. 10:5), there's every indication rule will go through — with 
all proponents hopeful it will be reasonably soon. As things stand now, it looks as 
though it will take month to 6 weeks to get subject on Commission's agenda. 

* !{!. * 

As predicted in these columns (Vol. 10:3), quite a few more station sale deals 
are in the making — only major one we're able to divulge yet being General Teleradio 
purchase of WHBQ-TV, Memphis (Ch. 13), as reported last v/eek (Vol. 10:5). Most of 
big deals now cooking involve vhf outlets, but it won't be surprising if a few uhf 
c hange hands too in event the multiple ownership rule is changed. Networks may elect 
to buy already-established stations in major markets, and a Miami report even has 
George Storer dickering for uhf in that area; he will soon be deep in lohf by reason 
of acquiring pioneer — and highly successful — KPTV, Portland, Ore. as part of his 
$10,000,000 Empire Coil Co. package purchase (Vol. 10:2). 

ONE CP ISSUED, 2 DROPPED, ZONE CHANGED: Tally of ne w -station grants showed net loss 
this week as FCC granted only one, cancelled 2 at request of grantees. Other actions 
included first change in allocation zone boundaries and one initial decision. 

Week's sole CP was for Tulsa , Ch. 17, granted local industrialist Arthur R. 
Olson; it came, by coincidence, just as Tulsa's first uhf station was beginning to 
test (see p. 3). An initial decision favored WEAT-TV Inc. for West Palm Beach, Fla . 
(James Meacham, pres.) after competing WV/PG had dropped out under agreement whereby 
WEAT-TV reimburses it for $6000 expenses. 

Dropping CPs were 2 uhf holders — KEYC, Cedar Rapids, la . (Ch. 20) and KSPJ, 
Alexandria, La. (Ch. 62). Since freeze, 47 CP holders have quit before building. 

FCC examiner proposed denial of Ch. 9 grant to KVOG, Ogden, Utah, which failed 
to show up for hearing after competitor KLO dropped application. 

In week's major allocation change , the Commission adopted a proposal it once 
rejected — redefining Zone I boundary to include all of West Virginia in that zone, 
permitting closer station separation minimums in the 4700-sq. mi. tip of state for- 
merly in Zone II. Move made possible the allocation of Ch. 6 to Bluefield, W.Va . . 
requested by WHIS, Bluefield. This necessitated substituting Ch. 4 for 6 in Beckley 
and rescinding last October's allocation of Ch. 4 to Fayetteville, W.Va. 

This action shouldn't precipitate flood of demands for other zone changes. 
Commission hopes and believes. It's considered special case , doesn't have "chain- 
reaction" effect on allocations. Sterling & Hennock dissented; Webster abstained. 

Bowing to court o rder . Commission allowed KSTM-TV, St. Louis (Ch. 36) into 
hearing for St. Louis' Ch. 11 (Vol. 10:3), but advised it that hearing would inquire 
into (1) KSTM-TV s legal right to be in hearing, since it already is on the air on 
another channel; (2) whether it has authority to do business in E. St. Louis, 111., 
where it seeks grant; f3) its financial ability to operate station on Ch. 11. 

Among other actions , FCC this week: (1) Finalized substitution of Ch. 72 for 
Ch. 60 in Baltimore (Vol. 9:52) and permitted grantee WITH-TV to switch to the new 
channel to get better site without violating spacing requirements. (2) Rej ected a 
petition by Puerto Rico Dept, of Education to reserve San Juan's Ch. 4 for non-com- 
mercial operation in lieu of Ch. 6. (3) Set March 5 for start of hearings for Fort 

Smith, Ark., Ch. 5; Las Vegas, Nev. , Ch. 13; Lexington, Ky. , Ch. 18. 



- 3 - 



SAVANNAH'S FIRST, TULSA'S UHF TESTING: First brand-new TV market to be opened up 
so far this year is Savannah, Ga. , where WTOC-TV (Ch. 11) began test patterns this 
week. Also due on air shortly, possibly this week end, is V»TOW-TV, Augusta, Ga . 

(Ch. 12), which would give that city its second vhf. Only other new starter to add 
to on-air list is KCEB, Tulsa, Okla . (Ch. 13) — making just 6 new stations since 
Jan. 1 and exactly 362 on the air at this writing, 126 of them uhf. 

Several more are in completion stages , including WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mic h. 

(Ch. 5), reported just about ready to test. But fact is that pace of new starters , 
to say nothing of equipment deliveries, has slowed down considerably from recent 
one-a-day — and, as noted earlier in these pages, it will be surprising indeed if 
as many as 200 more start this year as against the 231 of 1953. Latest starters ; 

KCEB, Tulsa (Ch. 23), first local competitor to Helen Alvarez's pre-freeze 
vhf KOTV (Ch. 6), began oft-delayed tests of RCA transmitter Jan. 28, has not yet 
announced commercial debut date. Owned by oil millionaire Elfred Be ck, it's housed 
in magnificent new building of own, one of the industry's showplaces, located on 
120-acre tract embracing crest of nearby 1400-ft. Lookout Mt. N. Ray Kelly , ex-KBC 
executive, is gen. mgr., returning to his hometown to take charge; John Howley, com- 
mercial mgr. ; Richard Pickard, chief engineer. Base rate is $200. Rep is Bolling. 

WTOC-TV, Savannah (Ch. 11) began test patterns Feb. 2, is slated for Feb. 14 
commercial debut with CBS affiliation. It opens up new market, nearest other service 
being Ch. 5 in Charleston, S.C., just 83 mi. up the coast. Station uses 5-kw GE 
transmitter with 430-ft. Ideco tcv/er, is controlled and managed by Wm. T. Knight Jr . , 
veteran broadcaster, with Ben B. Williams, comm.ercial mgr. ; Dwight J. Bruce, program 
mgr. ; Kyle E. Goodman, chief engineer. Base rate is $200. Rep is Katz. 

FCC CLICKS WELL IN GETTING TV STARTED: Somethi ng of a milestone was passed Feb. 1 

when FCC sent "McFarland letters" to the last of th e co m pet it ive applications filed 
since post-freeze processing of applications began July 1, 1952. Significance of 
this is that it has processed — i.e., granted, dismissed, heard or started toward 
hearing — 1200 applications since end of freeze. 

Results of this processing are impressive ; 527 grants, of which 254 went on 
the air to add to the 108 pre-freeze stations. As of today, only 320 applications 
are pending, almost all of which are tied up competitively. Incidentally, U.S. still 
has about 750 stations in prospect — counting those on air, CPs, channels sought. 

Only shadow on Commission's exemplary performanc e in getting TV going, once 
freeze was lifted, is the paucity of final decisions in strongly contested cases. 
Commission realizes this, intends to do something about it. 

Much credit for this record belongs to chairman Rosel H. H yde , career man who 
succeeded to chairmanship last April under one-year appointment. Though his tenure 
as a Republican commissioner doesn't expire until 1959, the appointment as chairman 
was for one year only, or until April 18. But he's being strongly supported for con- 
tinuance as chairman despite Eisenhower Administration's apparent predilection for 
rotating chairmanships at the independent agencies. Two of the other 3 Republican 
members, Doerfer & Lee, are relatively new at their jobs, while the veteran engineer 
Comr. George Sterling has never evinced any particular desire for the chairmanship. 

Hyde has been importuned incessantly to wander off into labyrinths of other 
projects, but he has doggedly insisted that the Commission's first order of business 
is to g et TV stations granted and buil t. Thus Commission has been tough, almost 
ruthless, in cutting red tape and changing procedures in its objective of getting 
stations built — but it has brought TV to people who should have had it 6 years ago. 

* * * t 

Where Commission is admittedly weak is in finalizing decisions. Decision- 
writing arm, the Office of Opinions & Review, has always been understaffed. Several 
of its ablest lawyers have resigned to enter private practice, and Commission has 
yet to assign to it additional experienced personnel. However, now that basic proc- 
essing is done, the matter is getting more attention. 

So far FCC has rend e red o n ly 2 true fina l dec i sions — i.e., those fought out 
in hearing to the end. They were the Ch. 7 case in Denver & Ch. 2 in Portland, Ore.- 



- 4 - 



Vancouver, Wash . All other so-called final decisions came after competition dropped 
out, leaving no tough job in choosing winner. About a half-dozen initial decisions 
await Commission action — and some have been dangling for months. 

There are always some political blandishments , of course, but as far as we 
can tell they're not particularly effective . For one thing, hearing examiners can't 
b e fired by Commission and they generally try to be judicial — though a few really 
aren't very bright. For another thing, there are 7 commissioners, all fairly inde- 
pendent, and it's a mighty tough job to "influence" a majority consistently. 

Commission gets agitated when a Senator pops off , especially if he's on the 
powerful Interstate Commerce Committee. Occasionally, it's evident that a commis- 
sioner is doing some Senator's bidding , but he seldom manages to swing a majority 
against its best judgment. When constituents complain or seek favors. Senators and 
Congressmen are usually relieved to pass the buck to FCC. However, several Con- 
gressmen are chronic pressurers and they do give FCC a lot of headaches. 



Personal Holes: Richard P. Doherty, NARTB v.p. in 
charge of employe-employer relations and one of the TV- 
radio industry’s foremost economic authorities, resigns 
March 1 to form own management consultant firm in 
Washington; his aide Charles H. Tower will carry on 
temporarily . . . J. Roger Wollenberg, FCC asst. gen. 
counsel in charge of litigation, resigned as of Feb. 5 to 
join law firm of Haley, Doty & Schellenberg . . . Earl 
Rettig, in charge of production & business affairs 
for NBC-TV network programs div., elected v.p. . . . 
David C. Adams, NBC administrative v.p., seriously ill 
in Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y. . . . Blayne 
Butcher, veteran N. Y. agency executive, named 
gen. mgr. of WITV, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. . . . Seymour 
M. Chase, ex-FCC law staff, and Edwin S. Nail, ex-clerk to 
chief judge of municipal court of District of Columbia, join 
law firm of Segal, Smith & Hennessey . . . C. R. Dods- 
worth Jr. promoted to sales director of WLWD, Dayton, 
succeeding Wm. J. Williamson, resigned . . . Wm. T. Lane, 
ex-gen. mgr. of WLTV, Atlanta (now WLWA), onetime 
gen. mgr. of WAGE, Syracuse, has opened Wm. T. Lane 
Co., adv. & public relations, Wilson Bldg., Syracuse . . . 
Herbert W. Hobler, ex-CBS-TV, son of Atherton W. 
Hobler, exec, chairman of Benton & Bowles, named gen. 
sales mgr. of Teleprompter . . . Art Sprinkle, ex-KPHO- 
TV, Phoenix, now asst. gen. mgr., KULA, Honolulu, and 
upcoming KULA-TV (Ch. 4), due on air in March . . . John 
J. Dunn appointed asst, to CBC program organizer; he’s 
replaced as chief producer of CBOT, Ottawa, by Bruce Mc- 
Pherson, ex-CBLT, Toronto . . . Paul E. Peltason, treas. & 
major stockholder, named pres. -gen. mgr. of WTVI, St. 
Louis-Belleville, 111., replacing Bernard T. Wilson, resigned 
. . . Ray A. Furr, ex-asst. to pres., elected v.p. and director 
of program development of WABT & WAPI, Birmingham; 
Maury Farrell named special events director . . . Karel 
Pearson promoted to radio program mgr. of NBC western 
div., replacing Harry Bubeck, resigned . . . Harry Folts 
resigns as gen. mgr. of WINS, New York, recently sold 
by Crosley to J. Elroy McCaw interests (Vol. 10:5); Mc- 
Caw is temporarily in charge . . . George L. Griesbauer, 
ex-Paul H. Raymer Co. & WMAL-TV, Washington, named 
sales mgr. of WTTG, Washington, succeeding Neal J. 
Edwards, now WMAL-TV gen. sales mgr. . . . Walter 
Dennis, ex-commercial mgr., named gen. mgr. of WILS- 
TV, Lansing, Mich.; Walter Braeger, ex-promotion & mer- 
chandising mgr., named production director; Charles L. 
Brady, ex-McIntosh & Inglis, Washington consulting engi- 
neers, director of technical operations . . . Steve Pozgay, 
ex-gen. mgr. of WNAM-TV, Neenah, Wis., appointed gen. 
mgr. of WTVP, Decatur, 111., succeeding Harold Cowgill 
. . . Herman Liveright, onetime ABC-TV, promoted to 
executive producer-diiector, WDSU-TV, New Orleans . . . 
Ned R. Brooke, ex-film director, named production mgr.. 



Micky Roth appointed asst, production mgr. of WSAZ-TV, 
Huntington, W. Va.; Bert Shimp named director of educa- 
tional programs . . . Edwin J. Lasko, ex-WBKZ-TV, Battle 
Creek, named program mgr. of WSJV, Elkhart, Ind. (Ch. 
52), due late this month: Lester W. Zellmer is chief engi- 
neer, and Donald R. McFall, WTRC (AM) mgr., also will 
be WSJV administrative mgr. . . . Chester T. Behrman, 
ex-program director, promoted to operations director of 
WEHT, Henderson, Ky.-Evansville, Ind., replacing Don 
P. Molony, now v.p. of new WTSK-TV, Knoxville . . . 
Raymond Brown Jr., ex-WSBA-TV, York, Pa., appointed 
sales mgr. of upcoming WTRI, Schenectady (Ch. 35) . . . 
Robt. Gardner promoted from commercial mgr. to gen. 
mgr. of KLAS-TV, Las Vegas, Nev., succeeding Fred 
Stoye, who has sold his minority interest . . . J. Allen 
Mitchell, ex-Benton & Bowdes, named group head of TV 
copy, Wm. H. Weintraub & Co. . . . Copp Collins promoted 
to MBS mgr. of public relations. . . . Rodney Chipp, Du- 
Mont Network engineering chief, leaving Feb. 18 with 
Mrs. Chipp on 5-week business trip to South America . . . 
J. Wm. Quinn, program supervisor of WBTV, Charlotte, 
named managing director of upcoming WPDV, Florence, 
S. C. (Ch. 8), due on air next summer and also owned 
by Jefferson Standard Bestg. Co.; Melvin Purvis," Flor- 
ence attorney and ex-FBI agent, will be station mgr. and 
Robt. Rierson, ex-WBT, program director . . . Edward P. 
Wegener resigns as program director of WOI-TV, Ames, 
la., for same post at upcoming educational WQED, Pitts- 
burg . . . Melvin A. Goldberg resigns as exec, director. 
Ultra High Frequency TV Assn. 



Mary Jane IMorris is new FCC secretary, succeeding 
Democrat Thomas Slowie who resigned in Dec. A vigor- 
ous party worker with many powerful Republican friends. 
Miss Morris started career in 1943 with New York law 
firm of Willkie, Owen, Otis, Farr & Gallagher, went to 
work for Republican National Committee in 1944, later 
joined Washington law firm of Hogan & Hartson, and in 
1948 moved to FCC general counsel’s office where she has 
been ever since. She’s 33, native of Midland, Mich., starts 
new job Feb. 8 at $10,000 a year. After 1952 Republican 
victory, she was ardent candidate for commissionership. 

Ted R. Gamble, ex-asst. to Secy, of Treasury in charge 
of war bond drive, who disposed of theatre interests to go 
into TV-radio and who is part owner of KLZ-TV & KLZ, 
Denver, and KOIN-TV & KOIN, Portland, Ore., elected a 
a director of Transamerica Corp. He has been a director 
of its largest subsidiary. First National Bank of Portland. 
■ 

Henry Souvaine, 59, musician, composer and radio 
producer, who was in charge of Metropolitan Opera broad- 
casts, died Jan. 27 in New York. 



- 5 - 



Staiicn Accounts: More pre-Lenten TV-radio campaigTis 
include salad promotion by combined California Cling 
Peach Advisory Board, American Dairy Assn. & Ralston 
Purina (Ry-Krisp), whose respective agencies are BBDO, 
Campbell-Mithun & Gardner Adv.; also Comet Rice Mills, 
thru Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas. Combination popcorn pre- 
mium promotion of American Popcorn Co. and Kraft (Jolly 
Time popcorn unit) has been started in newspapers in 221 
cities, plus TV-radio; respective agencies are Buchanan- 
Thomas and Needham, Louis & Brorby . . . Waffles-&- 
syrup will be promoted in combined campaign via TV-radio 
in Feb.-March campaign by Waffle Corp. of America 
(Frozen Downyflake Waffles), thru J. M. Korn & Co., Phil- 
adelphia, with General Foods (Log Cabin Syrup), thru 
Benton & Bowles . . . Toy Guidance Council plans 13 half- 
hour shows in more than 40 markets, leading up to Xmas; 
Ralph Danziger, ex-Norman D. Waters Adv., appointed 
adv. director for account, to be placed thru Friend, Reiss, 
McGlone Inc., N. Y.; Chesterfield sponsoring Giants home 
games on WPIX for 7th year, Ballantine sponsoring 
Yankees except for 3rd & 7th innings, when White Owl 
is sponsor; respective agencies are Cunningham & Walsh, 
J. Walter Thompson, Young & Rubicam . . . Schaefer Beer 
& Lucky Strike again to co-sponsor all Brooklyn Dodger 
home games on WOR-TV, Andre Baruch succeeding Red 
Barber as commentator . . . National Brewing Co. 
to sponsor Baltimore Orioles’ and Washington Senators’ 
games on WAAM, Baltimore, thru Kenyon & Eck- 
hardt. New York . . . Among other advertisers reported 
using or preparing to use TV: Globe Pharmaceutical Corp., 



Network Accounts: Program plum of the fall season, 

new weekly 30-niin. show produced and emceed by Richard 
Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein, is being readied by NBC- 
TV, reports Feb. 6 Billboard — but network won’t confirm 
or deny. Program would be original dram.atizations of 
songs written by Rodgers & Hammerstein and others. 
Also from authoritative sources, but unconfirmed by NBC- 
TV, is that Show of Shows (Sat. 9-10:30 p.m.) will go off 
air in fall because of high costs, with co-stars Sid Caesar 
and Imogene Coca each going into own new half-hour 
shows . . . No sponsors announced yet, but NBC-TV this 
week appointed Arlene Francis as editor-in-chief of its 
much-publicized Home show starting klarch 1, Mon.-thru- 
Fri. 11 a.m.-noon; assisting will be several home economics 
experts . . . GE, for sets & tubes, buys 21 partic. on Dave 
Garroway’s 7-9 a.m. Today on NBC-TV thru Maxon Inc.; 
Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Assn, of Omaha 39 
partic. thru Bozell & Jacobs Inc., Omaha; Bissell Carpet 
Sweeper Co. 11 partic. thru N. W. Ayer & Son; C. F. 
Church Co. (wall tile) 4 partic. thru Wm. B. Remington 
Inc., Springfield, Mass.; Brown & Haley Candy Co., Ta- 
coma, Wash., 1 partic. thru Honig-Cooper Co., Seattle . . . 
Economics Laboratory Inc. (Soilax compound) buys Tue. 
2:15-2:30 portion of Garry Moore Show on CBS-TV start- 
ing March 11 thru Scheideler, Beck & Werner . . . Philip 
Morris drops Philip Morris Playhouse, will substitute 
filmed Public Defevder on CBS-TV starting March 11, 
Thu. 10-10:30 p.m., thru Biow . . . Bishop Sheen’s Life Is 
Worth Living, sponsored by Admiral on DuMont Tue. 
8-8:30 p.m., now on 169 stations. 

■ 

Hollywood’s Academy Awards will be televised again 
this year, sponsored by Oldsmobile div., General Motors, 
which is paying total of $275,000 for NBC simulcast March 
25 on some 75 TV and 200 radio stations. Of this amount, 
$115,000 will go to Academy of Motion Picture Ai-ts & 
Sciences which presents awards. Agency is D. P. Brother 
& Co., Detroit. 

J. B. Woodbury becomes pres., R. J. Potts chairman of 
R. J. Potts-Calkins & Holden Inc., big Kansas City agency. 



San Francisco (Restall capsules), thru Jim Diamond Adv., 
San Francisco; Mac Arthur Products Inc., Indian Orchard, 
Mass. (Portable Poi'ter strap-on luggage wheels), thru 
Fred Gardner Co., N. Y.; Roma Wine Co. (Roma wine in 
dripless bottle), thru Foote, Cone & Belding, San Fran- 
cisco; Gorham Co., Providence, R. I. (sterling & plated 
silverware), thru Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y.; Coty Inc. 
(cosmetics), thru Franklin Bruck Adv. Corp., N. Y.; Me- 
ridian Co., Beverly Hills, Cal. (unfinished hardwood furni- 
ture), thru Beaumont & Hohrnan, Los Angeles; Colter 
Corp. (Jekyll Island shrimp), thru Geyer Adv., N. Y.; 
Economics Labs., Minneapolis (Soilax cleanser), thru 
Scheideler, Beck & Werner, N. Y. ; Morrison Milling Co., 
Fort Worth (Little Lu Lu corn meal), thru Jack T. Holmes 
& Assoc., Fort Worth; International Harvester Co. (IH 
refrigeration products), thru Leo Burnett Co., N. Y.; Alu- 
minum Import Corp. (aluminum in primary & fabricated 
forms, bauxite, chemicals), thru J. Walter Thompson Co., 
N. Y.; Safeco Insurance Co. of America, Seattle (auto in- 
surance), thru MacWilkins, Cole & Weber; M & R Mfg. 
Co., Pontiac, Mich. (Sno-Bol bathroom cleaner), thru Ewell 
& Thurber, Chicago; National Carbon Co. (Eveready bat- 
teries), thru Wm. Esty, N. Y.; Eberhard Faber Pencil Co. 
(Paint with Pencil sets), thru Hicks & Greist, N. Y.; Bet- 
ter Living TV Enterprises Inc., N. Y. (household aids), 
thru Wolf, Dorleg & W^olf, N. Y.; St. Mary’s Packing Co., 
Sidney, 0. (Duncan Hines macaroni products), thru Ralph 
W. Jones Co., Cincinnati; H. Daroff & Son Inc., Philadel- 
phia (Botany “500” Clothes), thru Alfred J. Silberstein- 
Bert Goldsmith, N. Y. 



G iveaway shows were front-page news this week 
as action flared on 2 legal fronts aimed at blocking 
at least part of the big payoff. 

Some observers felt that U. S. Supreme Court justices’ 
critical questioning of FCC asst. gen. counsel J. Roger 
Wollenberg’s case against giveaways, argued Feb. 1, was 
a dead giveaway that they would uphold lower court ruling 
which threw out Commission’s ban against certain types 
of something-for-nothing TV-radio shows — adopted nearly 
5 years ago (Vol. 5:34-39; 9:6). Wollenberg told highest 
court all programs based principally on chance are lotteries, 
that shows in which people are called on telephone at home 
represent “worst type of lottery lure,” but FCC has no 
objection to shows where studio audience gets prizes. 

Attorneys Alfred McCormack for ABC, Paul W. Wil- 
liams for NBC and Max Freund for CBS argued that give- 
aways don’t come under legal definition of a lottery. 

New York City this week cracked down on another 
type of giveaway show, when Welfare Commissioner Mc- 
Carthy ruled Colgate-Palmolive’s daily Strike It Rich 
(CBS-TV, NBC- AM) solicited funds for allegedly needy 
persons and therefore requires city license. He said — and 
newspapers played story up big— that at least 55 families 
have landed on city relief rolls after coming from all over 
country seeking show’s “easy money.” But producer Wal- 
ter Framer denied show solicits funds, said all contribu- 
tions were voluntary — and show continued as scheduled. 
Actually, Framer will be notified officially Mon., Feb. 8, 
and if he refuses to apply for license, city could take 
matter to court. 

Call them lotteries, charity, contests of skill, or just 
plain entertainment — nevertheless, TV-radio giveaways are 
big business. One of the larger giveaway agencies, Rich- 
ard S. Robbins Co., 163 Bleecker St., New York, said this 
week that it had arranged giveaways for merchandise 
worth more than $2,000,000 last year via 12 network and 
400 local TV & radio shows it services. Merchandise is 
contributed free by manufacturers in exchange for on-air 
plugs — and show packagers, networks or stations pay the 
giveaway agency. 



- 6 - 



D ULUTH-SUPEKIOR area’s 2 new vhf stations appar- 
ently are i-acing to get on air, with WDSM-TV 
(Ch. 6) reporting this week that it expects to begin 
testing with 5-kw GE transmitter by Feb. 20, using 
interim 90-ft. tower, and to go commercial March 1. 
When weather permits, construction will begin on 500-ft. 
tower to be topped by GE 5-bay superturnstile. It will 
be CBS outlet, represented by Free & Peters. KDAL-TV 
(Ch. 3), which got 5-kw RCA transmitter in Dec. and 
which will be NBC outlet, has reported March tests 
(Vol. 10:2). Its rep is Avery-Knodel. Stations will 
bring first vhf competition to WFTV (Ch. 38), on the 
air since last May. 

Only new-station shipment reported this week was 
5-kw RCA transmitter which went out Feb. 3 to WMFD- 
TV, Wilmington, N. C. (Ch. 6), due on air around March 
1. DuMont reported 25-kw amplifier shipped Feb. 1 to 
WJBF-TV, Augusta, Ga. (Ch. 6) which has been oper- 
ating since Sept. 

GE reported new order, due for shipment by end 
of month, for 12-kw transmitter and associated equip- 
ment for WGTH-TV, Hartford (Ch. 18), granted to 
subsidiary of General Tire’s General Teleradio, with 
Hartford Times holding option to acquire 45%. GE also 
reported 12-kw amplifier ordered by KCCC-TV, Sacra- 
mento (Ch. 40) to hike power of present 1-kw RCA. GE 
also noted that its 5-kw at CKOC-TV, Kitchener, Ont. 
(Ch. 13) was still on test in preparation for Feb. 20 
commercial debut. 

* ♦ ♦ ♦ 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

KSAN-TV, San Francisco (Ch. 32), has 1-kw GE 
transmitter, plans Feb. 15 tests, goes commercial April 
6, according to owner Rev. S. H. Patterson who also owns 
radio KSAN and radio KJAY, Topeka, Kan. Roger Skel- 
ton, ex-KPIX, is asst, mgr.; Ralph Sacks, sales mgr. Hour 
rate will be $500. Rep not yet chosen. 

WHA-TV, Madison, Wis. (Ch. 21, educational) has 
its 1-kw RCA transmitter, but awaits delivery of Work- 
shop Associates antenna, now has tentative mid-March 
target, reports exec, director H. B. McCarty. 



KFBB-TV, Great Falls, Mont. (Ch. 5), on Feb. 2 
began work on antenna, expects to begin testing 5-kw 
DuMont transmitter within 2 or 3 weeks, reports TV 
director LeRoy Stahl. Its owned 50.04% by Joseph P. 
Wilkins, with Fairmount Corp., Anaconda subsidiary and 
publisher of chain of state newspapers, as 30.5% stock- 
holder. Network will be CBS, base rate $150. Weed will 
be rep. 

WORD-TV, Spartanburg, S. C. (Ch. 7), which got 
STA last week authorizing interim operation from Paris 
Mt. site, 6 mi. north of Greenville, using former WFBC- 
FM tower, has ordered DuMont equipment, plans to get 
going in 3-4 months, according to pres. Walter J. Brown. 
Grantee Spartan Radiocasting Co. got CP when Bcstg. 
Co. of the South dropped out following agreement that 
Spartan would buy WSPA (5-kw on 950 kc, CBS) with 
WSPA-FM for $400,000. Spartan now has filed for 
approval of sale of its WORD (1-kw on 910 kc, NBC) & 
WDXY (FM) for $150,000 to principals of WNOK-TV, 
Columbia, S. C. (Ch. 67). Spartan expects to ask for 
new call letters, probably WSPA-TV, and will be CBS 
affiliate. Rep not yet reported. 

WDEF-TV, Chattanooga (Ch. 12), gi-anted last week, 
has RCA transmitter ordered for mid-Feb. delivery, is 
building transmitter house atop Signal Mt., 6.5 mi. N of 
city, plans April or May start, using 300-ft. Emsco tower, 
according to pres. Carter M. Parham. Rep will be Branham. 

WNET, Providence (Ch. 16), has been delayed by 
weather, now plans tests about March 1 of 1-kw RCA 
transmitter and 420-ft. Stainless tower, reports v.p.-gen. 
mgr. John R. Porterfield. It will be first local competi- 
tion for pre-freeze WJAR-TV (Ch. 10). WPRO-TV (Ch. 
12) , other grantee there, has been delayed by protest. 
WNET rep will be Raymer. 

KBID-TV, Fresno, Cal. (Ch. 53), has its 12-kw GE 
transmitter, now plans Feb. 13 start “barring extremely 
bad weather” which would stop installation of antenna 
on Bear Mt. tower shared with KMJ-TV, reports gen. 
mgr. Robert H. Wesson. It will be city’s third uhf. Hour 
rate will be $225. Rep will be Meeker. It’s first of 3 
John Poole CPs to begin — KBIC-TV, Los Angeles (Ch. 
22), being due next spring with plans still indefinite 
for KBIE-TV, Sacramento (Ch. 46). 



P ROBLEMS OF UHF stations may eventually come 
under Congressional scrutiny. Some lawmakers say 
they’ve received quite a few requests for investigations 
or legislation to “protect” uhf operators in vhf areas. 

Sen. Jo’nnson (D-Colo.) this week shot letter to FCC 
Chairman Hyde in effect asking Commission to justify 
recent grant of STA to WORD-TV, Spartanburg, S. C. 
to move antenna site to Paris Mt., 23 mi. from Green- 
ville and 25 mi. from Spartanburg (Vol. 10:4). Said the 
Senator: “It is my understanding, if that be done, 2 uhf 
stations already operating and 2 uhf stations which have 
been granted permits but are not yet on the air, may be 
forced to abandon operation. [FCC] should not put on 
technical ‘blinders’ and overlook the adverse effect this 
temporary authorization will have an the current and pro- 
posed uhf operations in the Anderson, Greenville, Spartan- 
burg and Greenwood area.” 

Indicative of the pressures now being put on law- 
makers, is this excerpt from letter to us by AM operator 
v.’ho recently gave up uhf CP because he couldn’t get net- 
work affiliation: “I think personally the ultimate answer 
is a Congressional directive to the FCC clearly authoriz- 
ing that body to regulate network affiliation arrangements 
and rates, and it can all be done simply by just requiring 
that in multi-station towns no station, vhf or uhf, can 
affiliate with more than one or two networks. I have writ- 



ten to our Congressmen and Senators to urge their con- 
sideration of such legislation. . . .” 

“TV Troubles: UHF Stations Flounder in Sea of 
Hardships,” reads headline in Feb. 4 Wall Street Journal. 
Long article describes some of uhf’s problems in “mixed” 
cities, quotes v.p. Harry Tenenbaum of WTVI, Belleville- 
St. Louis (Ch. 54) as saying that his station is now 
operating in the black. Local programming is big aid 
to conversion. Journal quotes Stewart Spencer, director 
of WCOS-TV, Columbia, S. C. (Ch. 25) : “We televised as 
talent, under one guise or another, 1500-2000 Columbians 
during our first 6 months on the air.” 

Uhf distress stories tend to detract from fact that 
large number of uhf stations are operating successfully. 
One such operation is described in forthcoming issue of 
RCA’s Bi'oadcast News. Under title “Uhf Success Story,” 
it details how Tom Gibbens’ WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge, La. 
(Ch. 28) was operating in black after less than 30 days 
on air, gives impressive list of local and network pro- 
grams, lists station’s 101 spot accounts, contains pictures 
and diagrams of studio layout, personnel, equipment, etc. 



RCA will give technical details of new 12.5-kw uhf 
transmitter (Vol. 10:4) and other telecasting equipment, 
as well as status report on color gear, at seminar for 
consulting engineers Feb. 11 in Washington’s Statler Hotel. 



- 7 - 



Color Trends & Briefs: An ingenious 24-year-old en- 
gineer without formal engineering education wanted to 
watch color, couldn’t get or afford a tri-color tube, so 
he built himself a converter which he believes can be 
marketed for $50-$100. Conceivably, it could achieve a 
brief flurry of sales before regular color sets are plentiful 
and less costly. 

Device employs old field-sequential rotating disc, and 
principle is simple. Whether public will buy it, is anyone’s 
guess. Colors are quite faithful, but brightness is ex- 
tremely low and flicker is very bad even at low brightness 
— yet it’s a color picture. 

Developer is Robert P. Benjamin, employe of Air- 
tronics Research Inc., 5522 Dorsey Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
Company is engaged primarily in development of classified 
electronic ordnance equipment. 

Converter is what FCC Comr. George E. Sterling 
hinted at in recent Boston speech (Vol. 10:5). Young 
Benjamin was high school classmate of one of Sterling’s 
daughters, is married, has two children. 

We observed converter in operation during Feb. 4 
Howdy Doody program when it was used with old 15-in. 
DuMont set. We can vouch for fidelity of colors because 
we had watched Howdy Doody the 3 previous days on 
RCA tri-color tube set. 

But the flicker-brightness problem is serious, and 
company officials recognize it — though they feel it can 
be minimized sufficiently to produce a marketable device. 
Pres. J. E. Butler and chief engineer Wm. Whelan, with 
refreshing candor, state that they regard converter solely 
as an interim device until industry picks up speed in 
producing conventional color sets. 

Here’s how converter works: A disc about 30-in. in 
diameter, with 6 color segments, is rotated at 600rpm 
in front of black-&-white tube. Incoming color signal is 
decoded into its 3 colors. The 3 color signals are then 
keyed so that only red is fed to picture tube when red 
segment of disc is in front of tube; process is repeated 
for other 2 colors. Only 60 fields per second are pro- 
duced. This gives the high flicker rate, also produces 
considerable breakup — both much more serious than in 
CBS’s old 144-field system. 

Airtronics principals claim that increasing number 
of segments in disc and judicious balancing of green can 
improve flicker-brightness pei’formance. 

Device is not new. CBS’s Dr. Peter Goldmark, de- 
veloper of the field sequential system, tells us he’s had 
one for about 6 months, finds it a valuable tool for check- 
ing performance of “Chromacoder” camera equipment be- 



cause it has no possibility of misregistration. 

“We call it our ‘flickerscope,’ ” Dr. Goldmark said, 
“and I’m afraid that flicker would kill it as a device 
for the market.” He said he’s wondered whether ama- 
teurs and hobbyists would pick up idea. 

RCA Labs’ George Brown says his engineers have 
had some fun with same thing, building one quite some 
time ago. He said they made one in a few minutes, 
didn’t have motor for it at first, so they drove disc by 
directing compressed air at periphery. He speculates 
that there may be some market for device as a novelty. 

Hazeltine research v.p. Arthur Loughren also says 
he believes the flicker problem inescapable. As for market- 
ability, he thought it conceivable someone might try to 
make a quick killing on it. He also recalled 1949-50 talk 
of cheap conversion to field-sequential color which dis- 
appeared as engineers really got down to figuring costs. 
This makes him wonder whether the $50-$100 estimate 
is realistic. 

Airtronics officials believe 16-in. is largest practical 
picture with disc. Sets with larger tubes could be con- 
verted by reducing size of raster. Circuitry with disc 
doesn’t look very complicated; Benjamin says present 10 
tubes can be reduced to 5. It’s estimated l/50th horse- 
power motor would be adequate. Set to be converted 
must be able to pass 3.6-mc subcarrier. Many sets don’t, 
but Benjamin believes most can be adjusted to do so. 
Breadboard setup was quite crude, with components ex- 
posed, old riveted disc, big clumsy electric fan motor, etc. 

Pres. Butler says his patent attorney has made search, 
finding no previous record of technique. Industry experts 
are dubious that outfit can claim originality. They also 
believe that market for device would probably vanish 
before patent is issued, even if technique is unique. 

Butler says next step awaits industry reaction. Com- 
pany is small (200 employes) , so that he doesn’t con- 
template manufacture himself, would prefer licensing 
or having others make converters for him. Converter is 
to be demonstrated at N. Y. IRE convention next month. 

Young Benjamin, himself, is one of most interesting 
aspects of whole affair. A slight, modest fellow, he’s 
almost entirely self-taught, is a whiz at such things as 
calculus. He built monochrome set in 1946 when com- 
mercial receivers were unavailable. He converted it to 
CBS color by changing circuits and holding motor-&-disc 
in front of tube. He has never seen a picture on tri-color 
tube. He became a ham, made contacts all over the world 
in matter of weeks. He’s learned how to fly. Comr. Sterling, 
also self-taught, says he’s “mighty fond of the boy.” 



Nationwide series of clinics on color set installation 
and maintenance, conducted by RCA for TV servicemen, 
will begin Feb. 15 with 2-day seminars to be held simul- 
taneously in 15 cities. They will be held in other major 
cities later. Cities with seminars Feb. 15-16: New York, 
New Haven, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Wash- 
ingfl;on, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, 
Des Moines, Denver, San Francisco, Los Angeles. 

CBS-Hytron closed one plant in Newburyport, Mass, 
this week to convert it to production of Colortron tubes. 
Pres. Charles F. Stromeyer said about 250 workers were 
furloughed, but all will be rehired when plant is reopened 
in about a month. 

End of a color era came this week with dissolution 
of National Television System Committee (NTSC) formed 
by RETMA at height of color controversy to get industry 
agreement on compatible standards acceptable to FCC. 

Monthly color production figures will be released by 
RETMA as soon as current plans for reporting data are 
arranged with all manufacturers. No date has been set 
for first report. 



Emerging from White House, where he presented 
NBC pres. Sylvester (Pat) Weaver and exec. v.p. Robert 
Sarnoff to President Eisenhower Feb. 6, RCA chairman 
David Sarnoff told newsmen they discussed color TV and 
the new atomic battery, among other things, with the 
President. 

CBS-Columbia’s first color seminar of a series for dis- 
tributor personnel will be conducted Feb. 8-12 at Long 
Island plant. 



Communications subcommittee of Senate Commerce 
Committee, named Feb. 5, is headed by Sen. Potter (R- 
Mich.) with Schoeppel (R-Kan.), Griswold (R-Neb.), 
Hunt (D-Wyo.) and Pasture (D-R. L). Subcommittee or 
full Committee is expected to hold hearings on FCC’s 
requested legislation to amend “protest” section of Com- 
munications Act so that filing protest doesn’t automatically 
halt effectiveness of CP (Vol. 10:5). Measui’e (S-2853) 
was introduced by Committee Chairman Bricker (R-0.). 
Some Senators feel it would effectively nullify entire Mc- 
Farland Act provision on protests. 



Tradt Bepart 

February 6, 1954 

HIGHER-PRICED SETS ARE SELLING, TOO: In an industry spotlighting the cheaper models , 
is there a place in today's TV market for custom-type lines which feature quality 
styling and special engineering at correspondingly higher cost? 

We put that question this week to several so-called middle-bracket set makers 
who haven't and apparently can't go along with bigger companies in bringing prices 
down as low as $160 for 17-in. and $200 for 21-in. Answers were quite affirmative. 

We found all quite pleased with current market , very optimistic about future sales 
— consequently none was disposed to get into a cat-and-dog fight v/ith those better 
equipped to produce lowest-priced sets. 

Stromberg-Carlson' s lowest sets are a 21-in. table at $230 & 21-in. console 
at $550 . Said TV-radio gen. mgr. C. J. Hunt : "We think there'll always be a market 
for quality sets . The public will always be price-conscious but there will always 
be a certain segment which will be interested more in quality than in price. Right 
now, it's a tough competitive market but v;e have no reason to believe people have 
gone completely nuts over lov;-priced sets. 

" Our January sales this year were 50% over last year . As for production, we 
are operating in the first quarter only 6% below the first quarter of 1953. We had 
planned it that way and our business so far has led me to believe we hit it right 
on the button. Full-door consoles are still selling in limited quantities. Our in- 
ventory position on all sets is good now and I believe it'll stay that way." 

Magnavox's pres. Frank Freimann stressed impracticability of trying to get 
down as low as leaders. "Every manufacturer must recognize his own niche , " he said. 
"We've built a reputation for quality and we intend to maintain it. We try to keep 
our sets within reach of the average consumer but we're not sacrificing quality." 

DuJi/lont's Dan Halpin , with a 17-in. table leader at $200, said wood quality 
was all-important. He said DuMont won't make sets in plastic or metal just to bring 
down the price. Compare wood for wood and DuMont is competitive with leaders, he 
said, citing DuMont 21-in. walnut table at $260 as against one leader's $270. 

" We think there's a market under $300, not just under $200 ," he said. "We 
find that new markets are especially strong for sets selling between $250 and $300. 

How long it will last is anybody's guess, but I believe any manufacturer will do all 
right as long as he adjusts his production and inventory with a common sense recog- 
nition of the laws of supply and demand. We've instituted a planning program which 
keeps much closer tabs on our inventories and those of the distributors and dealers 
and we're constantly revising it to make sure it's up-to-date." 

Spokesman for Raytheon , whose prices are not quite as low as majors but con- 
siderably under Stromberg-Carlson and Magnavox down the line, said it was "reason- 
able to assume we can sell TV sets without dumping them at rock-bottom prices." He 
said Raytheon was "getting about as much of the current market as we anticipated." 

That was gist of respondents who believe they can continue to sell higher- 
priced sets. But contrary view was taken by one set maker, who asked us not to iden- 
tify him. His comment; " The TV market has definitely shifted to the middle and low- 
priced brackets, and we are in that category to stay. We have priced our sets com- 
petitively with the industry leaders and we expect to keep pace with them pricewise 

in the next 6 months. At least we're going to try." 

% 

* * * 

TV business by and large continues to rebound nicely from slow Jan. start, 
though regional differences continue to exist, of course. Augmenting our findings 
(Vol. 10:5), RETMA spokesman this week said reports from all levels of trade indi- 
cated business "as good as . if not better than, a year ago." Trade entered Feb. 
with about 1,700,000 sets in all pipelines , reduction of about 150,000 since first 
of year, down from 2,300,000 peak last October. 

- 8 - 




1 



9 



Another indication of pickup was Crosley's recall of some 300 workers laid 
off last year at Cincinnati TV plant, with almost 500 workers due to be recalled by 
mid-Feb. to meet increased production schedules. Leonard F. Cramer, v.p.-gen. mgr., 
said current output rate is 12% over first quarter year ago and 18% over the final 
quarter of 1953. Philco spokesman indicated that many of the 700 workers furloughed 
recently (Vol. 10:5) may be recalled shortly. 

But GE was one company having TV troubles . It cited impact of colo r public- 
ity on trade as one reason why 2150 workers at Syracuse & Auburn, N.Y. were laid off 
for this week only. Another factor was retooling for new models . 

**■*=!: 

TV production totaled 110,156 week ended Jan. 29, compared to 111,188 the 
preceding week and 95,915 week ended Jan. 15. It brought Jan. production to about 
420,000, compared to 719,234 Jan. 1953. Radio output totaled 202,837 Jan. 29 week, 
compared to 215,976 Jan. 22 and 221,372 week before, bringing Jan. production to 
approximately 863,000 vs. 1,093,142 year ago. 



Trade Personals: Dr. Peter C. Goldmark, prime de- 

veloper of CBS field-sequential color system and long- 
playing “Microgroove” records, promoted from v.p. to 
pres, of CBS Laboratories . . . W. F. Hoeppner promoted 
from Capehart-Farnsworth controller to asst, to pres. 
Fred D. Wilson; treas. Paul H. Hartmann takes on Hoepp- 
ner’s duties . . . Jack Krieger resigns as exec. v.p. of Star- 
rett, his duties assumed by office mgr. Wm. Jacobson . . . 
Albert Lederman promoted to head new mechanized cir- 
cuits dept, of Sylvania parts div., Long Island, N. Y. . . . 
Robert W. Conner promoted to mgr. of new installation 
& customer service section of RCA broadcast marketing 
div., taking over field installation, service & warranty 
problems formerly handled by broadcast commercial op- 
erations section . . . Henry A. Browe, ex-Admiral, named 
Sylvania Chicago district sales mgr., replacing Tom Ryan, 
now midwest regional mgr. . . . Bert Rice, ex-CBS-Colum- 
bia Distributors, N. Y., named mid-Atlantic district mgr. 
for parent company; A. Phil Stone, ex-Philco, named dis- 
trict mgr. out of Denver . . . Richard W. Strauss promoted 
to controller of Stewart- Warner Electric; Roy E. Duvall 
named asst, controller . . . Varley P. Young has resigned 
as Avco director of public relations, Cincinnati . . . Robert 
Tauber promoted to chief of Kaye-Halbert electronics sec- 
tion, succeeding Fred Miller, resigned . . . Joseph Resnick, 
29-year-old Channel Master chairman, subject of 4-page 
article in Feb. Popular Science Monthly, crediting him 
with building $12,000,000 antenna business in 6 years . . . 
John D. Schuman promoted to adv. director of Borg- 
Warner’s Norge div., replacing David Kutner, who be- 
comes Motorola adv. director March 1, succeeding Ellis 
Redden, resigned . . . Merle Cain, ex-Hallicrafters, joins 
V-M Corp., Benton Harbor, Mich., as distributor sales 
mgr. . . . V/m. A. Ready, ex-pres. of National Co., elected 
to board of Browning Labs . . . .T. A. Zuvich, ex-National 
Electronic Research Corp., named sales mgr. of Reon Tube 
Corp., Yonkers, N. Y. . . . Robert A. Hoagland named sales 
mgr. of new Aerovox-New Bedford div. . . . M. Robert 
Wilson, ex-Hallicrafters sales v.p., joins C. Robt. Stelten- 
kamp, ex-pres. of Chicago Sales Engineering Co., to form 
Steltenkamp, Wilson & Assoc., management consultants, 
1 No. LaGrange Rd.. LaGrange, 111. . . . Harold O. Wood, 
since 1951 in charge of Philco TV receiver design, ap- 
pointed chief engineer of TV div.; Wilson P. Boothroyd 
promoted to chief engineer of Philco advance development 
lab . . . W. ('. Lederer promoted to Bendix sales promotion 
mgr., working with Herman S. Sacks, adv. mgr. . . . ('apt. 
John N. Boland, USN ret., appointed Raytheon Washing- 
ton mgr. 

■ 

Ernest Beyer, .54, Olympic Radio & TV export mgr., 
died Jan. .'!! while in Santiago, Chile, on business. 



Distributor Notes: Emerson sets up factory branch 
to replace Ernerson-New York Inc. in move which pres. 
Benjamin Abrams says will result in more economical op- 
eration in highly competitive N. Y. market. Emerson- 
New York was owned by members of Abrams family (Lou 
Abrams, pres.) and they will be transferred to key posi- 
tions in factory branch, which will be known as N. Y. 
div. of Jefferson-Travis Inc. Latter is Emerson cabinet 
manufacturing subsidiary. Emerson also acquired 50% 
interest in Emerson-New England, Boston, remainder held 
by pres. Morris Rosenfeld . . . Admiral establishes factory 
branch at 2205 McKinley Ave., Houston, managed by 
Michael J. Nicolin, ex-gen. mgr. of San Diego branch . . . 
Pacific Mercury establishes factory branch for San Fran- 
cisco & Fresno, replacing N. C. Teakle Co. . . . Bendix 
Radio appoints Standard Electric Supply Co., Milwaukee 
(Leonard H. Siegel, v.p.) . . . Sentinel appoints James 
Kerwin Co., ex-Raytheon Los Angeles outlet, replacing 
Sentinel factory branch . . . DuMont appoints Charles H. 
Coombe, ex-Motorola eastern regional sales mgr., as gen. 
mgr. of factory branches in Miami, Tampa & Jacksonville; 
G. M. Nutter Inc., Cleveland (DuMont) elects H. F. 
Kloava, ex-asst. mgr., as pres., succeeding late founder 
G. M. Nutter . . . Canadian Admiral appoints Edwin Whit- 
taker supervisor of distributor branches in Toronto, Wind- 
sor, Montreal, Vancouver, London & Sudbury . . . Olympic 
Radio names Jack Haizen, Chicago factory branch mgr., as 
pres, of subsidiary Olympic Appliances Inc., N. Y.; Morton 
Schwartz named pres, of Olympic of Chicago Inc. . . . 
Covington Distributing Co., Houston (Hoffman Radio) ap- 
points Charles S. Ely v.p.-gen mgr. . . . Robert L. Rice Co., 
Portland, Ore. (Crosley-Bendix) appoints Ralph Sachs TV- 
radio sales mgr. . . . Emerson-New Jersey Inc. promotes 
Murray Golden from gen. mgr. to v.p. . . . Ray Thomas Co., 
Los Angeles (CBS-Columbia) appoints John Lyons TV 
sales mgr., replacing Wm. Tiner, now field sales mgi-. . . . 
Leo J. Meyberg Co., San Francisco (RCA Victor) an- 
nounces resignation of gen. mgr. Richard Sanford, who 
becomes merchandise mgr. of Hale’s, northern California 
dept, store chain. 

gg 

Shakeup at ('BS-Hytron boosted Charles F. Stromeyei- 
to presidency this week after only 2 weeks as exec. v.p. He 
succeeds Bruce A. Coffin, founder & pres, of company 
since formation in 1921 as llytron Radio & Electronics 
Corp. At same time, retirement of Lloyd Coffin as treas. 
was also announced. The brothers Coffin will retain their 
membei’ship on hoard and stockholdings in parent CBS, 
in which Lloyd holds 10,090 shares of Class A common & 
16,000 B, Bruce 10,880 Class A & 17,060 B. They obtained 
their stock in 1951 with acciuisition of llytron by CBS. 



10 - 



Topics & Trends oi TV Trade: Curious parallel be- 
tween TV' and automobile production, which have fol- 
lowed strikingly similar curves in past (Vols. 8:45; 9:9, 45), 
bobs up again in comparison of 1953 output of each in- 
dustry. Official TV production was placed by RETMA last 
w'eek at 7,214,787 sets; 1953 auto-truck output was 7,328,- 
040 units, according to Automobile Manufacturers Assn. 
Consider these other similarities: 

Both industries had retail sales of approximately 6,- 
500,000 units; both production totals were second high- 
est on record for each industry; both set their records in 
1950 (7,463,800 TVs, 8,003,056 autos) ; both suffered 

through periods of high inventories last year; both expect 
lower production this year (TV predictions range from 
5-6,000,000, autos from 6-7,000,000). 

Comparisons with 1951 and 1952 aren’t quite fair to 
automobile industry, whose production was limited by govt, 
mandate for those years and part of 1950 in effort to 
channel scarce supplies into defense production. Never- 
theless, both industries kept pace for first 9 months of 
1952, with TVs at 3,670,591, autos at 3,879,734. TV in- 
dustry pulled away in last 3 months, totaling 6,096,279 for 
year, as against 4,336,477 auto-truck units. Auto industry 
quota for 1952 was 4,500,000. 

Dlonth-by-month comparison of output last year points 
up even sharper parallel. TV production rose steadily first 
3 months of year; auto output rose through April. Both 
fell off in May, both picked up in June. Both maintained 
almost equal pace for rest of year, though differing curves. 
Here’s month-by-month comparison: 





TV 


Auto 


January 


719,234 


565,172 


February 


. 730,597 


583,001 


March 


. 810,112 


700,685 


April - 


. 567,878 


723,532 


May 


481,936 


643,487 


June 


. 524,479 


661,992 


July - — - 


316,289 


705,132 


August - 


603,760 


615,382 


September 


_ 770,085 


573,688 


October 


680,433 


620,562 


November 


560,197 


452,487 


December 


449,787 


482,920 


Totals 


7,214,787 


7,328,040 



Standard parts tag for use on all components returned 
to manufacturer for replacement under set warranty was 
approved this week by RETMA at request of TV-radio 
service technicians. Standardized tag includes all in- 
formation participating manufacturers feel is necessary 
to replace parts promptly and eliminates need for tech- 
nicians to carry tags from each manufacturer. 

N.\RDA Blue Book on major appliances trade-ins will 
be available March 1 from NARDA office in Merchandise 
Mart, Chicago. One copy is free to NARDA members; 
extra copies are $3.50 each or $2.50 each for 3 copies, $2 
for 5 or more. Non-members may order directly from 
publisher. National Appliance Trade-In Guide Co., Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Zenith Radio will introduce new TV & radio models 
at distributors meeting in Chicago’s Drake Hotel, Feb. 11. 
It introduced no new sets at recent Chicago Furniture 
Mart but lowered price of 21-in. mahogany table from $250 
to $200, and 17-in. mahogany console from $270 to $250. 

As Feb. promotion only, Hoffman Radio cut retail 
price of 21-in. full-door mahogany console (Model 718) 
from $380 to $300, blonde version $390 to $300. It’s part 
of month-long birthday celebration. 

Raytheon adds 2 models to 1964 line: Shelby, 21-in. 
maroon leatherette table at $200, and Wilshire, 21-in. open- 
face mahogany console at $300, blonde $320. Optional uhf 
tuner is $40 extra. 



Record industry went topsy-turvy this week with 
series of headline-producing price slashes on classical 
records that even had trade press predicting king-sized 
price war would follow. Columbia Records touched it off 
with a “one-and-a-half” sale for Feb. only, in which 12-in. 
long-playing classical record normally selling at $5.95 
would be sold for $4.46 if 2 were purchased. RCA Victor, 
which rivals Columbia for top place in the record indus- 
try, immediately reduced all classical records straight 
one-third, cutting 12-in. from $5.72 to $3.99 and 10-in. 
from $4.67 to $3.25. Mercury Records and Westminister 
Records then proposed deals similar to Columbia’s. Capi- 
tal Records said it was holding price line at present but 
might have to reconsider. Decca and M-G-M Records 
said they had no plans to cut. Gonsumers were reported 
eager to snap up records but dealers, who had loaded up 
at old price, weren’t as enthused. Classical records ac- 
counted for about $60,000,000 at retail last year, or 
roughly 25% of all record sales. 

TV set sales by Canadian factories totaled 365,400 last 
year, at average price of $406, compared to production of 
422,951, reports Canadian RTMA. They compared with 
1952 sales of 137,236, at average price of $442, production 
of 146,373. Quebec led with 120,176 sets sold; Toronto 
second, 101,193; Hamilton-Niagara, 42,178; Ottawa & 
eastern Ontario, 34,514; other Ontario, 23,334; Windsor, 
22,711; British Columbia, 19,097; Prairies, 1319; Maritime 
Provinces, 878. For Dec. alone, sales were 51,767, in- 
ventory 63,905 at month’s end. Projected production esti- 
mate is that 139,624 sets will be turned out first 3 months 
of 1954. Vincent Barreca, pres, of Canadian Admiral 
Corp., recently predicted more than 500,000 sets, valued at 
$200,000,000, would be sold in all of 1954, thanks to new 
stations and new markets opening up. 

* * * * 

Dividends: P. R. Mallory, 504 payable March 10 to 
stockholders of record Feb. 18; Westinghouse, 504 March 
4 to holders Feb. 8; Stewart-Warner, 354 extra and 404 
regular quarterly March 6 to holders Feb. 12; Aircraft 
Radio, 104 Feb. 15 to holders Feb. 5; Standard Coil Prod- 
ucts, 254 Feb. 14 to holders Feb. 5; Weston Electrical In- 
strument, 254 March 10 to holders Feb. 26; Magnavox, 
37 4 March 15 to holders Feb. 25; American Phenolic, 

254 Jan. 29 to holders Jan. 15; Zenith. 504 March 31 to 
holder’s March 10; Erie Resistor, 204 March 15 to holders 
March 6; Tung-Sol, 254 March 2 to holders Feh. 15; Inter- 
national Resistance, 54 March 5 to holders Feb. 15; 
Standard Radio Ltd. “A”, 204 April 9 to holders March 19. 

Hoffman Radio enjoyed biggest sales year in its 12- 
year history during 1953, totaling more than $50,000,000 
as against $34,769,201 in 1952, reports pres. H. Leslie 
Hoffman. He said he expected further gain in 1954 
due to new TV-radio-phono plant in Kansas City and 
larger share of markets being gained in Southwest, Mid- 
west & East. Net profits for first 3 quarters of 1953 
were $1,115,533 ($1.94 per share) compared with $994,282 
($1.73) in same 1952 months. Final 1953 figures have 
not yet been compiled. 

Television-Electronics Fund Inc. reports net assets of 
$28,835,374 ($13.58 per share on 2,124,072 shares outstand- 
ing) as of Dec. 31, 1953 vs. $24,786,839 ($14.37 on 1,725,- 
440 shares) one year earlier. 



George F. Hessler, 64, sales v.p. of Graybar and 1952- 
53 pi-es. of National Assn, of Electrical Distributors, died 
suddenly Feb. 1 at Venice, Fla. 

W. W. King, 48, as.st. to Westinghouse v.p. in charge 
of consumer products, died in Pittsburgh Jan. 20 after a 
heart attack. 



11 - 



EleCironicS Reports: RCA’s recent demonstration of 
“atomic battery” (Vol. 10:5) has sparked several rival 
claims of earlier development of similar devices. In 
r-esponse, RCA spokesman reiterates point made at dem- 
onstration — that RCA contribution isn’t simply that it 
managed to derive electricity from radioactive materials 
but that its technique is 200,000 times as efficient as pre- 
viously known methods. 

Ohmart Corp., Cincinnati, is one organization chal- 
lenging RCA’s claims, stating that since 1951 it has 
been marketing devices producing electricity from radio- 
activity. RCA official says that Ohmart device is a 
“one-for-one” unit — producing one electron of electricity 
for each radioactive electron — whereas RCA’s unit pro- 
duces 200,000 for one. Another organization making re- 
lated devices is Radiation Research Corp., West Palm 
Beach, Fla., marketing them for radiation detection in- 
struments. 

« * # ♦ 

TV set using “Tinkertoy” construction has been built 
by Sanders Associates Inc., Nashua, N. H., to show manu- 
facturers how automatic production techniques can be 
adapted to production of commercial products. Project 
Tinkertoy was developed jointly by Navy, Bureau of 
Standards and several private firms to produce electronic 
assemblies automatically (Vol. 9:38). Based on “modular” 
design, system employs series of small wafers as building- 
blocks for subassemblies. Sanders’ TV set uses 13 
modular units (sets of wafers) on 3 plug-in printed 
circuit chassis, eliminates almost 600 hand-soldering op- 
erations. Specifications for tools required to set up pilot 
runs of Tinkertoy are available at Office of Technical 
Services, Commerce Dept. (Report PB 111277). 

Silicon transistors have been made by Raytheon and 
tested at temperatures up to 350°. Company announced 
that its research div., working on Defense Dept, contract, 
tested silicon junction transistors at temperatures higher 
than the failing point for germanium transistors, but 
emphasized that silicon transistors are still long way 
from actual production. Philco last month announced 
development of silicon transistor using “surface-barrier” 
technique (Vol. 10:3). 

“Manufacturers Radio Service,” sought by NAM’s 
Committee on Manufacturers Radio Use (Vol. 9:47,50), 
was turned down by FCC this week. It said proposal, 
which would use 460-462 & 468-470 me, now assigned to 
Citizens Radio Service, is “premature” and request for 
such service should be part of a future reallocations 
proceeding. 

Western Electric has licensed 40 U.S. firms to manu- 
facture transistors. Bell Telephone’s Albei't Barnes told 
Philadelphia’s Poor Richard Club this week. He added 
that Bell nov; is producing 40 different types of transistors. 

Lewyf Corp. being reorganized into 2 companies: 
Lewyt Mfg. Corp., to manufacture electronic and precision 
mechanical equipment on contract basis for Govt, and 
industry; Lewyt Corp., to manufacture and market vacuum 
cleaners. 

Waldom Electronics Inc., Chicago, enters TV equip- 
ment field with distribution amplifier to couple 2 sets 
to one antenna and serve as booster for both, at $39.50 list. 

B 

Greatest off-year use of TV is planned by Republican 
Party for this year’s Congressional election campaign, 
and included in $3,800,000 budget approved by GOP Na- 
tional Committee P'eb. 6 in Washington. Committee didn’t 
break down figure to show amounts to be appropriated to 
TV & radio. 



Minor league baseball is in bad shape — and it’s TV- 
radio’s fault. So minor league czar Geoi’ge Trautman told 
special joint meeting of both major leagues this week in 
New York. “In 5 years since 1949 there has been a com- 
bined drop in attendance, major and minor, of 26,000,000,” 
he said. “The total number of leagues during that period 
has dropped from 59 to 37 [and] there is now no baseball 
in 172 cities and towns which had it 5 years ago.” He put 
principal blame on broadcasts and telecasts of major league 
games, which he said not only cut into attendance at minor 
league games but have virtually wiped out revenues the 
minors formerly got from radio broadcasts of their games. 
Commenting editorially on Trautman’s plea for more TV 
controls, Scripps-Howard newspapers said Feb. 1: “It is, 
we agree, a deplorable situation. But, even as ardent base- 
ball fans, we can offer Mr. Trautman no sage advice. 
Probably nothing can be done either about cycling, canals, 
silent movies, nickel beer, wood-burning locomotives, peg- 
leg trousers, gas lights, stereopticons, derby hats or side 
whiskers.” 

Strict limits on televising or broadcasting of its hear- 
ings were imposed by House Govt. Operations Committee 
Feb. 4 in 18-2 vote. Decision apparently wasn’t intended 
as slap at TV-radio but at Chairman Hoffman (R-Mich.), 
who has been accused of trying to “create a circus” of 
committee hearings and of “wiring the room” for record- 
ings so he could use members’ own remarks against them 
politically. Rule was recommended by subcommittee 
headed by Rep. Bender (R-0.), requii’es unanimous consent 
of all subcommittee members to televise, broadcast, film 
or record anj'^ subcommittee meeting, and approval of ma- 
jority of 30-man committee for televising or broadcasting 
full committee sessions. Voting against rule were Reps. 
Hoffman and Header (R-Mich.). Meanwhile, Ohio Supreme 
Court unanimously adopted “rule of judicial ethics” bar- 
ring photographing, broadcasting or televising of proceed- 
ings of any state court. 

Attorney General Brownell soft-pedaled much-head- 
lined reports of “anti-trust investigation” of ad agency 
pi'actices, particularly standard contract forms and 15% 
agency discount fees, telling news conference Feb. 4 that 
study was preliminary only and “does not mean any action 
will follow.” He added it was one of a series of studies 
conducted periodically by Justice Dept, to enforce anti- 
trust laws. He said ad study stemmed from anti-trust 
investigation several years ago of uniform commission 
rates charged by some real estate brokers. It was dropped 
when no violations were uncovered. FBI agents checked 
files of NARTB, AAAA and leading agencies this week, 
NARTB chief attorney Vincent Wasilewski saying he was 
certain his organization had violated no laws but willingly 
turning his files over. Heading study is Asst. Attorney 
General Stanley Barnes. 

Educational TV proponents were heartened this week 
by N. Y. Gov. Dewey’s message to legislature proposing 
state’s 10 non-commercial stations be operated by “re- 
sponsible” non-profit groups under general supervision 
of State Board of Regents. Latter group, at odds po- 
litically with Dewey, immediately replied it still favored 
state-financed network which was rejected last year by 
N. Y. State Temporary Commission on Educational TV 
(Vol. 9:9-10) but said they would go along with Dewey’s 
proposal in effort to get educational TV going. Non-profit 
groups have already beeJi organized in New York, Buffalo 
and Aibany-Schenectady-Troy. Joint Committee on Edu- 
cational TV congratulated Dewey and asked permission 
to circulate copies of his message to educational groups 
around the country. 



12 - 



Tel6Casiin9 Noiast National TV spot users jumped 
from 1346 in 4th quarter 1952 to 2153 in 4th quarter 1953 
when they used 44,559 schedules on 195 stations (average, 
71.5 per station) , according to latest quarterly Rorabaugh 
Report on Spot TV Advertising which details how, when, 
where and to \vhat extent all national & regional adver- 
tisers used medium during the quarter. With 360-odd sta- 
tions now on air, Rorabaugh states that 32 more have 
already signed up to start reporting their accounts, which 
are listed by stations, beginning this quarter . . . New 
“Videotown,” reportedly in Ohio, has been chosen by Cun- 
ingham & Walsh, which has decided that TV in New 
Brunswick, N. J. has stabilized so that the town no longer 
serves to depict TV growth . . . Daytime viewing rose 9% 
between April-Dee. 1953, reports Advertest, some 60% of 
those sampled in N. Y. metropolitan area survey stating 
they w^ere regular daytime viewers, some 25% saying 
they’d watch more if shows were better; most popular 
hours are 10-11 a.m., 3-5 p.m. . . . More rate increases: 
KABC-TV, Los Angeles, raises Class A hour from $1200 
to $1500, one-min. from $220 to $275, adds new Class AA 
one-min. rate of $350 for 8-10 p.m. segments daily; 
WOKY-TV, Milwaukee, Class A from $300 to $400, one- 
min. $60 to $70 . . . Lowered rates: WILS-TV, Lansing, 
cuts base hour rate from $200 to $150; WJHP-TV, Jack- 
sonville, lowers one-min. from $40 to $30 . . . Dorothy Dix 
material and name rights for TV-radio acquired from 
Bell Syndicate by Roland Israel, Philadelphia adman, who 
plans to syndicate film Dear Dorothy Dix thru Helen 
Greer-Israel Enterprises Inc. . . . Ziv acquires TV-radio 
rights to Mr. District Attorney for $250,000 from Phillips 
Lord; David Brian to play title role in new series being 
filmed in Hollywood . . . ABC-TV Manual No. 3, covering- 
charges for facilities, personnel and production services 
for network programs from its 5 originating centers, re- 
leased this week . . . Success of K-2 mountain-climbing 
expedition film underwritten by NBC-TV has led network 
to negotiate similar exclusive deal with Lowell Thomas 
Jr. covering expedition into Australia . . . WCBS-TV this 
week end completes moving of offices into Look Bldg., 
across street at 488 Madison Ave., adjacent to new CBS- 
TV Spot Sales offices. 

B 

J. O. Willett acquires 98% ownership of KFAZ, Mon- 
roe, La. (Ch. 43) by reason of FCC decision this week 
authorizing transfer of Howard E. Griffiths’ 49% for 
$25,500 and other considerations. Mr. Willett, motor car- 
rier and pipeline operator, went into the venture last year 
in association with Mr. Griffiths, an industi’ial communica- 
tions consultant, who apparently is pulling out because, as 
transfer application stated, “Operation of KFAZ to date 
has been unprofitable principally due to its inability to 
obtain a network affiliation. [It] competes with vhf sta- 
tion KNOE-TV [Ch. 8, owned by ex-Lt. Gov. James A. Noe 
and affiliated with all 4 networks] which commenced opera- 
tion after KFAZ went on the air.” KFAZ started last 
Aug. 11, KNOE-TV Sept. 26. Population (1950 census) of 
Monroe, La.: 38,572. 

Authority to strike against 4 networks “if necessary” 
was voted Feb. 3 by membership of New York Local 802, 
American Federation of Musicians. Union “suspended” 
talks with ABC, CBS, NBC & MBS for contract renewals; 
it’s asking that networks use live music on all TV-radio 
shov/s where music is played, in addition to 15% pay boost. 

Application advertising and 30-day cutoff rule, pro- 
posed by FCC last July to speed processing (Vol. 9:27,33), 
was found to be neither necessary nor popular and Com- 
mission dropped the proposal this week. 

Stuart Sherman has resigned as an officer & director 
of Sherman & Marquette, and his partnership acquired by 
company. 



Maj. Edwin H. Armstrong, 63, inventor of FM, the 
superheterodyne, the regenerative and the super-regen- 
erative circuits, died Feb. 1 after plunge from window of 
his luxurious 13th floor apartment in River House, New 
York. That he had jumped was apparent from notes he 
left his wife and sole survivor, Marion, who was away 
visiting her sister in Conn, at the time; the notes indicated 
strained relations between them, for he expressed regret 
that he had hurt her and stated it was “heartbreaking” 
that he could not see her again. He also stated his estate 
was solvent, making mention of his litigation with RCA 
and “the telephone company.” In recent years. Dr. Arm- 
strong has spent most of his time in infringement litiga- 
tion, largely against those companies, recently filing suits 
also against other manufacturers (Vol. 10:3). One of 
radio’s greatest inventors, he was a boy prodigy, became 
a protege of famed Michael P. Pupin, to whose Columbia 
U chair as professor of engineering he succeeded in 1934. 
He was, as the New York Times stated editorially Feb. 2, 
“one of the most brilliant, complex and controversial fig- 
ures in the realm of radio engineering.” His large fortune 
derived largely from the sale of certain of his patent 
rights, in exchange for stock, during the early days of 
RCA. He sold the stock at peak. His wife was onetime 
secretary to RCA’s David Sarnoff when latter was execu- 
tive v.p. of the company. 

Wires Romulo O’Farrill Feb. 1 in belated reply to our 
Jan. 27 telegram to Mexico City: “At present not contem- 
plating moving XELD-TV.” He thus answers the widely 
published reports that XELD-TV, Matamoros (Ch. 7), 
across border from Browns-ville, Tex., has been authorized 
to move to another city in Mexico (Vol. 10:5). No such 
authorization has been given by Mexican Ministry of Com- 
munications, said a spokesm.an, nor are there any plans to 
quit the area simply because there’s now competition from 
KGBT-TV, Harlingen (Ch. 4) and shortly wdll be more 
fi’om upcoming KRGV-TV, Weslaco (Ch. 5). Harlingen 
station acquired CBS, Weslaco will be NBC, but Mexican- 
operated station, while admitting tougher competitive situ- 
ation, maintains it can continue in business by virtue of 
excellent signal, favorable rate structure and good record 
of service to audience and sponsors. 

Three new applications for TV stations w'ere filed 
with FCC this week, 4 were dismissed, leaving 320 pending 
(61 uhf). Week’s applications: for Dothan, Ala., Ch. 9, by 
local group headed by builder Charles Woods; for El 
Paso, Tex., Ch. 13 by KELP (Texas broadcasters Barton 
& Gordon McLendon, former principals in Liberty net- 
work); for Buffalo, Ch. 7, by WKBW, replacing same 
group’s present application, but with new minority stock- 
holders. [For further details about these applications, see 
TV Addenda 18-E herewith; for complete listings of all 
grants, new applications, dismissals, hearings, etc., see 
TV Faetbook No. 18 and Addenda to date.] 

Network interconnections this week: WCSC-TV, 

Charleston, S. C.; KOMU-TV, Columbia, Mo.; KWFT-TV & 
KFDX-TV, Wichita Falls, Tex.; KHOL-TV, Kearney, Neb. 
AT&T long lines dept, this week applied with FCC to 
construct 2 westbound TV channels from Amarillo to 
Albuquerque, to be completed by late summer. Eventually 
it intends to build eastbound channel from Los Angeles 
to Las Vegas, thence to Albuquerque, providing new west- 
to-east route. KOB-TV, Albuquerque, has signed inter- 
connection contract with NBC. 

There were 6,432,000 TV installations during 1953, re- 
ports NBC research director Hugh M. Beville Jr., bringing 
total in U. S. to 27,666,000. It was best year since 1950 
when 6,600,000 were installed. Beville estimates post- 
freeze markets accounted for 2,626,000 new sets or nearly 
41% of the 1963 increase. 




MARTIN COREL’S 

AUTHORITATIVE NEWS SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY^ItpAp jEW^ BUB^iW^I^ WASHINGTON 5. D.C. • TELEPHONE STEBUN6 3-1755 • VOL. 10: No. 7 






L ' 'w 



in this 
issue: 



Filling the 'Holes' in Station Coverage, poge I 
5 New Starters, DuMont's KCTY Quits, page 2 
RCA's New UHF Station Equipment Plans, page 3 
Brisk Pickup in Action Brings 6 CPs, page 3 
Color Status at Station & Program Level, page 4 



195 ^ 



February 13, 1954 

'Coiar TV Age' Awaits Bigger Screens, page 5 
Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 8 
Color Experts Report on Transcriptions, page 10 
Good Monochrome Sales, Color Effect Minor, page 1 1 
CBS-Nielsen Survey of TV Set Ownership, page 14 



FILLING THE 'HOLES' IN STATION COVERAGE: Conc e pt, of satellite and booster stations 
keeps cropping up, and time is getting closer when FCC will give matter serious con- 
sideration. Commission still regards establishment of regular stations as its prime 
occupation, but it believes that this main vein will be sufficiently worked out to 
permit delving into supplementary services before end of year. 

As Comr. George Sterling indicated in recent Boston speech (Vol. 10:5), the 
problems of uhf coverage with present transmitters and receivers causes Commission 
to view satellites and boosters more favorably than it would otherwise. Sylvania 
has already asked FCC to establish satellites on a regular basis (Vol. 9:38), and 
WSM-TV, Nashville , has petitioned for authorization of boosters (Vol. 9:45). Commis- 
sion considers these quite helpful but wants more comment . Chairman Rosel Hyde says 
he regards Sterling's speech as a trial balloon, hopes it brings more ideas. 

So eager is Commission to aid uhf that one top staff member says he believes 
FCC may be willing to issue special temporary authority now to stations willing to 
build small repeaters to fill "holes" within their coverage areas — say up to 60 mi. 

In issuing such authorizations . Commission would probably require proof that 
new little stations would indeed make the difference between service and no service . 
It would also require that they wouldn't disturb spacings of its allocation plan. 

Definitions of boosters and satellites should be made clear, to show the 
different problems involved in each. A booster is small station which picks up and 
rebroadcasts programs from an originating station, using same channel as originating 
station. Satellite employs channel different from that of originating station. 

Commission seems particularly impressed with satellite plan of Sylvania be- 
cause it would safeguard allocation plan and give satellites opportunity to grow 
into regular independent stations capable of providing local expression. On other 
hand, it likes principle of boosters because they don't use up extra channels , but 
it's leery of the possibility that originating station could use boosters to extend 
coverage at expense of co-channel and adjacent-channel stations. 

There's not too much interest in granting satellites and/or boosters to vhf 
stations with good coverage. Says one commissioner: " They're not suffering ." On 
other hand, FCC is bound to consider any method of bringing service to communities 
which would not otherwise get it. 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



Approach to satellite status , at least as far as FCC rules allow, has been 
made by a few broadcasters. W.D. Rogers, KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Tex., came to Commis- 
sion with idea that he build stations in Big Spring and Sweetwater, feed them from 
Lubbock, o perating with absolute minimum — in local programming, equipment, person- 
nel. He now has CP for KPAR-TV, Sweetwater (Ch. 12), with 2.95-kw ERP, estimated 



COPYRIQHT 19B4 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



- 2 - 

construction cost of $93,213, yearly operating cost of $90,000. His application for 
Big Spring is being contested by another applicant. 

Another approach is that of Frank Hoy , operator of WPMT, Portland, Me. (Ch. 
53) and WLAM-TV, Lewiston (Ch. 17). He feeds Lewiston with direct off-air pickup 
from Portland. Though the Class A hour rate for Portland is $200, sponsor can add 
Lewiston for mere $25 more — for combination rate of $225. 

One of most ambitious projects was proposed just this week by parts manufac- 
turer Sarkes Taraian , who operates WTIV, Bloomington, Ind. Aiming to build 3 uhf 
" almost satellites ," he petitioned FCC to reshuffle allocation so as to put low-band 
Ch. 21 in Huntington , Ch. 23 in Anderson , Ch. 25 in Logansport . He plans to apply 
in those towns, program as much as FCC will allow by microwave feeds from the Bloom- 
ington "mother" station. 

Tarzian will build own uhf transmitters , has filed for experimental uhf sta- 
tion in Bloomington to test equipment and coverage. 

What the satellite and booster proponents would like is to extend these con- 
cepts much further — to 100-watt transmitters, 100-ft. towers, remote operation, 
no local originations, part-time engineers, etc. Sylvania estimates satellites can 
be built for $15-$20,000 each. 

Until day comes that TV stations can be built and programmed as cheaply as 
AM, relative to income. Commission is likely to look with more and more favor on 
these supplementary stations to expand TV. What it doesn't want to do, however, is 
to bollix up its allocation plan in the process or to preclude the growth of these 
"fillers" into full-fledged community media. 

5 NEW STARTERS; DuNONT'S KCTY QUITS: Biggest week so far this year for new stations 
saw 5 more go on air, including Puerto Rico's first — for total of 367 now in oper- 
ation, of which 128 are uhf. Eleven stations have started since Jan. 1. 

DuMont this week decided to abandon its uhf experiment in Kansas City in the 
interest of "sound business judgment." Sudden announcement at week's end told of 
decision to close down KCTY (Ch. 25), which it acquired just 6 weeks ago from Empire 
Coil Co. for $1 (Vol. 10:1). Network said it had studied situation carefully and 
concluded Kansas City viewers were adequately served by their 3 vhf outlets . State- 
ment by Dr. Allen B. DuMont stressed that the problems were "peculiar to Kansas City 
and not necessarily fundamental limitations of uhf broadcasting in general." 

KCTY will turn off juice Feb. 28 to become 3rd uhf station to go off air — 
out of total of 130 uhf starters. Other two were Roanoke's WROV-TV and Buffalo's 
WBES-TV. Two post-freeze vhf outlets also went dark pending changes in ownership. 
The new stations which began operation this week: 

WKAQ-TV, San Juan, P.R . (Ch. 2) is now testing 5-kw GE transmitter, aiming at 
commercial start Feb. 14 with telecast of Caribbean baseball series next week as its 
first big event. It began with interim power of 4.9-kw ERP from temporary antenna 
75-ft. above ground on 1973-ft. Marquessa Mt., 12 mi. from downtown, later plans to 
go to maximvun 100-kw from 300-ft. tower. It's CBS affiliate, plans both Spanish and 
English language programs. Owner Angel Ramos is publisher of El Mundo. R. Delgado 
Marquez is gen. mgr.; David Polinger, commercial mgr.; Fernando Cortes Jr., program 
mgr. ; Angel del Valle, chief engineer. Base hour rate is $200. Inter-American Pub- 
lications is rep. San Juan's second station, WAPA-TV (Ch. 4), is due soon. 

WNEM-TV, Bay City-Saginaw, Mich . (Ch. 5) started test patterns Feb. 11 after 
series of bad-weather delays, plans NBC & DuMont programming soon via AT&T relay 
from Detroit. It's first local competition for WKNX-TV, Saginaw (Ch. 57), which be- 
gan last April. WNEM-TV has 5-kw DuMont transmitter, with 400-ft. Stainless tower 
4 mi. NE of Saginaw. Station resulted from merger of local WGRO & WSAM. President 
is James Gerity Jr . (WGRO) ; Milton L. Greenebaum (WSAM) is v.p. ; John H. Bone, ex- 
WLWT, Cincinnati, is gen. mgr. ; Harvey M. West Jr., commercial mgr. ; Lee Stevens, 
acting chief engineer. Base hour rate is $350. Headley-Reed is rep. 

WRDW-TV, Augusta. Ga . (Ch. 12) beamed first test pattern Feb. 9 from 10-kw 
RCA transmitter and 12-bay antenna on 425-ft. Emsco tower, plans Feb. 14 commercial 
debut with CBS programs. It's city's 2nd vhf, WJBF-TV (Ch. 6) having begun last 



- 3 - 



fall. WRDW-TV calls its downtown TV Center "one of most modern in the south." Its 
principals are pres. Grover C. Maxwell ; v.p. Harry W. Jernigan; exec. v.p. Allen M. 
Woodall (who also is part owner of WDAK-IV, Columbus and WETV, Macon) ; gen. mgr. W. 
Ray Kingston. Roger J. LaReau is station mgr. and Sammy Barton is production mgr. 
Base Class A hour rate is $200. Rep is Headley-Read. 

XBID-TV, Fresno (Ch. 53), third in that all-uhf city, sent out first test 
pattern Feb. 8, began programming Feb. 13 with 15-hour telethon for Fresno County 
Heart Assn. It's first of 3 California stations being built by John Poole , wealthy 
pioneer uhf enthusiast, shares site and tower with KMJ-TV on Bear Mt., 2254 feet 
above average terrain, has 12-kw GE transmitter with directional antenna designed to 
beam equivalent of 470-kw ERP into Fresno. Unaffiliated station plans both live and 
film programming, including 3-hour live Spanish language show Saturday nights. Gen. 
mgr. is Robert H. Wesson , ex-KHQ-TV, Spokane ; chief engineer, Ralph E. Smith, ex- 
KFMB-TV, San Diego ; program director, Hal Davis. Base rate is $225. Meeker is rep. 

WMGT, Adams-Pittsf ield. Mass . (Ch. 74), first local station for area, began 
tests Feb. 5 with 12-kw GE transmitter and RCA antenna atop Mt. Greylock, 2060-ft. 
above average terrain. Nearest other TV stations are in Schenectady, 43 mi. from 
Adams, and Holyoke, 38 mi. Leon Podolsky of Sprague Electric Co. heads grantee. 

John T. Parsons is gen. mgr.; Leon Levando, chief engineer; Don Selby, production 
mgr. It's DiiMont affiliate, also plans to rebroadcast sports events from WPIX, New 
York. Base hour rate is $250. Walker is rep. 

RCA's NEW UHF STATION EQUIPMENT PLANS: Details on price and availability of its new 
12)^-kw uhf transmitter were released this week by RCA — along with slash of $10,000 
in the price of its 1-kw unit. 

RCA aims to catch up with competition in higher-powered uhf field with its 
i newly announced 12)^-kw tetrode transmitter (Vol. 10:4). It gave out specifications 
to consulting engineers at Washington seminar Feb. 11, and announced these prices: 

Complete 12}^-kw transmitter , including all tubes, crystals and filterplexer 
— $144,500 . Amplifier to convert existing 1-kw unit to 12'i-kw — $99,500 . Since 
the new transmitter (type TTU-12A) replaces originally announced 10-kw (TTU-lOA), 
those stations with orders for 10-kw get price break . Latter units were ordered in 
advance at guaranteed maximum price, and as result RCA will sell its 12)^-kw ampli- 
fiers to those customers at $86,900 instead of $99,500. 

Deliveries begin in June , first ones going to customers with long-standing 
orders — such uhf pioneers as Wilkes-Barre's WBRE-TV and South Bend's WSBT-TV and 
others in first batch of uhf starters of late 1952 and early 1953. After producing 
2 or 3 in June, RCA plans to step up output to 5-6 a month — more if there's steady 
stream of new orders. Company says it has 30-40 back orders for the new unit, could 
catch up with these by Oct. or earlier. 

In 1-kw field, price reduction from $57,500 to $47,50 0 was made possible by 
I cost decreases and production economies such as elimination of overtime, says RCA. 

!| And it continues to hammer away at its favorite theme — color — stressing that all 
♦ transmitters delivered will be equipped to handle it from start (see p. 4). 

Another innovation announced by RCA ; All uhf antennas will be measured for 
' complete vertical and horizontal patterns before leaving factory. Previously they 
' were spot checked. Also, RCA will make "ground check" of antenna at station to make 

sure no adjustments were harmed during shipment. Such antenna pre-measurement was 

urged by FCC Comr. George Sterling in recent speech before Boston IRE (Vol. 10:5). 

J BRISK PICKUP IN ACTION BRINGS 6 CPs: it has been decidedly slow year in terms of CPs 

but this week was an exception — producing 6 grants and an initial decision. There 
was nice crop of 5 new stations on air , though week also brought sudden announce- 
?i ment from DuMont that it is shutting down its newly-acquired uhf KCTY, Kansas City 

(Ch. 25), deciding market can't support it along with 3 vhfs (see p. 2). And an- 

I other uhf CP was turned in — WMEV-TV, Marion, Va. (Ch. 50). The week's grants: 

El Centro, Cal ., Valley Empire Telecasters, Ch. 16; Stockton. Cal .. KSBR, 

Ch. 13; Chicago, 111 ., WOPA, Ch. 44; Elyria, 0 . , WEOL, Ch. 31; Charleston, W.Va . . 



- 4 - 



WCHS, Ch. 8; Wausau, Wis ., WOSA, Ch. 16. Initial decision was one of the tough 
ones, with Mobile TV Corp. favored over WKRG for Ch. 6 in Mobile, Ala. 

One of most interesting grants is that in Stockton. It's controlled by TV 
maker H.L. Hoffman and is his first venture into station ownership. He plans to 
utilize KSBR building and tower on 5849-ft. Mt. Diablo , has RCA transmitter on order, 
hopes to be radiating 25-kw ERP by May. 

Mobile case was difficult to decide . Examiner H. Gifford Irion said, but he 
finally chose Mobile TV Corp. because of "decided superiority in its studio design, 
production equipment, staff training, care in preparation, potentiality for expan- 
sion and, above all, its capable leadership." Proposed winner is 24% owned by Edgar 
Stern Jr., 10% by Robert Swezey — principals of WDSU-TV, New Orleans . Pres, and 
15% owner is Dwight Martin, formerly v.p. of Crosley and General Teleradio. 

♦ I* * * 

Tackling one aspect of its multiple ownership rules , FCC handed Westinghouse 
some unwelcome news in answering latter's request for clarification of rule (Vol. 
10:3). Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. had asked FCC to assure it that minority hold- 
ings of directors of parent Westinghouse Electric Co. wouldn't be counted in total 
stations permitted. 

No indeed. Commission said , those holdings count. Thus, Westinghouse is now 
credited with 6 stations : WBZ-TV, Boston and WPTZ, Philadelphia, plus the 4 stations 
in which director John Schiff owns 15% — WFTV, Duluth; KETV, Little Rock; KCTV, 
Sioux City; WICS, Springfield, 111. Westinghouse also has applications pending for 
Pittsburgh and Portland, Ore. 

Company hasn't indicated plans , presumably will ask for waiver permitting it 
to go ahead with hearings in Pittsburgh and Portland, decide what to dispose of 
later — unless it wants to challenge FCC rules in courts as Storer Bcstg. Co. is 
doing (Vol. 10:4). Comrs. Sterling and Doerfer dissented , former saying he wanted 
to study similar cases first and wait for outcome of Storer appeal, latter saying 
"the interpretation extends a doubtful exercise of rule-making power beyond the pale 
of administrative law. [Rule's purpose] was to limit control but not influence." 

Among other actions , FCC this week: (1) Received its Broadcast Bureau's rec- 
ommendation that Niagara Frontier Amusement Corp. get CP for Ch. 2 in Buffalo and 
be absolved from blame in "strike" application to-do (see p. 10). (2) Appointed a 

new hearing examiner and made him chief of examiners — something FCC hasn't had for 
years. He's Edward T. Stodola , now in charge of various CAB hearings. He's 45, a 
native of Wisconsin, has been CAB examiner since 1943. (3) Proposed to shift Ch. 3 

from Lewiston, Ida. to Richland, Wash. (4) Set March 12 for start of Ch. 2 hearing 
for Bangor, Me. and Ch. 18 hearing for Fayetteville, N.C. 

COLOR STATUS AT STATION & PROGRAM LEVEL: The race for station color equipment sales 
became a bit more feverish this week as RCA levelled two attacks at competition 
during uhf-color seminar for consulting engineers in Washington Feb. 11: 

( 1 ) Announced it would equip for rebroadcast of network color all stations 
using its transmitters — without charge . Furthermore, the 30-odd stations already 
so equipped will not be billed. Since cost of modifying stations runs up to |25,000 
or so, this means an RCA outlay of seven figures. 

In addition to equipping existing stations for color, RCA will henceforth 
ship all new transmitters already modified for color or accompanied with kits. 

(2) Talked down cost-performance claims for CBS-type field-sequential camera 
equipment being made by GE (Vol. 10:5). 

About all RCA would concede CBS-GE camera setup is lighter weight — 120 lbs. 
vs. 300 for RCA's 3-tube camera. Aside from that, RCA engineer Andrew Inglis told 
consultants, system has innumerable drawbacks. 

It produces "a picture of a picture ," he said, with all the possibilities of 
degradation that implies. He said that initial cost can favor either type of equip- 
ment, depending on number of cameras; that field-sequential type is likely to need 



5 



50-100% more light at studio ; that station "has all its eggs in one basket" if it 
has one field-sequential coder serving several cameras. 

Inglis also refuted common belie f that the 3 tubes in RCA cameras must be 
perfectly matched. He said camera controls compensate for differences. He also 
made surprising statement that tubes last longer for color than for black-&-white , 
because each gets less illumination. "Based on limited experience," he said, "we 
estimate image orthicon life in color cameras at about 750 hours." Customary life 
of tubes in monochrome use is about 500 hours. 

These criticisms are pooh-poohed by GE v.p. Dr. W. R. G. Baker who reports 
"very encouraging" results to date, says GE already has station orders for cameras 
in addition to the 4 being built for CBS (Vol. 10:5). 

:J: :{( si: 

Color programming continues to build up gradually, meanwhile. NBC's sched- 
ule (Vol. 10:5) still holds with these changes; Taming of the Shrew opera has been 
added for March 13 ; Eddie Fisher show has been shifted to March 31 ; mobile unit is 
due back in service next month, and plans are afoot for New York St. Patrick's pa- 
rade March 17 and Easter parade April 18, plus Gillette fights starting in April. 

There are still only 50-odd stations equipped to rebroadcast color, and AT&T 
has equipped no more routes for color than were employed Jan. 1 (Vol. 9:52). No 
coaxial segments are to be ready until April. 

AT&T still hasn't filed rates for color . After compiling schedule, AT&T 
showed it to network officials who made it clear they thought proposed rates were 
so steep that they'd stifle growth of colo r. This week, AT&T indicated it would 
continue to hold rates in abeyance by filing with FCC a request for extension to 
May 15 of its present experimental rates for color. 

CBS added WKBN-TV, Youngstown , to New York and Baltimore for Feb. 5 show, 
will shortly add WBBM-TV, Chicago — others soon as they're equipped to rebroadcast. 

^ ^ 

There's bitter complaint from Los Angeles set manufacturer that NBC's color 
programs are rarely broadcast there, must be viewed on closed circuit at RCA Indus- 
try Service Labs in Hollywood. Since Jan. 1, only the Tournament of Roses and Zoo 
Parade have been transmitted by KNBH. 

" It's the old time-difference problem ," says NBC official, noting that "hot 
kines" suffice for delayed black-&-white broadcasts but that comparable process for 
color isn't yet available. "However," he said, "we have a plan under study whereby 
we may put color programs on later so that KNBH can broadcast them." 

'COLOR TV AGE' AWAITS BIGGER SCREENS: Will 15-in. color sets ever go "on sale " to the 
public in real quantities? Many important set and tube makers think not. 

Promises of 19-in. tube production in latter half of this year — added to 
today's healthy black-&-white sales (see p. 11) — seem to have dampened industry's 
urgency to get 15-in. sets on the market, and a number of top-name set manufacturers 
now say they don't plan to merchandise 15-in. sets at all. 

These reports are authenticated by some tube makers, who say they're equipped 
to produce the small color tubes but have no quantity orders . RCA, one of the nota- 
ble exceptions, reports it is "shipping 15-in. tubes as fast as we can make them." 

The picture easily could change overnight . If RCA or some other leader makes 
big sales pitch for 15-in. and backs it up with s aleable quantitie s of sets, many of 
the others are prepared to swing into production to keep competitive positions. 

Here's the general pattern for many set makers with regard to 15-in. color 
receivers; They plan to turn out 50-500 sets eac h "just to get the feel of color." 
These aren't intended for sale, v/ill v/ind up in homes of their top executives and 
at their biggest distributors for barnstorming tours of dealers. 

There may be some surprises soon in color set field — and officials of many 
companies are understandably reluctant to be quoted by name in this highly competi- 
tive situation. But the comments we were able to get from receiver and picture tube 
makers are indicative of feeling and atmosphere as of today; 



6 



" The 19-in. tube is coming; the second half of this year," says an RCA spokes- 
man, who adds that company will be equipped to shift emphasis easily between 15 & 
19-in. tubes, according to demand from its set-making customers. "But if people 
will be willing to spend |1000 for the 15, they'll be willing to put up another $500 
or whatever extra it will cost to get the 19." 

The real answer will com e when public can see all makes, side by side, with 
pictures on the screen — " and with price tags ." he says. Might RCA be planning to 
cut the S175 price of its 15-in. tube (CBS's is due to sell for $125)? "That price 
can't last indefinitely," this spokesman says, "when the 21-in. black-&-white sells 
for about $20." As to what's coming in future, the RCA official tells us; 

" Everyone has something in the back room — RCA, GE, Philco, Sylvania. " And 
it's obvious, no one intends to tell until the time is ripe. 

Admiral doesn't believe 15-in. set is "merchandisable size". A company source 
says real color production awaits larger tube, but stands by pres. Ross Siragusa's 
prediction Admiral alone will turn out 30,000 color sets this year (Vol. 10:1). 

Philco continues to be an enigma , but it's good guess that if it produces any 
15-in. sets at all, they'll be mere trickle for exhibition only . Philco people quote 
tube makers as saying 19-in. color sets probably won't be available in good quan- 
tities till Nov. — but this isn't necessarily tip-off on Philco plans. 

DuMont marketing v.p. V/.H. Kelley says 19-in. tube is in the offing, but can't 
say just when. It's not making 15-in., is buying them from another source for de- 
velopmental purposes, but doesn't believe that size screen is commercially acceptable. 
Adds Kelley; "We would be perpetrating an injustice on the industry if we tried to 
produce and sell current-sized models." 

A CBS topkick agrees with RCA that 19-in. will probably come along in last 
half of year. He adds that production rate toward end of year could reach astro- 
nomical proportions, and predicts the public will snap up whatever is produced this 
year. CBS-Hytron's 19-in. tube, he says, will have 205 sq. in. picture compared to 
RCA's 162 (and RCA, of course, claims superior brightness, convergence, etc.). 

GE is now turning out some RCA-type 15-in . tubes, electronics v.p. Dr. W.R.G. 
Baker tells us — and says he'll reveal what else he's working on in month or two. 
Rumors persist that GE's secret weapon is 3-gun grid type tube. 

Sylvania is producing some color tubes , presumably 15-in. RCA type. "What we 
can't tell you is whether the tube is what you ought to have in your TV set," board 
chairman Don G. Mitchell told advertising seminar in New York this week. His ad- 
vice to public was to hold off buying colo r set until next year when 19-in. will 
cost less than today's 15-in. He predicted cool buyer reaction to $1000 receivers. 

" Everyone is holding his breath on the 15-&-19-in. question," says another 
big set maker, requesting anonymity. "I wish I knew what to do. No one is going 
all-out on the 15-in. model." 

" We are buying and producing very little color ," states a set & tube maker. 

"A lot of work remains to be done on the 19-in. , and production won't be as easy as 
we first thought it would be. We know the 15- in. won't last very long — but the 
situation is very fluid, could change from day to day. We're caught in a squeeze 
between RCA & CBS, and what GE will do is anybody's guess. The set makers are check- 
ing their enthusiasm for quick color because black-&-white business has held up bet- 
ter than expected. They're digging in their heels and making haste more slowly." 

^ 

" The 15-in. looks like it will die a-borning ," observes Asher Cole, president 
of independent tube maker National Video Corp . He says he can begin production of 
15-in. RCA-type tube on short notice, but has no requests for more than sample quan- 
tities. As for 19-in., he echoes some other tube makers in saying it's extremely 
complicated from standpoint of circuitry and manufacture, isn't just a "larger model 
of the 15-in. " but a completely different design. 

National Video is licensee of both RCA and Chromatic, and Cole says his en- 
gineers have worked out "e ntirely different approach " to latter's grid type tube, 
v;hich has "practically licked radiation problems and improved resolution." But he 



7 



admits he doesn't know which type he'll end up producing — "the answer may v/ell be 
something entirely different." 

Whatever bottlenecks develop in larger color tubes, it looks as if glass 
won't be one of them. Corning is now producing bulbs for both 15-&-19-i n. sizes, 
and says it can take care of any foreseeable demand for either size. Electronic 
dept, sales mgr. J.B. Muller tells us developmental samples of 21-in. rectangular 
bulb have also gone out to tube makers. It's "universal" type, can accommodate CBS, 
Chromatic, RCA or any other types, can be adapted to various deflection angles. 

Pilot production of 21-in. rectangular bulb should begin about May 1, accord- 
ing to Muller. But he warns that this doesn't necessarily mean 19-in. round will 
quickly be obsoleted, as was the pattern in black-&-white. He points out rectangu- 
lar tubes were made necessary by demand for big-screen table models — but color 
table sets are long way off, so there should be no particular rush for compact color 
tubes. And round tubes are easier to make, may be cheaper for some time. 



Station Accounts: Oklahoma city’s KWTV (Ch. 9), on 
the air only 2 months under gen. managership of Edgar 
T. Bell, reports 35 national spot accounts currently adver- 
tising 47 different products — these in addition to 67 CBS 
network accounts. National spot list, thru Avery-Knodel, 
includes m.ost of the 28 top spot users listed for 4th quar- 
ter 1953 in latest Rorahaugh Report on Spot TV Adver- 
tising . . . Value of furniture ads on TV exemplified by big 
response to Woman’s World, sponsored and coordinated by 
Northwest Furniture Mfrs. Assn, on KOMO-TV, Seattle, 
Wed. 3-3:20 p.m., and featuring furniture displays; and 
in Denver, local FURN Club sponsors similar weekly pro- 
gram, Home and Kitchen, on KOA-TV, but no individual 
products are advertised . . . Norwegian Canners Assn, ties 
in Lenten TV-radio spot campaign with 4 major cracker 
companies — Premium, Salerno, Educator & Snow Flake — 
to boost Norwegian sardines, thru McCann-Erickson . . . 
Rise (shaving cream) and Schwayder Bros. (Samsonite 
luggage) buy Ziv’s newly acquired Mr. District Attormey 
for 40 top markets, former thru Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell 
& Bayles, latter thru Grey Adv. . . . Record sale boom 
reported resulting from co-op tie-in by 9 Detroit record 
dealers for sponsorship of Columbia 360 Show on WXYZ- 
TV, with plans being made to extend promotion . . . 
Weatherguard (storm windows) and King Wines buy 
Racket Squad on WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, Mon.-thru-Fri. 
11-11:30 p.m. . . . Zeeman Clothing Co. buys ll:30-mid- 
night segment of Juke Box Jury on 14-station CBS Pacific 
Network, thru Factor-Breyer Inc., Los Angeles . . . Philco 
Distributors and dealer Mort Farr team up to sponsor 15- 
min. segment of 30-min. Fun and. Fortune daily on WCAU- 
TV, Philadelphia; it’s in addition to Man About Town, 
which Farr sponsors on WCAU-TV Sun. 11:15-11:30 p.m. 
. . . Rybutol, old network account, moves into local opera- 
tions with Best Movie of the Week on WABC-TV Sat. 11 
p.m.-rnidnight, thru Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford, 
N. Y. . . . Westinghouse appliance div. and Jergens Co. to 
use TV spots for 4-month tie-in sale by which consumer 
obtains coupons towaid purchase of iron with every pur- 
chase of soap . . . Among other advertisers reported using 
or preparing to use TV : Friden Calculating Machine Co., 
San Leandro, Cal. (calculating machines), thru J. Walter 
Thompson, San Francisco; Thenylhist Co., Chicago (Tenil- 
hist cough syrup), thru Pams Adv., Dallas; Atlantic Elec- 
tronics Inc. (.lefferson picture tubes), thru C. Keshian 
Adv., Paterson, N. J.; Dorothy Gray Ltd. (cosmetics), thru 
Lennen & Newell; Imperial Sugar Co., Sugar Land, Tex. 
(Imperial cane sugar), thru Tracy-Locks Co., Dallas; 
.Maurer-Neuer Corp., Kansas City, Mo. (meat packers), 
thru C. Wendel Muench & Co., Chicago; Mrs. Tucker’s 
Foods Inc., Sherman, Tex. (Meadolake margarine), thru 
Ciook Adv., Dallas; Federal Products Co., Evanston, 111. 
(sporting goods), thru A. N. Baker Co., Chicago. 



Proud of its record of processing TV applications, FCC 
this week released tabulation showing its disposition of 
applications since freeze, amplifying on our summary 
(Vol. 10:6). It points out that it has granted CPs for 
75% of the channels sought and that of 321 pending ap- 
plications all but 53 are competitive. It also analyzed sta- 
tions on air, CPs and applications in several ways. For 
example, it shows that 59.6% of stations are in 1-station 
communities, 29.2% in 2-station, 7.6% in 3-station, 3.6% 
in cities vidth 4 or more. If all existing CPs get on air, 
respective figures will be 58.1%, 24%, 10.2%, 7.7%. And 
assuming all channels applied for become stations, figures 
will be 53.6%, 24.2%, 10.8%, 11.4%. Treating markets 
as metropolitan areas defined by U. S. Census, analysis 
shows 120 vhf-only cities, 71 uhf-only, 32 vhf-uhf. FCC 
economists make it clear that figures don’t represent signal 
availabilities from stations outside metropolitan areas, 
should be weighed accordingly. Among other breakdowns 
are figures on number of 1-vhf cities, 1-uhf cities, 2-vhf 
cities, 2-uhf cities, etc. — based on existing stations, on CPs 
and on pending applications. 

Absence of Sen. Edwin Johnson (D-Colo.) from newly 
named communications subcommittee of Senate Commerce 
Committee (Vol. 10:6) doesn’t mean the former committee 
chairman has lost any of his intense interest in TV-radio 
affairs. As ranking minority member, Johnson selected 
the Democratic members of subcommittee, wanted to give 
newer members opportunity to familiarize themselves 
with communications matters. He still will keep close 
tab on matters affecting TV-radio, and will of course 
be in on all important decisions — which will be made by 
full committee. Sen. Johnson’s bill to restrict telecasting 
and broadcasting of pro baseball games (S. 1396) came 
up on Senate calendar again this week, but was passed 
over for 4th time. Also blocked along with many other 
bills were 3 House-passed measures requested by FCC, 
relating to protests (HR-4558), violations of Communica- 
tions Act (HR-4559) and abolishing CPs for govt., ama- 
teur & mobile stations (HR-4557). In the House, Rep. 
Wolverton (R-N. J.), chairman of Commerce Committee, 
introduced FCC-backed bill to amend Communications Act 
to keep protests from automatically halting effectiveness 
of CPs (HR-7795) ; it’s identical to S-2853, introduced 
by Sen. Bricker (R-0.) in Senate (Vol. 10:6). 

New community antenna organization, apparently with 
extensive plans, has been formed at Little Rock, Ark., as 
Midwest Video Corp. A member of group is C. Hamilton 
Moses, chairman of Arkansas Power & Light Co., who 
.‘^ays 25-30 communities from Arkansas to Oregon are 
under study. 

Communications Act, up-to-date as of Jan. 1, 1954, 
is now on sale at 55^ by Govt. Printing Office, Washington. 



8 



G eneral precision laboratory reports “one 

of the largest purchases ever made in radio or TV 
by one individual” — the sale of 3 complete uhf station 
packages to Robert W. Rounsaville for his stations in 
Cincinnati, Louisville and Atlanta. Purchase includes 3 
GPL-Continental 1-kw transmitters (made by Continental 
Electronics, Dallas), 3 antennas, 6 GPL-Pye camera 
chains, 3 vidicon film chains, six 16mm film projectors, and 
associated equipment. Installation has begun at WQXL- 
TV (formerly WLOU-TV), Louisville (Ch. 41), which has 
March target. WQXN-TV (formerly WCIN-TV), Cin- 
cinnati (Ch. 64) plans debut in early summer and WQXI- 
TV, Atlanta (Ch. 36) is due about Oct. Forjoe is rep 
for WQXL-TV & WQXN-TV; rep for WQXI-TV not an- 
nounced. 

RCA shipped its first 50-kw amplifier Feb. 13 — to 
share-time stations WMIN-TV & WTCN-TV, Minneapolis- 
St. Paul (Ch. 11). Only other transmitter shipment re- 
ported this week was RCA 10-kw to KVAL-TV, Eugene, 
Ore. (Ch. 13) Feb. 11. The RCA transmitter shipped last 
week to WMFD-TV, Wilmington, N. C. (Ch. 6) was 10-kw, 
not 5-kw as erroneously reported. 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these are the latest reports from grantees: 

WBRZ, Baton Rouge, La. (Ch. 2), granted Jan. 28, 
has mid-Sept. target, according to pres. Douglas L. Man- 
ship, publisher of Baton Rouge Advocate and State Times. 
Make of equipment and name of rep not reported. It’s 
first competition for WAFB-TV (Ch. 28) which began 
April, 1953. 

KULA-TV, Honolulu (Ch. 4), with 5-kw DuMont 
transmitter on its way via ship, now has April 9 target, 
according to asst. gen. mgr. Art Sprinkle, ex-KPHO-TV, 
Phoenix. It will be 3d vhf outlet there. Rep will be 
Headley-Reed. 

KFBC-TV, Cheyenne, Wyo. (Ch. 5) reports progress 
in rebuilding tower which was toppled last Dec. by 
windstorm (Vol. 9:60), but now has no specific target — 
it all depends on completion of tower, which could be de- 
layed by bad weather, says mgr. Wm. C. Grove. It’s 
equipped with 5-kw DuMont transmitter. D. E. Allen has 
been named TV sales mgr. Network will be CBS, base 
rate $150. Hollingbery will be rep. 

KDRO-TV, Sedalia, Mo. (Ch. 6), delayed by bad 
weather, has studio nearly completed, but has only 60% 
of its GE equipment, now hopes for April 1 start with 
5-kw GE transmitter, writes gen. mgr. Herb Brandes. Rep 
will be Pearson. 

KGKB-TV, Tyler, Tex. (Ch. 7), granted on Jan. 27, 
hasn’t ordered equipment or begun construction, hopes 
to get going next Aug., according to owner Lucille Ross 
Lansing. Rep not yet chosen. 

WMTW, Poland, Me. (Ch. 8 assigned to Lewiston), 
designed to be super-coverage outlet atop 6288-ft. Mt. 
Washington, N. H., is negotiating for RCA studio-trans- 
mitter equipment, begins adding to existing space on Mt. 
Washington about May 1 — weather permitting — and ex- 
pects to get going July 1, according to pres. John W. 
Guider. It expects to utilize old Yankee Network’s 50-ft. 
FM tower, may build another for second antenna. Re- 
modeling for studios in Riccar Inn, Poland Springs, Me., 
is already underway. Network will be CBS. Rep will be 
Harrington, Righter & Parsons. 

KPAR-TV, Sweetwater, Tex. (Ch. 12), has 500-watt 
DuMont transmitter and 400-ft. Andrews tower on order, 
but hasn’t set target date yet, reports pres. W. D. (Dub) 
Rogers. Grantee Texas Telecasting Inc. operates KDUB- 
TV, Lubbock, and plans to operate KPAR-TV virtually 
as satellite of Lubbock outlet. Same firm also is applicant 
for Ch. 4 in Big Spring, Tex., which, if granted, would 
also get satellite role. Rep will be Avery-Knodel. 



WALB-TV, Albany, Ga. (Ch. 10), granted Jan. 13, 
begins construction soon on TV-AM building, plans June 
1 start, reports owner James H. Gray, publisher of Albany 
Herald. Make of equipment not reported. Burn-Smith 
will be rep. 

WINK-TV, Fort Myers, Fla. (Ch. 11), oft delayed, 
now plans March 15 programming with 2-kw RCA trans- 
mitter, according to gen. mgr. A. J. Bauer. Owner is 
United Garage & Service Corp., Yellow Cab operators of 
Cleveland (Daniel Sherby, pres.). It will be ABC affiliate. 
Hour rate will be $150. Weed will be rep. 

KFVS-TV, Cape Girardeau, Mo. (Ch. 12), has studio 
building ready and footing & foundation in for transmit- 
ter house, now is negotiating for 808-ft. guyed tower, 
reports owner Oscar C. Hirsch. Target date not set, 
but “it will be later than April.” Transmitter make 
not I’eported. Rep will be Pearson. 

WHO-TV, Des Moines (Ch. 13) was delayed by an- 
tenna accident Feb. 10 when RCA 12-section supertum- 
stile was damaged. Antenna was only 4 ft. from ground 
when gin pole atop 700-ft. tower bent, causing estimated 
$40,000 damage and necessitating rebuilding of antenna. 
WHO-TV pres. Col. D. J. Palmer said mishap will post- 
pone debut “at least 3 weeks past the original March 15 
expected starting date.” No one was injured. 

WLOS-TV, Asheville, N. C. (Ch. 13), hasn’t ordered 
equipment yet, plans to start construction shortly, hopes 
to get on air in late spring or early summer using 300-ft. 
Lehigh tower atop Mt. Pisgah, reports commercial mgr. 
Bradley H. Roberts. Rep not yet chosen. 

WINT, Waterloo, Ind. (Ch. 15), got FCC approval 
in Jan. to increase power to 240-kw visual and to build 
higher tower, 830-ft. above av. terrain, at new location 
16 mi. north of Fort Wayne, now seeks network affiliation, 
plans to begin construction soon, reports pres. R. Morris 
Pierce, who operates radio WDOK, Cleveland. It has 
ordered 12-kw GE and 800-ft. Stainless tower. Target 
date not reported, but earlier plans were for March 
debut. Rep not yet chosen. 

WKDN-TV, Camden, N. J. (Ch. 17, allocated to Phil- 
adelphia), granted on Jan. 28, is planning additional hous- 
ing for TV studios and transmitter, but hasn’t ordered 
equipment or set specific target, reports pres. Ranulf 
Compton. It’s to be “community station built within 
financial confines that will make it possible for the local 
industrial, retail and service establishments to buy tele- 
vision advertising.” Rep not yet chosen. 

WOBS-TV, Jacksonville, Fla. (Ch. 30), has studios 
ready and GPL-Continental transmitter ordered for March 
delivery, plans April 15 tests, goes commercial May 1, 
reports gen. mgr. Jim Macri. Pres. & 60% owner is E. D. 
Rivers Sr., ex-Gov. of Georgia, who also owns WCTV, TV 
grantee for Thomasville, Ga. ; 50% of WMIE-TV, grantee 
for Miami, Fla.; and radios WLBS, Birmingham, and 
WGAA, Cedartown, Ga. Hour rate will be $150. Rep will 
be Stars National. 

WIMA-TV, Lima, 0. (Ch. 35) had planned start 
early this year, now has no fixed target, awaits delivery 
of 5-kw DuMont transmitter late next summer, reports 
gen. mgr. R. W. Mack. Weed will be rep. 

ii< * * * 

CHCH-TV, Hamilton, Ont. (Ch. 11), planning April 
start with RCA equipment, has tentative April 15 pro- 
gramming date, reports asst. mgr. S. J. Bibby. Wave- 
stack antenna designed by RCA is being built by Domin- 
ion Bridge. Bill Jeynes, ex-Rediffusion, Montreal (com- 
munity antenna service), has been named chief engineer; 
David Southwood, ex-BBC, and Tom Sutton, ex-WWJ-TV, 
producer-directors. Reps will be Adam Young (for U. S.) 
& All-Canada Television. 



A 



9 



Telecasting Notes: Enlightened plea for improvement 
of TV commercials comes from Feb. 13 Tide Magazine, 
which asks: “Are TV commercials as bad as they say?” — 
and then proceeds to imply answer is “yes” by quoting ad 
and research industry sources. Taking off from Bernays 
survey of leading citizens, which soundly berated TV com- 
mercial practices (Vol. 10:5), Tide confides that “certain 
influential people within advertising may themselves ap- 
proach the FCC, as Bernays has privately indicated he 
may do,” to seek more Commission leadership on subject 
. . . Fate of NBC’s 2 big variety shows — Comedy Hour & 
Your Show of Shows — has drawn considerable speculation 
for last year or so, and Feb. 13 Billboard reports they’ve 
been given virtual ultimatum to change format to situa- 
I tion comedy or perish . . . But variety shows won’t com- 
pletely disappear. Billboard reporting both NBC & CBS 
have plans on books for supercolossal “spectaculars” with 
top Hollywood talent, to be aired probably on monthly 
i basis — in color — with talent cost of $250,000 a show and 

up. ABC-TV, it says, already is negotiating for weekly 
30-min. show which “would almost certainly be the most 
I expensive such program on the air,” featuring Ringling 
circus acts direct from big top, probably sponsored by 
Wheaties . . . 2-hour all-star show on ABC, CBS & NBC TV 
networks next Oct. will climax observance of “Light’s 
Diamond Jubilee Year,” 75th anniversary of Edison’s 
invention of incandescent lamp; network show will be 
sponsored by electric companies and electrical manufac- 
turing firms, will follow heavy spot TV-radio schedule 
I through year by local utilities . . . “TV’s first repertory 
' theatre” is described as NBC’s major project for 1954 in 

' Feb. 10 Variety — which says it’s still hush-hush but net- 

I work, together with a major foundation and a top drama 



I 



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Personal Notes: Murray B. Grabhom, ex-WJZ-TV and 
onetime sales mgr. of ABC’s 0-&-0 stations, resigns as 
sales director of WATV & WAAT, Newark, will return to 
Los Angeles for undisclosed TV-radio sales connection . . . 
Thomas C. McCray, ex-NBC western div., named gen. mgr. 
of KNBH, Los Angeles, succeeding Don Norman, now 
managing director of oilman Edwin Pauley’s Television 
California, applicant for San Francisco’s Ch. 2 . . . Wade 
S. Patterson named gen. mgr. of KCRI-TV, Cedar Rapids, 
replacing Frank D. Rubel . . . Charles Stone promoted to 
sales v.p. of WMBR-TV & WMBR, Jacksonville, Fla. . . . 
Richard Krolik resigns as Life Magazine TV mgr. to be 
N. Y. mgr. of film packagers Nasht International Produc- 
tions . . . Ross Siragusa, Admiral pres., vacationing off 
Florida, reports record blue marlin catch of 593 lbs., 12-ft. 
8-in. long . . . J. A. Slusser named chief engineer of KOA- 
TV & KOA, Denver; Robert H. Owen, ex-director of techni- 
cal operations, to get another executive post after return 
from month’s vacation . . . Fred M. Farha promoted from 
commercial mgr. to gen. mgr. of KMPT, Oklahoma City, 
succeeding Byrne Ross, resigned . . . Roger M. Coelos, 
ex-operations mgr. of WTTG, Washington, named mgr. 
of KONA, Honolulu . . . Howard Stainaker, ex-Meredith 
Publishing Co., named commercial mgr. of KPHO-TV 
& KPHO, Phoenix . . . Robert Blake named publicity 
director of WNBT & WNBC, succeeding Phil Dean, 
who has opened own public relations office in Empire 
State Bldg. . . . Harry E. Travis, ex-WBKZ-TV, Battle 
Creek, named administrative asst, to John H. Bone, gen. 
mgr. of upcoming WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich. . . . J. P. 
Gilmore promoted to chief TV coordinator of CBC . . . 
Seymour Handy, asst, comptroller of MBS, named exec, 
asst, to Gordon Gray, General Teleradio v.p. in charge of 
WOR-TV & WOR . . . A1 Brown, ex-Wm. Rambeau Co., 
Chicago, named sales mgr. of WVEC-TV, Norfolk . . . 
Harry Tenenbaum elected v.p. of WTVI, St. Louis-Belle- 
ville. 111 ., continuing as asst, secy.-treas. . . . James A. 



school, plan alt. week Saturday afternoon 3-hour drama 
series, with acquisition of Broadway playhouse as perma- 
nent home for show . . . “New” ABC-TV studio, Terrace 
Casino of Chicago’s Morrison Hotel, will get first use Feb. 
15, when ABC-AM’s popular 9-10 a.m. Don McNeill’s 
Breakfast Club becomes regular simulcast; conversion of 
dining room to accommodate TV cost $155,000 ... 16 in- 
surance firms used spot TV in third quarter of 1953, twice 
as many as in comparable quarter of 1952, says Edward 
Petry & Co. in report. How Insurance Advertisers Use 
Sjwt TV . . . $100,000 lire which broke out in wall panel at 
studio of WKNA-TV, Charleston, S. C. and quickly spread 
to ceiling, caused loss of only IVz hours of air time; blaze 
was discovered shortly after sign-off Feb. 3, and round- 
the-clock work by staff and local business firms got sta- 
tion on air at 4 p.m. Feb. 4, instead of regular 2 :30 sign-on, 
wdth live telecast of fire damage . . . Call letter changes: 
KBAK-TV & KBAK Feb. 8 became new call letter’s of 
former KAFY-TV & KAFY, Bakersfield, Cal.; KCOK-TV, 
Tulare, Cal. changed to KVVG; WROL-TV, Knoxville, 
March 1 becomes WTVS, AM affiliates of both stations re- 
taining old call letters . . . TV-radio-film rights to British 
Empire Games July SO in Vancouver have been purchased 
by CBC for $50,000 . . . Teleprompter Corp. signs new 
long-term contract with CBS-TV for use of its prompting 
device for any or all progx’ams, now reports annual bill- 
ings near $1,000,000 . . . “The Local TV Station” will be 
theme of 4th annual regional TV seminar in Baltimore 
Feb. 26-27 for college students, sponsored by WAAM and 
5 universities, with Clair McCollough (Steinman stations) 
as chairman of opening genex’al session . . . Westinghouse 
Bcstg. Co. appoints Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove ad agency, 
Pittsbui’gh, effective April 1. 

Ahlgrinxm promoted to sales mgr. of KPRC-TV,* Houston 
. . . Frank Crane, mgr. of Los Angeles Ad Club, named 
managing director of Southern California Broadcasters 
Assn. . . . Charles L. Brady, ex-McIntosh & Inglis, Wash- 
iixgton consulting engineers, named director of technical 
opex’ations at WJIM-TV & WJIM, Lansing, Mich., not 
WILS-TV, as we erroneously reported last week . . . Rich- 
ard B. McEntire, ex-Securities & Exchange Comr. and one- 
time chaix-man of Kansas Corpox-ation Comixxission, joins 
Washington law firm of Dow, Lohnes & Albertson . . . 
Howard Linn Edsall, ex-adv. dix-ector of RCA tube div., 
named exec. v.p. of Fred Wittner Adv., N. Y. . . . Derrick 
Dyatt, ex-WTOP-TV, Washington, sets up own TV man- 
ageiixent consultant office at 3811 Van Ness St. NW, Wash- 
ington . . . George Hart joins Bentley & Co., Chicago, 
specializing in electronics accounts . . . Joseph R. Mat- 
thews, A. C. Nielsen Co. westex’n sales mgr., named v.p. in 
charge of sales of Nielsen Station Index to stations, 
agencies & sponsors, moves from San Francisco to Chicago 
. . . G. F. Brickenden named Halifax TV dix-ector for Cana- 
dian Bcstg. Corp. . . . Robert Mandeville, ex-Chicago, 
named eastern sales v.p. of rep Everett-McKinney. 



WSLS-TV, Roanoke, Va. (Ch. 10), breaks ground this 
month for $1,000,000 TV center in heart of city shopping 
district. Two-story structure will have glass wall permit- 
ting passersby to view directly into 2 downstairs studios. 
Novel featixre of building will be 6 lax’ge merchandising 
show windows to promote sponsors’ products. Building 
also will house complete art and photographic studios. 
Station recently increased power, now radiates 296 kw 
from mountain peak nearly 4000 ft. above sea level. 

TV-Radio News Directors Assn, sponsors second an- 
nual national TV news seminar May 18-21 at Northwest- 
ern U, Evanston, 111. Reservations for confex-ence, 
i-estricted to 40 participants, may be made at Northwest- 
ern’s Medill School of Journalism. 



10 - 



NstWOrk Accounts: Another program coup was pulled 

off bj' NBC this week with transfer of Lux Video Theatre 
and Lux Radio Theatre from CBS thru J. Walter Thomp- 
son in deal representing estimated $4,000,000 in gross an- 
nual revenue. TV version will be presented Thu. 10-11 
p.m. starting Aug. 26, replacing Martin Kane and Foreign 
Intrigue, which will be shifted to other times; radio ver- 
sion will start in Sept., time and date not yet selected . . . 
These 7 sponsors reported signed up for partic. on upcom- 
ing women’s series. Home, on NBC-TV starting March 1, 
Mon.-thru-Fri. 11 a. m. -noon: Lees Carpet Co., Helena 
Rubenstein, Sunbeam Corp. (appliances), Wear-Ever Baby 
Carriage Co., Dow Corning Corp., Corn Products Refining 
Co., Sherwin-Williams Paint Co.; network had no comment 
but plans to disclose full sponsorship list next week . . . 
Procter & Gamble moves Three Steps to Heaven from 
11:15-11:30 a.m. to 10:45-11 on NBC-TV, effective March 
1, w'hen Home moves into 11 a.m.-noon position . . . Chester- 
fields. in first major sponsorship since dropping Arthur 
Godfrey, buys Spike Jones Show on NBC-TV starting Feb. 
13, Sat. 8-8:30 p.m., thru Cunningham & Walsh . . . Bor- 
den’s coffee to sponsor Jtistice, drama series based on 
files of National Legal Aid Assn., on NBC-TV starting 
April 8, Thu. 8:30-9 p.m., thru Doherty, Clifford, Steers & 
Shenfield . . . Gerber Products (baby foods) to sponsor 
Thu. 10:15-10:30 a.m. segment of Ding Dong School on 
NBC-TV starting March 4, Mon.-thru-Fri. 10-10:30 a.m., 
thru D’Arcy Adv. . . . Campbell Soup Co. to sponsor Thu. 
5:45-6 p.m. segment of Howdy Doody on NBC-TV starting 
March 25, Mon.-thru-Fri. 5:30-6 p.m., thru Ward Whee- 
lock, Philadelphia . . . General Mills (O-Cel-0 sponge prod- 
ucts) buys 13 partic. on Dave Garroway’s 7-9 a.m. Today 
on NBC-TV, thru Comstock & Co., Buffalo; Maytag Co. 
buys 52 partic., thru McCann-Erickson; Tetley Tea Co. 13 
partic., thru Geyer Adv.; Florida Citrus Commission 8 
partic., thru J. Walter Thompson; Bourjois Inc. (per- 
fumes) 12 partic., thru Foote, Cone & Belding; Merrill 
Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane 1 partic., thru Albert 
Frank-Guenther Law Inc.; West Coast Lumbermen’s 
Assoc. 1 partic., thru MacWilkins, Cole & Weber, Portland, 
Ore. . . . ABC starts simulcast of Don McNeill’s Breakfast 
Club Feb. 22 9-10 a.m., with no TV sponsors signed as yet. 



Buffalo Ch. 2 grant to Niagara Frontier Amusement 
Corp. appears assured, now that FCC’s own broadcast 
bureau has told Commission that applicant had “no vdll- 
ful intent to subvert or circumvent Commission policy” 
in signing agreement \vhereby Enterprise Transmission 
Inc. dismissed competing application (Vol. 10:5). Deal 
involved Niagara’s payment of $491,833 for assets of 
WBES-TV, Buffalo (Ch. 59), principals of which were 
associated with Enterprise, and WBES-TV was to go off 
air. Broadcast bureau held that Niagara didn’t violate 
“any clearly established Commission policy or rules,” 
and that in previous cases “the Commission has not 
frowned upon payment by the remaining applicant to the 
withdrawing applicant in excess of ‘out-of-pocket’ expense 
or the value of assets received as an aspect of the 
resolution of conflict between the two applicants.” Bureau 
also noted that Enterprise and its associates won’t get 
paid anyway, because agreement was conditioned on grant 
to Niagara on or before Dec. 18. 

Commercial TV is slated to begin in Morocco March 1 
from station in Casablanca privately owned by Compagnie 
Marocaine de Radio-Television and using French 819-line 
system. The 4 hours of progi-amming daily will be split 
into 2 hours French (live and kinescope from French sta- 
tions), 1 Arabic, 1 English. English programming will be 
aimed at U. S. personnel in area, and reportedly will con- 
sist of ABC-TV films. 



Color Trends & Briefs: Color TV experts still have a 
lot to learn about color transcriptions and color film, but 
problems are well on way to solution. That’s conclusion 
reached by NTSC Panel 11-A which this week released 
200-page report on subject compiled by its members after 
10,000 man-hours of work over 2-year period. 

Evaluating highly technical study, chairman Dr. Al- 
fred N. Goldsmith said: 

(1) Acceptable color-film records and color release 
prints of live programs can now be produced by direct 
photography and be transmitted successfully. 

(2) “Color kinescope-recording information now avail- 
able is insufficient to enable firm conclusions to be drawn 
as to the commercial practicability of this process. How- 
ever, progress in this field is rapid and the ultimate 
successful utilization of color kinescope-recording is a 
definite possibility.” 

(3) “The color transcription art is rapidly developing 
in all its branches, and should enable the successful re- 
cording, transmission and reception of transcribed pro- 
grams in the foreseeable future.” 

Copies are available to everyone interested, from 
NTSC chairman Dr. W. R. G. Baker, Electronics Park, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

* * * * 

More color clinics for servicemen were disclosed this 
week. Raytheon announced following schedule : Fargo, 
N. D., Feb. 16; Minneapolis, Feb. 18; Lexington, Ky., Feb. 
23; Ft. Wayne, Feb. 25; Wilkes-Barre, March 2; Pitts- 
burgh, March 4; San Francisco, March 9; Fresno, March 
10. GE began series of service clinics for midwestern 
dealers Feb. 8 at Iowa State College, Ames. Motorola next 
week inaugurates “color school” in Chicago for distributor 
service managers, to continue until all distributors have 
had their personnel complete 3-week course. 

Disc-type color converter for compatible system, dem- 
onstrated last week by young engineer of Airtronics Re- 
search Inc., Bethesda, Md. (Vol. 10:6), has sparked a lot 
of queries, including some from manufacturers interested 
in evaluating possible market for device. Company is 
now making more refined model, aiming to reduce flicker, 
improve brightness. FCC has been invited to see device 
in action for Armstrong Circle Theatre Feb. 23. 

Color TV Inc., one-time proponent of line-sequential 
system, pops up again, this time with a proposal for one- 
tube color camera. Brochure is available from J. M. 
Carter, gen. mgr., 973 E. San Carlos Ave., San Carlos, Cal. 

Latest DuMont color scanner shipments are one each 
to Crosley and Corning Glass. 

■ 

One of last big share-time AM combinations — Prairie 
Farmer’s WLS & ABC’s WENR, Chicago — will be merged 
into one full-time operation, subject to FCC approval. 
Agreement provides for new corporation, WLS Inc., to 
operate using present WLS studios and personnel and 
WLS call letters, with ABC affiliation. Three directors 
will be named by old WLS ownership, 2 by WENR. 
Current WLS pres. James E. Edwards will head new 
firm. Complex tax-free financial agreement provides that 
each station assigns to new company its assets used in 
operation of station together with $100,000 in cash, with 
ABC contributing $40,000 additional because it is assign- 
ing less property to new company. Each of old com- 
panies will lend new firm $50,000. For 5 years, new 
WLS will hold 10,000 shares of Class A stock, ABC 8000 
shares of Class B ; after 5 years. Class B stock will be 
cancelled and each company will hold 10,000 shares of 
Class A. ABC’s Chicago TV outlet, WBKB, isn’t in- 
volved in transaction. 




GOOD NONOCHRONE SALES, COLOR EFFECT MINOR: Trade generally continued to hold up well 
this week — and pre-Christmas fear of "color talk" depressing black-&-white sales 
hasn't amounted to much, largely due to industry planning, pricing and promoting. 



A concomitant of current good market is that the once-anticipated headlong 
plunge into color race hasn't materialized and manufacturers are now holding off 
producing 15-in. color sets and preparing for 19-in. (see p. 5). It has been shown 
that public will buy black-&-white if price is right, thereby giving breathing spell 
to manufacturers to develop size of color set they believe public will want. 

I There were blind spots in bright trade picture , to be sure, particularly in 

highly-saturated older metropolitan markets. RETMA spokesman said business in Feb. 
i was beginning to show "just a little wear and tear around the edges" as compared to 
Jan. but was still doing better than anticipated and could certainly be classified 
j as good, as Februaries go. Doubtless very low prices were biggest single stimulant. 
Zenith, Motorola & Crosley this week introduced even lower-priced models (pp. 12-13). 

Further indication of good business was Corning Glass Works' recall of some 
500 workers at its tube plants in Corning, N.Y. and Albion, Mich, Corning said in- 
creased activity resulted from reduction of high inventories in TV customer plants. 

♦ ♦ * ♦ 

Color hit big N.Y. dept, stores with a bang this week — Macy's, Gimbel's and 
Wanamaker's all heralding demonstration of color receivers with big newspaper ads. 
For its 6th annual TV-Music Festival, Macy's took 6 pages in N.Y. Times. Ad told 
consumers precisely what salesmen later told them in stores — "black-&-white is 
your best buy." This was the pitch: 

Color sets now have 12^/^-in. pictures , compared to up to 27-in. black-&-white ; 
colorcasts average less than 2 hours a week, as against 7 channels telecasting all 
day and most of night; while black-&-white programs can be received on color sets, 
conversely the few color programs can be received in monochrome ; color sets cost 
from S700 to $1200 , compared to 21-in. monochrome under $200; delivery on color will 
I be between 3-6 months, compared to immediate delivery on nearly all black-&-whites ; 

1 service & warranty on color cost about 4 times black-&-white and only a few tech- 

j nicians are trained; only a few cabinet styles are available in color. 

I Result was foregone conclusion . Folks looked at color, bought black-&-white. 

j John Mellon , mgr. of Wanamaker's TV-radio dept., tersely and aptly summarized public 

I reaction for us thus; "Prices too high, pictures too small, deliveries too slow." 

He said black-&-white sales were excellent, took order for one color set , a Westing- 
house. Much the same reaction came from W m. Wexler . mgr. of Macy's TV-radio dept. 
Color sets at Macy's bore these price tags, which Wexler emphasized were estimates 
in some cases, and clearly labeled as such; 

CBS-Columbia $1200, Emerson $700, Halllcraf ters $1200, Hyde Park (Macy's pri- 
vate brand assembled by Tele King) $989, RCA $1000, Sparton $1150, Stewart-Warner 
$1000, Westinghouse $1295. Service & warranty charges ranged from $200-300 . Average 
delivery time was 3 months, though Westinghouse, which is channeling all its sets 
to N.Y. through distributor Times Appliance Co., announced it could make immediate 
deliveries to dealers of the comparatively few sets it has produced. 

West coast dealers got another look at color this week at the Western Winter 
Home Goods Market in San Francisco, along with opinion of J.B. Elliott, RCA exec, 
v.p. for consumer products, that " fear of color inroads into black-&-white has died 
down much more rapidly than I expected it to." He predicted 100,000 color sets in 
use in 1954 and 10,000,000 in 5 years, when price will be around $500. 

Color was big feature of mart , retailers evincing considerable enthusiasm 
over colorcast of Fred Allen's Judge For Yourself on KRON-TV. Consensus of dealers 

i 



11 



12 - 



was that color would sell when screen sizes reach 17-ln. and prices drop sharply. 

Actual buying; at mart was comparatively light , though traffic was heavy. Set 
makers had lots of appointments with dealers, however, and were plied with queries, 
chiefly about color and chiefly unanswerable. Dealers seeking special promotional 
allowances on black-&-white abounded, trying to extend shrinking profits. 

* * * * 

TV production continues to maintain steady pace , totaling 107,853 week ended 
Feb. 5, compared to 110,156 preceding week and 111,188 week ended Jan. 22. It was 
year's 5th week by RETMA calculations, brought production for year to date to about 
530,000, as against 893,161 for first 5 weeks of 1953. 

Radio production totaled 192,523 week of Feb. 5 , compared to 202,837 units 
in Jan. 29 week and 215,976 week before. It brought 5-week production to approxi- 
mately 1,060,000 vs. 1,390,114 year ago. 

Continuing its 1953 recapitulations , RETMA this week reported 6,375,279 TVs 
were sold at retail last year, compared with 6,144,988 in 1952. Production last 
year was 7,214,787 and in 1952 it was 6,096,279. No official retail sales figures 
were tabulated for 1950, when TV output set record of 7,463,800. 



Topics & Trends of TV Trade: Crosley made big pitch 

for second-set market this week with a “semi-portable” 
17-in. table model with only 15 tubes and selling at new 
low of $140, as against the $180 set it replaces. Crosley 
then announced it would concentrate its entire production 
on this model, dubbed “Super V,” through April in effort 
to make big penetration into second-set market. Company 
spokesman said production would be more than 2000 daily. 

Gerald 0. Kaye, Crosley New York distributor, or- 
dered 10,000 of the sets immediately after introduction 
at Waldorf-Astoria. It was largest single distributor 
order on any one TV model, said Crosley v.p.-gen. mgr. 
Leonard F. Cramer, who predicted new set “conceivably” 
could boost Crosley to 5th place among top TV makers 
“within a year.” 

Cramer added new receiver was designed to fit in with 
color set, which he said will be kept in living room in 
most cases because of its size. He emphasized set is 
“definitely not a loss leader” but will bring “modest px’ofits” 
to manufacturer, distributor & dealer. 

Receiver uses 17-in. rectangular picture tube and 
is housed in cabinet 14x18x19, has vertical chassis and 
side panel controls. It weighs 53 pounds (compared to 
76 for average 17-in. table), sells for $140 in walnut, 
$150 in mahogany, $160 in blonde. Optional uhf tuner 
is $30 extra. 

* ^ 4c 

Picture and receiving tube sales in 1953 both broke 
records established in 1952, reports RETMA. Picture tube 
sales totaled 9,389,138 valued at $234,721,038, up from 
7,635,666 worth $170,652,078 in 1952. Trend to larger 
tube sizes is reflected in compilation showing 75% were 
19-in. and larger, as against 60% in 1952. For December, 
sales were 644,287 worth $14,798,364. 

Receiving tube sales in 1953 totaled 437,091,555 valued 
at $303,675,313, compared with 1952’s 368,519,243 units 
worth $259,116,089. Of sales, 293,601,162 went for new 
sets, 112,785,183 replacement, 20,614,075 export, 10,091,135 
govt. For December, sales were 23,404,026 worth 
$17,832,387. 

TV helps piano sales, too, by interesting more persons 
in music and inducing them to play an instrument them- 
selves, according to Charles Steinway, of big Steinway & 
Sons, N. Y, 

Excise lax collections on TVs, radios & phonographs 
totaled $57,224,000 for July-Dee. 1953, down $10,331,000 
from same period of 1952. 



Distributor Notes: Motorola appoints new C. T. Nys- 
trom Co., San Diego, headed by Clarence Nystrom, ex-gen. 
mgr. of Kierulff & Co., Motorola San Francisco outlet . . . 
Westinghouse appoints Jones-Sylar Supply Co., Chatta- 
nooga (Don Jones, pres.) . . . Bendix Radio names Cal 
Lado Distributor Inc., Tampa, Fla. (Cal Lado, pres.) . . . 
Meek TV appoints Wille Electric Supply Co., Modesto, 
Cal.; Burge Electrical Supply, West Palm Beach, Fla.; 
P&W Electric Supply Co., Columbus, Ga.; Goldenwest 
Specialty, Wilder, Ida.; Rockford Wholesale Supply, Rock- 
ford, 111.; Midstates Appliance & Supply Co., Springfield, 
III. . . . Admiral promotes Carl Lantz from sales mgr. to 
gen. mgr. of San Diego distribution div., succeeding 
Michael J. Nicolin, now gen mgr. of Houston div. . . . 
Interstate Supply Co., St. Louis (RCA Victor) promotes 
George Meyer to sales mgr., replacing Nelson Foehner, 
resigned . . . Seattle Radio Supply Inc., Seattle (Capehart- 
Farnsworth) appoints Robert Reeves as gen. mgr., re- 
placing James K. Dooley, resigned . . . Legum Distributing 
Co., Washington (Crosley-Bendix) appoints Arthur Bon- 
ner district sales mgr. . . . Emerson Radio of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, announces resignation of Ben Neutra as 
TV-radio sales mgr. . . . Graybar names L. A. Shaw mgr. 
of Rocky Mount, N. C. branch . . . Hoffman Radio appoints 
Tel-Electric Distributors, 734 No. Division, Spokane, re- 
placing Prudential Distributors, now RCA . . . Canadian 
Admiral Sales names Guy Bell as Montreal branch mgr. 

GE called special news conference this week to deny 
reports it was lagging badly in TV sales, arising from 
week’s layoff of 2150 workers at Syracuse & Auburn, N. Y. 
(Vol. 10:6). George P. Park, mgr. of adv. & sales promo- 
tion services, said Jan. TV-radio sales had declined only 
slightly from Jan. 1953. He said that inventories were in 
much better position, however. He attributed “slight de- 
cline” in TV sales to “reluctance on the part of the public 
to invest in black-&-w'hite TV sets because they are led to 
think color TV is coming sooner than it appears to be.” 
Also this week, GE introduced 21-in. mahogany table 
model at $260, uhf $300. 

RETMA boards and 21 committees will meet at New 
York’s Roosevelt Hotel Feb. 16-18 to hear report by pres. 
Glen McDaniel on proposed amendments to tax and labor 
laws and recent administrative regulations on military 
electronics procurement. Another feature will be discus- 
sion by set div. exec, committee on possibilities of promot- 
ing uhf. Committees will meet first 2 days, with board 
meeting final day. 



13 



Trade Personals: Julius Haber, RCA victor director 

of public relations since Nov. 1952, appointed director of 
community relations, reporting to exec. v.p. Charles M. 
Odorizzi . . . Kenneth F. Petersen, ex-WPIX & WABD, 
appointed marketing mgr. of DuMont’s new TV transmit- 
ter dept., repox'ting to sales mgr. James B. Tharpe; C. J. 
Harrison promoted to sales mgr. of new mobile communi- 
cations dept., reporting to operations director Fred M. 
Link . . . E. A. Holsten resigns as Motorola gen. merchan- 
dising mgr. to form Motorola distributorship in Richmond, 
Va., replacing Sampson Distributing Co.; Holsten’s duties 
will be absorbed by merchandising staff . . . Robert Finch, 
ex-Avco sales finance mgr., named Capehart-Farnsworth 
mgr. of distributor & dealer financing . . . Dr. James M. 
Lafferty, GE color tube scientist and holder of 16 elec- 
tronics patents, named Fellow of IRE at banquet Feb. 8 
. . . J. Gerald Mayer, senior partner in Washington law 
firm of Mayer, Rigby & Seeley, elected exec. v.p. of Mica- 
mold Radio Corp., Brooldyn, N. Y. (capacitors) . . . Walter 
S. Holmes Jr. elected RCA controller; he had been acting 
controller since resignation of Ronello B. Lewis in Nov. 
1953 . . . Harry Hanson, ex-RCA Victor Ltd., named Ca- 
nadian Admiral chief designer . . . Albert J. Rosebraugh 
promoted to sales v.p. of Philco refrigeration div. . . . 
Vernon A. Kamin, ex-Zenith, named DuMont north central 
regional sales mgr., succeeding Albert C. Allen, now oper- 
ating own distributorship in Providence . . . Michael D. 
Kelly. Hallicrafters TV sales mgr., adds duties of radio 
sales mgr. formerly held by W. J. Halligan Jr., who con- 
tinues as communications equipment sales mgr. . . . J. H. 
Davidson, ex-IT&T, named CBS-Columbia eastern sales 
mgr., reporting to sales director David J. Hopkins; Wm. 

D. Randolph appointed southeastern district mgr. . . . John 
L. Clark, ex-Remco Inc., Chicago (Sylvania), named Spar- 
ton midwest sales mgr., replacing Lloyd de Young, now 
southeast sales mgr. . . . T. Jackson named gen. mgr. of 
General Instrument’s Danielson, Conn, plant, replacing 
R. L. Klabin, transferred to Elizabeth, N. J. plant . . . John 

E. Gillin, from Syracuse staff, named GE Cincinnati dis- 
trict mgr., replacing Joseph F. EflBnger, now color receiver 
sales mgr. . . . J. R. Clemens named adv. mgr.. Westing- 
house electric appliance div. . . . Norman C. Theobald 
named Meek TV southern California district mgr., Lee 
Jensen north central mgr. . . . Thomas J. Merson elected 
v.p., Gene Gold named adv. director, of Audio & Video 
Products Corp., N. Y. . . . Herbert E. Delp, ex-Emerson, 
named CBS-Columbia Kansas City district mgr. 



Zenith cut 17-in. sets below $200 as leaders of 19-set 
line introduced this week to distributors in Chicago. De- 
tails: Colby, 17-in. mahogany wood table $180; Stafford, 
17-in. blonde wood table $190; Kensington, 21-in. mahog- 
any table $200; Carlton, 21-in. blonde table $210; Am- 
herst, 21-in. mahogany pyroxylin table $230; Bowdoin, 
21-in. blonde pyroxylin table $240; Bradford, 21-in. ma- 
hogany table $240; Balfour, 21-in. blonde table $250; 
Buckingham, 21-in. mahogany table $300; Purdue, 21-in. 
blonde table $310; Westminster, 21-in. open-face mahogany 
console $280; Oberlin, 21-in. open blonde console $300; 
Sheldon, 21-in. open mahogany $300; Fordham, 21-in. 
open blonde $320; Cornell, 21-in. open mahogany veneer 
$360; Knox, 21 -in. open blonde veneer $380; Dartmouth, 
21-in. open mahogany veneer $400; Tulane, 21-in. open 
mahogany $400; Lawrence, 24-in. open mahogany $400. 
Optional uhf tuner is $30-50 extra. Also introduced was 
portable automatic phonograph listing at $100. 

Zenith’s motion to file counter-claim for $16,055,549 
triple damages against RCA in patent infringement suit 
brought against Zenith by RCA (Vol. 10:3), was granted 
Feb. 11 by Chicago Federal District Judge Michael L. 
Igoe. No date was set for hearing claim. 



Financial & Trade Notes: CBS earnings set record in 
1953, chairman Wm. S. Paley told directors meeting this 
week, but said audited figures won’t be revealed until 
next month. He said earnings were about $3.75 a share, 
or $1 more than in calendar 1952, when earnings were 
$6,445,506 on gross revenues of $251,594,490. CBS earn- 
ings in 1951 were $6,360,097 ($3.10) on gross revenues of 
$192,384,608. Last available financial report from CBS, 
covering 9 months ended Sept. 30, 1953, listed profit of 
$5,661,343 ($2.42) on sales of $223,109,649. All CBS 
operating divs. are included. Charles F. Stromeyer, new 
pres, of tube div. CBS-Hytron, was elected to board, re- 
placing Frederick L. Chapman, resigned. Stromeyer was 
also elected CBS corporate v.p., as was Dr. Peter C. Gold- 
mark, new pres, of CBS Laboratories. 

Sonotone Corp., makers of hearing aids, tubes and 
picture tube guns along with line of military electronics 
products, reported 1953 net income slightly in excess of 
1952’s $464,000 but pres. Irving A. Schachtel told N. Y. 
Society of Security Analysts that decline in TV com- 
ponents business and “disruption of market” following 
introduction of color TV kept earnings below Sonotone’s 
earlier estimates. He said sales in 1953 set record; de- 
tailed figures will be released later. 

Dividends: Philco, 40^ payable March 12 to stockhold- 
ers of record Feb. 26; Storer Broadcasting Co., additional 
37%^ March 13 to holders March 1, plus regular 6%^ 
Class B March 13 to holders March 1; CBS, 40^ quarterly 
A&B March 5 to holders Feb. 19; Television-Electronics 
Fund, 7^ Feb. 26 to holders Feb. 11; I-T-E Circuit Breaker 
Co., 31%^ March 5 to holders Feb. 18. 



Tele King Corp., 601 West 26th St., N. Y., manufac- 
turer of own and private label TV lines, this week filed 
petition under Chapter XI of N. Y. Bankruptcy Act, offer- 
ing creditors 100% settlement in annual installments of 
10%. Referee Herbert Lowenthal permitted Tele King to 
remain in business pending settlement after exec. v.p. 
Calvin E. Bell said net profit of $25,000 a month could be 
realized by continuance. He estimated sales at $750,000 a 
month, operating expenses of $110,000. Attorney Benja- 
min Weintraub said Tele King had $3,337,000 in inven- 
tories last July in anticipation of fall season that never 
fully developed, lost about $200,000 last year on its 18 dis- 
tributing subsidiaries and lost all defense contracts last 
July. Though no schedules were filed, petition approxi- 
mates assets at $4,439,000, liabilities at $4,050,000. Ten 
largest creditors, who will meet with Lowenthal Feb. 15, 
are: GE, $584,501; RCA, $375,000; Westinghouse, $93,198; 
Sylvania, $84,859; Thomas Electronics Inc., Passaic, N. J. 
(tubes), $81,727; Tung-Sol, $75,456; Waterbury Com- 
panies Inc., Waterbury, Conn, (plastics), $37,407; Foster 
Transformer Co., Cincinnati, $35,158; Red Lion Furniture 
Co., Red Lion, Pa. (TV cabinets), $31,721; Sessions Clock 
Co., Forestville, Conn., $30,036. 

Don Ferraro’s 3 companies — Fidelity Tube Corp., Gem 
Radio & Jewel Radio, all of 900 Passaic Ave., Newark — 
were adjudged bankrupt this week when they were unable 
to submit Chapter XI plans satisfactory to creditors. 
Referee Wm. T. Cahill ordered adjudication after Asst. 
U. S. Attorney James C. Pitney pressed tax claims of 
more than $1,000,000 against the 3 firms, which listed 
$1,114,880 liabilities and $537,962 assets in late Dec. hear- 
ing (Vol. 10:1). 

Motorola cut prices further this week, introducing 
17-in. ebony metal table model at $160 (uhf $180) and 
21 -in. ebony metal table at $180 (uhf $200), available for 
March delivery. It was competitive move, bringing Mo- 
torola into line with Admiral and Philco, which previously 
introduced vhf and all-channel sets at those prices. 



14 



C OUNTY-BY-COUNTY survey of set ownership, con- 
ducted for CBS-TV by Nielsen and hailed by CBS-TV 
research director Oscar Katz as “most extensive” ever 
made, will be issued within next 2 weeks. 

Claims appear justified because survey was compiled 
by sampling 100,000 families directly, covering every one 
of nation’s 3070 counties. As a preliminary, CBS this 
week issued state-by-state tabulation (see below). Census 
is as of Nov. 1, 1953, showing 58% of nation’s families 
— 27,506,500 out of 47,191,500— had TV sets as of that 
date. Interesting angle is that NBC’s estimate as of same 
date shows 26,364,000 sets in use (Vol. 9:51). CBS’s uhf 
count was 1,774,690. Because uhf is so relatively new 
and percentage of uhf sales and conversions has acceler- 
ated since survey was made, uhf figures should be em- 



ployed with caution. 

Commenting on survey, CBS said: “Aside from the 
industry’s evident need for up-to-date, accurate figures, 
the new survey was made because in the 6-month period 
between May, 1953 [when CBS last issued a projection, 
not a survey] and November, the number of station mar- 
kets had doubled, TV counties had increased by almost 
50%, and uhf had its real beginning.” Following are 



the state-by-state figures: 



State 

Alabama — 

Arizona 

Arkansas — 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Dllnols 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New Tork 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total 



Total 


TV 


Pene- 


Families 


Families 


tratlon 


824,700 


280,470 


34% 


253,100 


107,570 


43 


535,500 


102,020 


19 


4,029,500 


2,809,640 


70 


456,100 


196,790 


43 


630,300 


479,210 


76 


101,600 


75,110 


74 


246,900 


197,710 


80 


968,800 


337,350 


35 


955,500 


389,720 


41 


180,100 


24,820 


14 


2,828,700 


1,862,390 


66 


1,294,700 


799,700 


62 


826,700 


399,770 


48 


662,400 


212,600 


32 


830,100 


354,110 


43 


790,100 


278,770 


35 


260,000 


67,970 


26 


732,600 


588,650 


80 


1,424,300 


1,109,610 


78 


2,023,500 


1,417,930 


70 


900,000 


437,020 


49 


587,400 


119,370 


20 


1,306,300 


677,160 


52 


197,700 


9,100 


5 


427,300 


177,410 


42 


60,600 


11,930 


20 


162,600 


84,690 


52 


1,568,100 


1,374,790 


88 


202,000 


43,770 


22 


4,800,100 


3,712,620 


77 


1,056,400 


395,960 


37 


161,200 


13,320 


8 


2,517,800 


1,957,490 


78 


692,300 


312,040 


45 


546,500 


132,320 


24 


3,102,200 


2,276,640 


73 


243,800 


217,720 


89 


554,600 


194,410 


35 


189,000 


17,890 


9 


915,900 


381,190 


42 


2,412,800 


1,068,520 


44 


207,600 


120,320 


58 


108,500 


25,930 


24 


919,100 


510,970 


56 


828,800 


387,060 


47 


529,600 


229,320 


43 


1,045,000 


518,880 


50 


93,100 


6,750 


7 


47,191,500 


27,506,500 


58% 



NCAA football TV aim for 1954: Show as many new 
teams as possible. Harvey Cassill, U of Washington ath- 
letic director, named chairman of NCAA TV committee 
Feb. 9, proclaimed No. 1 objective of this year’s program 
“to spread TV participation among as many member col- 
leges as possible.” Other goals: Reduction of adverse 
effects of TV on football attendance, and development 



Fee’s license fee proposal has begun to draw com- 
ments already, though they’re not due until April 1. (For 
full text of proposal, see Special Report, Jan. 30). Right 
off the bat. Sen. Edwin Johnson (D-Colo.) told Commis- 
sion he doesn’t like idea, said it’s Congress’ job to deter- 
mine fees to be charged, if any. He introduced bill 
calling for establishment of “nominal” fees, said he hopes 
for Senate hearings on it in near future, asked FCC to 
hold off meanwhile. He wants it made clear that stations 
shouldn’t feel they have “proprietary interest” in wave- 
lengths because they pay fees, and he questioned fairness 
of levying same charge for all TV-AM-FM stations. Rep. 
Aspinall (D-Colo.) introduced same bill in House. West 
coast attorney Joseph Brenner, speaking for himself, told 
FCC that no fees should be charged but, if they are, 
some system should be devised whereby Commission can 
resume holding hearings outside Washington, with parties 
paying FCC costs incurred. He also suggested that fees 
be on sliding scale directly proportional to cost of station 
as estimated by applicant, e.g., $500 for $500,000, $200 for 
$200,000 station, $50 for $50,000. 

“Emmy” awards for 1953 announced Feb. 12 by Acad- 
emy of TV Arts & Sciences at Hollywood banquet: top 
stars. Eve Arden of Our Miss Brooks (CBS) & Donald 
O’Connor of Colgate Comedy Hour (NBC) ; outstanding 
personality, Edward R. Murrow (CBS) ; comedy show, 
7 Love Lucy (CBS) ; variety. Omnibus (CBS) ; mystery. 
Dragnet (NBC) ; news or sports. See It Now (CBS) ; 
public affairs. Victory at Sea (NBC) ; new program. Make 
Room for Daddy (ABC) & TJ. S. Steel Hour (ABC), tie; 
children’s, Kukla, Fran & Ollie (NBC) ; supporting actor. 
Art Carney of Jackie Gleason Show (CBS) ; supporting 
actress, Vivian Vance, 7 Love Lucy (CBS) ; drama, V. S. 
Steel Hour (ABC) ; quiz or panel. This Is Your Life 
(NBC) & What's My Line? (CBS). 

Program logs in newspapers are paid for by 13% of 
TV & radio stations either by exchange of time for space 
or by direct payment at regular newspaper rates, reports 
NARTB on basis of survey. Of the 13%, one-fourth are 
newspaper-owned. Report said 27% of all stations had 
been requested to pay but that 14% refused, using direct 
mail, broadcasting program schedules, etc. Report pointed 
out that newspapers have substantially increased income 
from pages on which logs appear by selling small ads 
to stations and sponsors. 

Long delays in getting CAA clearance for TV towers 
are inherent in proposal to be considered Feb. 16 by 
Washington Airspace Subcommittee. On agenda for next 
meeting is request by Air Force that all proposals for 
towers higher than 500 ft. be submitted to Washington 
Airspace Subcommittee for approval, in addition to re- 
gional subcommittees which now have jurisdiction. Meas- 
ure is given little chance of passage, one similar proposal 
having been voted down in the past. 

Channel shifts and power increases: WTTV, Bloom- 
ington, Ind. has moved from Ch. 10 to 4, now radiates 
100-kw ERP from new 1000-ft. tower at new site 26 mi. 
from Indianapolis. WJBF-TV, Augusta, Ga. (Ch. 6) Feb. 
12 raised power from 23.8 to 100 kw. WTOP-TV, Wash- 
ington (Ch. 9) last week went from 27.3 to 55 kw with 
new antenna, extending tower from 300 to 373 ft. 

Eight-channel community distribution system will be 
demonstrated March 12-13 at Buck Hill Falls, Pa., by 



of ways and means to use TV to promote college football. Spencer-Kennedy Labs. System receives all New York 

Asa S. Bushnell, Eastern College Athletic Conference channels plus WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, has been operating 



commissioner was named TV program director for third 9 months. 



successive year. 

Canadian Govt, has appropriated $23,644,450 for 
CBC’s TV-radio operations for fiscal year beginning July 
1. Appropriation for current fiscal year was $8,634,368. 



Radio now reaches 98.1% of all homes, reports A. C. 
Nielsen Co. on basis of new survey showing 46,646,000 
radio homes in U. S. as of Jan. 1 — increase of 1,890,000 
in 1953. 



MARTIN COREL’S 

AUTHORITATIVE NEWS SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



: J Reports 



Wi 



fh Electronics 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY RABID WEWrBBREKB^WYHPBlBir • WRSHIIIBION 5. D.C. • TELEPHONE SIERLIMG 3 1755 • VOL. 10: No. 0 

L'^..u\lLiii Ljb » FEB ^ : February 20, 1954 



In ihitt 
imsue: 



f FCC Considers Ban on Low-Power UHF, page 1 
More Experience With Color Receiver, page 2 
, Week's Grants Include 3 VHF CPs, 1 UHF, page 3 

Dr. Eisenhower's Hopes For Educational TV, page 4 
Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 5 



Color Trends and Briefs, page 7 
Credit and Debit Sides of the Trade Ledger, page S 
Price Wars Bring Interference Worries, page 9 
RETMA Breakdown of 19S3 Dealer Shipments, page 10 
Congress to Examine Status of TV-Radio, page 12 



FCC CONSIDERS BAN ON LOW-POWER UHF: Several proposals to help insure future of uhf 
are in works at FCC — all based on trial balloons hoisted by Comr. George Sterling 
at Boston IRE meeting last month (Vol. 10:5). 

Plan which might ban use of 1-kw transmitters by future uhf starters is get- 
ting most serious consideration at the moment. It's subject of concentrated study 
at staff level — and what will eventually come of it is still in guessing stage . 
Like castor oil, it's a f or-your-own-good measure, for such a proposal is almost 
certain to arouse plenty of opposition from grantees and equipment makers. In his 
Boston speech. Sterling put it this way; 

" I am not sure but what the FCC would be doing uhf a favor if it suspended 
authorizing any more 1-kw uhf transmitters." 



FCC staff is now investigating the need for this action, and how it could be 
accomplished. Sterling says he hopes it will come up on the Commission agenda "within 
a couple of weeks." 

Minimum pe r missible power under FCC rules is geared to tower height and the 
population of principal city served — the same minimums applying to both vhf and 
uhf. For example ; With a 400-ft. tower, station serving city of less than 50,000 
population is permitted to radiate as little as 3-kw ; for cities 250,000-1,000,000, 
about 16-kw (which can be accomplished with 1-kw transmitter) ; cities 1,000,000 and 
over, 80-kw. Minimum ERF decreases as antenna height increases . Commission has 
also been authorizing stations to start with less than these minimums if their sig- 
nal strength is of certain level over principal service area. 

These rules would have to be, changed , probably by setting up separate mini- 
mums, or entirely different power-height curves, for uhf and for vhf. 

Those at Commission who feel such a change is desirable argue that: (1) In 
many cases, signal from 1-kw transmitter doesn't seem to be "getting out" enough for 
easy reception by today's relatively insensitive uhf receivers . (2) Lower-powered 
transmitters may have been necessary at first, but equipment situation now is con- 
stantly improving — GE has 12-kw transmitter, DuMont has 5-kw, and RCA, DuMont, 
Federal and others soon will be making 12-kw uhf transmitters. 



Any proposals to increase minimum transmitter powers would have to go through 
rule-making procedures, giving interested parties time for comments, etc. 



* * ♦ * 

Another of Sterling's proposals — relaxation of restrictions on directional 
transmitting antennas — is due to get informal discussion at next FCC meeting, al- 
though no one has yet petitioned Commission to change or waive these rules. 

Perhaps the most unusual plan suggested by the Commissioner is the licensing 
of satellites and/or boo s ters to expand service areas of uhf stations (Vol. 10:7). 
Sterling came out in favor of waiving restrictions against commercialization of ex- 
perimental boosters "in the interest of uhf broadcasters who want to go to the ex- 



COPYRIGHT 1064 BY RADIO NEWS BUREAU 



2 



pense." This week he told us the Commission may soon begin considering the pending 
petitions for boosters and satellites. 

Commission is still getting plenty of complaints from uhf telecasters — most 
of them aimed at affiliation policies of the networks. Comr. Sterling says he's 
particularly disturbed by some recent charges of " discrimination" against uhf by the 
networks — and adds that these are causing him to "lose a little bit of interest in 
the multiple ownership proposal." 

Chairman Hyde, on other hand , says multiple ownership plan could be aid to 
uhf, by giving networks bigger stake in uhf's success . He says complaints from uhf 
grantees to his office haven't increased in recent weeks. 

Commissioners have received some requests to hold general conference on uhf 
problems. But they figure that their forthcoming second survey of post-freeze sta- 
tion's economics and network relations — due some time this spring — will tell the 
story better. Meanwhile, at the staff level, FCC is making " spot checks " of some 
vhf-uhf markets. Pittsburgh was first city visited; next is exploration of situa- 
tion in Norfo lk area, v/nere there are 3 uhf stations and 1 vhf. 

MORE EXPERIENCE WITH COLOR RECEIVER: We reported our initial reactions to color set 
in the home a month ago (Vol. 10:4), can now pass on to you benefits of our addi- 
tional experience since that time. 

In terms of hours of color viewing , our experience is still limited. How- 
ever, we have had a fair variety of program types, more layman reactions, more op- 
portunity to tune and detune receiver. 

From technical standpoint , our original reactions still hold; The RCA set is 
remarkably stable , relatively simple to tune, requires minimum of servicing. The 
color fidelity has remained at generally high level , and black-&-white reception on 
receiver remains quite satisfactory. 

Average viewer still hankers for larger screen . Though we'd like brighter 
picture for daytime shows, present brightness level is quite adequate for night- 
time viewing. Quite a few observers say that black-&-white picture on color set is 
"easy on the eyes" — but we'd prefer more light. 

* *\ * 

From subje c tive standpoint of what color adds to programs, we've learned 
quite a bit. We watched Howdy Doody 4 times, and we submit that no amount of color 
will ever make it comprehensible or palatable to an adult. Furthermore, we doubt 
that children's feverish enthusiasm for program could be increased by anything. 

Panel programs don't gain much from color , either. Meet the Press was little 
enhanced; color didn't add great deal to interview parts of Fred Allen's Judge for 
Yourself, but song productions were at times strikingly beautiful. 

But the importance of c ol or to commercials can't be overemphasized, regard- 
less whether program content itself benefits greatly from color. Impact on viewer 
is tremendous, many times greater than black-&-white for many products. This single 
factor is a m ajor a n swer to those critics of color TV who point out that movies have 
not converted wholly to color in the years color film has been available. There's 
no question about it, sponsors will insist on color as color audience grows. 

There was exc e £ti onal treat this week in Camel News Caravan Feb. 16, showing 
color news film for first time. There was excellent documentary on Chinese activity 
on Formosa, plus good fashion shots of models vacationing in Florida. Though latter 
v/as a bit washed out, colors were exactly right as described by fashion commentator. 

Film employed was 16mm Kodachrome , combination of commercial and daylight 
types; prints were duplicates of original, accounting for the slight reduction in 
saturation. Projector was fast pull-down. NBC-TV color film specialist Stan Parian 
said cardinal rule for making color TV film is simply this; "Get all the quality 
you can on the film, and the electronic equipment will reproduce it faithfully." 

Women performers ought to be mighty happy with color ; the arts of the beau- 
tician and the dressmaker finally come i'pto their own in TV. 

We haven't had opportunity to watcli- CBS-TV s Fri. evening programs, but the 



3 



observers from Variety, Billboard, N.Y. Times, etc., seem quite disappointed with 
output of CBS's field-sequential camera and coder device. 

* * *1 

Some engrossing; color programs are in the works , particularly after NBC gets 
mobile unit back in service next month and after color-conscious pres. Pat Weaver 
returns from Hawaiian vacation. 

Plenty of sports are on tap at NBC , including big-league baseball. CBS is 
aiming as far ahead as next New Year's Day, planning on the Orange Bowl game from 
Miami. Meanwhile, here's current schedule, always subject to some change; 

NBC-TV — A rmstrong Circle Theatre Feb. 23, 9:30-10; Excursion Feb. 28, 
4-4:30; Ding Dong School March 8-9, 10-10:30 a.m. ; Taming of the Shrew (opera) 

March 13, 4-5:30; Name That Tune March 15, 8-8:30; On Your Account March 19, 4:30-5; 
Three Steps to Heaven March 22-23, 10:45-11 a.m. ; Eddie Fisher March 31, 7:30-7:45. 
Tentatively scheduled are St. Patrick's Day parade March 17, Easter parade and 
Frontiers of Faith April 18, plus Gillette fights sometime in April. 

CBS-TV — New Revu e, 5:30-6 every Friday, up to now carried in New York and 
Baltimore only, was due to go to Chicago Feb. 19, to Los Angeles Feb. 26. A' few 
other cities, such as Youngstown and Minneapolis, have been getting show recently 
on "unguaranteed" AT&T circuits — meaning program may or may not come through in 
color, because unconverted coaxial is sometimes used and microwave isn't equipped 
and monitored for color. Paul Tripp's Party , due March 2, is for New York only. 

AT&T now ha s 2 circuits to west coast equipped for color, thus can handle 
2 programs simultaneously. There's still no word from ABC or DuMont on specific 
plans for start of color programming. 

WEEK'S GRANTS INCLUDE 3 VHF CPs, 1 UHF: There were 4 new CPs and an initial decision 

this week, but no new stations on air — though 6 are imminent, may begin testing 
next week. Following are this week's grants: 

Modesto, Cal ., KTRB, Ch. 14; W. Palm Beach, Fla ., WEAT, Ch. 12; Wilmington 
(Carolina Beach), N.C., Wilmington TV Corp. , Ch. 3; Clarksburg, W.Va ., WBLK, Ch. 12. 
Initial decision favored Ch. 2 grant in Buffalo to Niagara Frontier Amusement Co., 
examiner Harold Shilz deciding applicant didn't try to subvert FCC policy in its 
efforts to get dismissal of competing applicants (Vol. 10:7). 

New stations due next week ; Duluth, Minn . , WDSM-TV, Ch. 6; Manchester, N.H ., 
WMUR-TV, Ch. 9; Schenectady, N.Y . , WTRI, Ch. 35; Wilmington, N.C .. WMFD-TV, Ch. 6; 
Pittsburgh, Pa ., WQED (educational), Ch. 13; San Juan, P.R ., WAPA-TV, Ch. 4. 

* * * * 

One hot uhf-vhf decision was reaffirmed by FCC this week, despite fiery op- 
position from Sen. Johnson. FCC had granted special temporary authorization to 
WORD-TV, Spartanburg, N.C., to operate at site 6 mi. from Greenville instead of 
site specified in CP, 24 mi. from Greenville (Vol. 10:6). 

A protest of "economic injury " was filed by CP-holder WSCV, Spartanburg 
(Ch. 17). Commission rejected protest, saying that WSCV's main argument was that 
WORD-TV wanted new site in order to get CBS-TV affiliation which WSCV hadn't been 
able to get. WSCV didn't prove. Commission said, that WORD-TV's different site 
had any effect on WSCV's chances of getting the CBS-TV affiliation. It termed the 
allegations of economic injury "conjectural and speculative." 

Another case had unusual twist this week . Grantee WPRO-TV, Providence, R.I. 
(Ch. 12), which was stopped from going on air by protest of CP-holder WNET (Ch. 16), 
asked Commission to stop WNET from going on, arguing that WNET hadn't been diligent 
in constructing until it stymied WPRO-TV. 

Among other actions , FCC this week; (1) Rejected Westinghouse ' s request for 
reconsideration of rule that directors' minor holdings in stations be counted under 
multiple ownership rule (Vol. 10:7). (2) Rejected petitions requesting reversal of 

the recent allocation of Ch. 6 to Whitefish Bay, Wis. and Ch. 13 to Bemidji, Minn. 

(3) Asked grantees WWLA, Lancaster, Pa. (Ch. 21) and WERE -T V, Cleveland, 0 . (Ch. 65) 
to give better reasons for not having begun construction. (4) Set March 19 for the 
start of Ch. 7 hearing for Wausau, Wis. and Ch. 7 for Omaha, Neb. 



i 



- 4 - 



DR. EISENHOWER'S HOPES FOR EDUCATIONAL TV: " Don't give up on educational television . 
We're had a rough start but give us time. We're just now beginning to learn some 
of the economic facts about the cost of construction and operation of the stations. 
We're filling a real educational gap and to do it right we've got to have time to 
finance the stations and time to fulfill our responsibility." 

Thus did Dr. Milton Eisenhower reassert his faith in educational TV this week 
in interview. Brother of the President and himself president of Penn State College, 
Dr. Eisenhower was one of educational TV's staunch early backers , is co-chairman of 
National Citizens Committee for Educational TV. He told us 15 months ago he thought 
educators would do far better in TV than in radio (Vol. 8:46), now insists they're 
making good progress despite slow start of 3 stations on air, 27 CPs, 17 applications. 

It's only fair to give educators more time than commercial applicants, said 
Dr. Eisenhower, because many of them must go to skeptical, economy-minded state 
legislatures, others must raise fvinds through private foundations. 

" I have no preference for one type of financing ," he declared. "I believe we 
should use any and all methods which allow us a completely free hand in the choice 
of programs. I don't believe there's any danger in state-controlled TV just because 
a legislature appropriates money for it. We accept money from the government for 
research in medicine, agriculture and industry. So why should we fear dictation by 
politicians because they're assisting us in this thrilling educational venture?" 

There's no conflict between commercial and educational stations, he believes. 
"There's a job to be done here which commercial TV cannot do, should not do and 
could not be expected to do — and we would not want them to do it . Personally, I'm 
enthusiastic about both commercial and educational TV," he said. 

He believes educa t ional station in small town can survive as well as station 
in large city with vast cultural resources. But small-town educational applicants 
have better chance if they're hooked to state network , as proposed in Wisconsin. To 
illustrate, he pointed to his own State College, allocated Ch. 44 as one of 4 author- 
ized for Pennsylvania, others being Philadelphia's Ch. 35, Pittsburgh's Ch. 13 and 
Erie's Ch. 41. He said he hoped 2 more channels would be allocated in smaller towns 
and all 6 be linked in network, giving smaller stations better programming. 

* 

Joint Committee on Educational TV held stock-taking session this week at con- 
vention of National Assn, of School Administrators in Atlantic City — and naturally 
found itself thinking more of future than boasting of past. 

Biggest event of future will be joint dedication of 5 stations May 16. They 
are WQED, Pittsburgh (Ch. 13) ; WCET, Cincinnati (Ch. 48) ; KETC, St. Louis (Ch. 9) ; 
WHA-TV, Madison, Wis . (Ch. 21) ; KQED, San Francisco (Ch. 9). WQED is scheduled to 
run test patterns Tue. Feb. 23 to become nation's 4th educational outlet, joining 
KUHT, Houston (Ch. 8), KTHE, Los Angeles (Ch. 28) and WKAR-TV, E. Lansing (Ch. 60), 
latter operating non-commercially on commercial channel. Testing dates of other 
four stations are still indefinite, though all say they'll meet dedication date. 

JCET'S Ralph Steetle says he's encouraged by formation of local committees 
in states which have submitted no educational application. Among them are North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho 
end Oregon. Both he and Robert Mullen, exec, director of Dr. Eisenhower's National 
Citizens Committee for Educational TV, have been concentrating their promotional 
fire in those areas recently and report encouraging progress. 

Further encouragement came recently from New York , where Gov. Dewey asked 
state legislature to authorize operation of state's 10 non-commercial stations by 
"responsible" non-profit groups under general supervision of State Board of Regents 
(Vol. 10:6). Leaders who date educational TV's lag from Dewey's rejection last year 
of proposal for a state-financed network (Vol. 9:9-10) are encouraged by latest action 
but don't necessarily believe it represents basic shift in Dewey's attitude. 

Talk of the future to one side , educators' record to date isn't impressive. 
KTHE and WKAR-TV, both uhf, are proceeding very slowly with programming. Former 
faces extremely rough going, up against 7 vhf commercial stations , but licensee 



Allan Hancock Foundation declares it's willing to spend a lot of time and oil money 
to make station go. It's too early to evaluate WKAR-TV, on air only a month. 

KUHT, educational TV's "pioneer" station , programming since last May, is hav- 
ing its troubles, too, judging from reports. New York Times recently reported sta- 
tion was having trouble raising enough money to continue beyond current school year, 
and Houston Independent School District, though a joint licensee with U of Houston, 
has been reluctant to assist in presenting programs. Story further reported KUHT's 
program ratings were very low compared to educational programs on commercial KPRC-TV. 

U of Houston has increased TV courses from 8 to 9, with psychology most pop- 
ular. Yet school officials expressed disappointment that of the few thousand who 
view psychology program, only about 250 actually signed up for course or purchased 
teaching materials. Thus only small fraction of audience were "revenue" students. 



N otable activity is reported by Canada’s pri- 
vately owned TV grantees, anxious to get on air and, 
in most cases, provide first TV service to their areas. 
There are now 15 outstanding grants for Canadian sta- 
tions, of which 13 are privately owned — in addition to the 
8 stations now on air (5 CBC, 3 privately owned). Latest 
private station to go on air, CKCO-TV, Kitchener, Ont. 
(Ch. 13), Canadian GE equipped, has been transmitting 
test pattern and music since Dec. 24 (Vol. 10:5), gets CBC 
network interconnection Feb. 21, stax’ts studio program- 
ming March 1. Next Canadian station due to start is 
privately owned CHSJ-TV, St. John, N. B. (Ch. 4), plan- 
ning debut next month. RCA this week reported ship- 
ment of 10-kw transmitter to CHCH-TV, Hamilton, Ont. 
(Ch. 11), which has April target date. 

4; 9)c :f: si: 

These progress reports were received this week from 
grantees of Canadian stations: 

CFAC-TV, Calgary, Alta. (Ch. 2), now negotiating for 
equipment, begins construction of studio-transmitter build- 
ing and 670-ft. tower as soon as frost lifts in March or 
April, hopes to begin tests about Sept., goes commercial 
about Oct. 1, reports mgr. A. M. Cairns. Rep will be 
All-Canada Television. 

CFCM-TV, Quebec City (Ch. 4), delayed by severe win- 
ter, now plans May start with 500-watt DuMont transmit- 
ter in suburban Ste. Foye, according to gen. mgr. Henri 
Lepage. It’s jointly owned by Famous Players Canadian 
Corp. and AM stations CHRC, CJQC, CKCV. Famous 
Players also owns 50 (c of CKCO-TV, Kitchener, which 
begins commercial operation Feb. 21. Reps are Weed (for 
U. S.) and Jos. A. Hardy & Co. 

CBWT, Winnipeg, Man. (Ch. 4), CBC’s outlet there, 
now plans test pattern in early May, programming later 
same month. It takes delivery on RCA 10-kw transmitter 
in March or April, will radiate 60 kw from 240-ft. tower. 

CJCB-TV, Sydney, N. S. (Ch. 4) has ordered 10-kw 
RCA transmitter for April-May delivei’y, plans July tests 
using 300-ft. RCA tower on 225-ft. elevation, goes com- 
mercial in Aug., according to pres. J. W. Nathanson. Reps 
will be Weed (for U. S.) & All-Canada Television. 

CFQC-TV, Saskatoon, Sask. (Ch. 8), now negotiating 
for equipment & tower, has begun adding TV facilities to 
present radio studios, plans tests in Aug. or early Sept., 
goes commercial Oct. 1, reports mgr. V. Dallin. Tentative 
base rate is $200. Reps will be Adam Young (for U. S.) 
& Radio Representatives Ltd. 

CKLW-TV, Windsor-Detroit (Ch. 9), planning July 
start, has ordered 24-kw RCA transmitter for May deliv- 
ery, will be 1st Canadian station to start with maximum 
325-kw visual power, according to pres. J. E. Campeau. 
Its 650-ft. RCA tower will be on Detroit River waterfront 
where $1,250,000 studio-tower construction project is al- 
ready underway. Reps will be Adam Young (for U. S.) & 
All-Canada Television. 



In contrast to bustling activity in the north, reports 
from U. S. grantees this week were sparse, and shipments 
of equipment to upcoming stations were sparser. Only 
one reported was GE 12-bay antenna to WSLI-TV, Jack- 
son, Miss. (Ch. 12), due on air next month. GE also re- 
ports order for 5-kw transmitter and 12-bay antenna for 
KGVO-TV, Missoula, Mont. (Ch. 13) for delivery in 60 
days. Station hopes to be on air in June. For stations 
already on air, GE shipped 12-kw amplifier to KCCC-TV, 
Sacramento, Cal. (Ch. 40) and 5-bay helical uhf antenna 
to WJMR-TV, New Orleans (Ch.61). 

These were the reports received this week from up- 
coming U. S. stations: 

WMUR-TV, Manchester, N. H. (Ch. 9), delayed by se- 
vere winter weather, now plans March 14 progi-amming 
using 10-kw RCA transmitter and former FM tower atop 
1500-ft. Mt. Uncanoonuc, according to chief engineer 
Charles Halle. It will be first TV in state, is owned by 
ex-Gov. Francis P. Murphy. Base rate will be $250. Weed 
will be rep. WMTW (Ch. 8) super-coverage outlet with 
transmitter atop Mt. Washington, N. H., and studios in 
Poland, Me., is due next July. WKNE-TV, Keene (Ch. 45) 
state’s other grantee, hasn’t ordered equipment or an- 
nounced plans. 

WNLC-TV, New London, Conn. (Ch. 26), now has 
“late 1954” target, has ordered RCA equipment, 420-ft. 
Stainless tower, writes mgr. Gerald J. Morey. Class A 
hour will be $150. Headley-Reed will be rep. 

WLAP-TV, Lexington, Ky. (Ch. 27), granted last 
Dec. to Gilmore & J. Lindsay Nunn, announces “indefinite 
postponement of construction” in printed brochure dis- 
tributed to public. Brouchure notes station has already 
spent more than $100,000, that it had arranged for pri- 
mary CBS-TV affiliation with AT&T interconnection but 
that it believes uhf today is unacceptable today as an 
“area-wide system.” Booklet adds: “When and if, in the 
next few months, the uhf picture improves, or this area 
is granted a vhf channel, we will reactivate our plans 
and proceed in confidence [but] we would rather be a 
live casualty than a dead hero.” 

WOPA-TV, Chicago (Ch. 44), gi’anted Feb. 10, hasn’t 
ordered equipment or begun construction, but plans to 
start Jan. 1, 1955, according to gen. mgr. Egmont Sonder- 
ling. Rep not yet chosen. 

WKNY-TV, Kingston, N. Y. (Ch. 66), has postponed 
late Feb. target date because of weather delays, according 
to TV operations mgr. Robert L. Sabin, is now indefinite as 
to start. Outside construction of studio-transmitter build- 
ing has been completed. Installation of 1-kw RCA trans- 
mitter awaits some interior finishing. Its 600-ft. Stainless 
tower has now been built up past half-way mark at Port 
Ewen site, 3 mi. from Kingston and 10 mi. from Pough- 
keepsie. Owner .Joseph K. Close also has CP for Keene, 
N. H., which hasn’t ordered equipment or set target date. 
Hour rate will be $100. Rep will be Meeker. 



Telecasting Notes: TV’s cost-per-thousand continues to 
drop despite addition of new stations. Figures released by 
NBC research director Hugh M. Beville Jr. tell story in 
terms of cost-per-thousand TV homes on full NBC-TV 
network: from $12.39 in March 1948 to $2.92 in Jan. 1954. 
NBC-TV’s gross hourly rate for full network was $2550 in 
March 1948 when there were 206,000 TV homes; had this 
increased in direct proportion to increase in number of 
TV homes, 1954 rate would have been $339,150 for nation- 
wide coverage, instead of actual rate of $79,885, Beville 
points out . . . “Triple exposure” plan, to be inaugurated 
March 2 by ABC-TV, marks first network entry into repeti- 
tive programming; ABC-TV’s top-talent live mystery 
drama. The Mask, Sun. 8-9 p.m., will also be offered Tue. 
& Wed., 8-9 p.m., on film, re-runs being programs origi- 
nally presented live in previous weeks, substantially cut- 
ting talent & production costs and filling holes in ABC-TV 
evening schedules . . . Shift of Lux Video Theatre & Lux 
Radio Theatre from CBS to NBC (Vol. 10:7) may be “only 
the beginning” of big NBC offensive under pres. Pat 
Weaver, says Feb. 17 Variety, speculating that “the net- 
work will next train its guns and strategy on effecting the 
switchover of other names and properties from its major 
CBS competition” and quoting “reliable reports” that 
Toast of the Town's Ed Sullivan is “target No. 1 on the 
NBC agenda” . . . Billy Rose, who bought TV time to plug 
his Broadway musical Kismet, tried new twist for his con- 
troversial play The Immoralist, which opened Feb. 8 be- 
fore unenthusiastic newspaper critics; he bought mid- 
night-12 :15 a.m. segment on WNBT for entire week to 



Personal Notes: Frederic W. Wile Jr., NBC-TV network 
program v.p. in Hollsnvood, takes on added responsibility 
for all west coast radio activities . . . James A. Stabile 
promoted to director of new ABC business affairs dept., 
in charge of negotiating contracts affecting all network TV 
& radio programs . . . E. J. Rosenberg, exec. v.p. of pack- 
ager Transamerican Broadcasting & Television Corp., 
named DuMont Network sales development director . . . 
Mitchell F. Stanley, ex-WWON (AM), Woonsocket, R. I., 
named mgr. of WFMJ-TV & WFMJ, Youngstown, 0. . . . 
John H. Norton Jr., ex-ABC v.p. now gen. mgr. of upcom- 
ing WMTW, Poland, Me., elected v.p. of licensee Mt. Wash- 
ington TV Inc. . . . John Pival, TV mgr., elected v.p. for 
TV, Harold S. Christian, radio commercial mgr., elected 
radio v.p., WXYZ-TV & WXYZ, Detroit; Ralph Dawson 
promoted to TV sales director, Harold L. Neal to radio 
sales mgr. . . . Dick Campbell, station mgr. of KOTV, 
Tulsa, takes over added duties of commercial mgr. John B. 
Hill, resigned; Robert Freeland promoted to promotion & 
publicity director . . . Brown Morris named station mgr. 
of upcoming KTEN, Ada, Okla. (Ch. 10), due in May or 
June; Nadine Mullinax named program mgr., Fred Smith 
chief engineer . . . Wm. H. Hansher, ex-Graybar, named 
chief engineer of WTVN, Columbus, 0. . . . Nathan D. 
Golden, director of Commerce Dept.’s scientific, motion 
picture & photographic products div., receives Silver Medal 
Meritorious Service Award from Secy. Weeks for out- 
standing achievement . . . Charles E. Jackson promoted to 
local sales mgr. of KFMB-TV, San Diego . . . Gary 
Vorhees, ex-WTAR-TV, Norfolk, named production di- 
rector of WTRF-TV, Wheeling, W. Va. . . . James H. 
Butts, ex-KBTV, Denver, appointed operations supervisor 
of KOA-TV . . . Wm. Anderson, ex-WOR-TV, named pub- 
licity mgr. of WNBT & WNBC, reporting to new publicity 
director Bob Blake . . . Harvey Wick appointed director of 
film operations, WFTV, Duluth . . . Vernon W’ebster named 
sales mgr. of WICA-TV, Ashtabula, 0.; Donald Fassett, 
business mgr.; Frank Bernato, chief engineer . . . Randall 
E. Larson, ex-KRON-TV, San Francisco, named program 
mgr. of Bakersfield’s KBAK-TV & KBAK, formerly 



present panel discussions about the play by show business 
personalities, critics, psychologists, etc.; the telecasts got 
more acclaim from critics than did play itself . . . TV 
rights to complete literary works of Ring Lardner have 
been acquired by Eugene Solow & Brewster Morgan for 
Authors Playhouse, series of 39 filmed dramas slated for 
completion by Sept.; Solow & Brewster also have signed 
deals for some works by John Steinbeck, John Hersey, 
Lloyd C. Douglas and Ben Ames Williams, with $1,200,000 
backing by Chemical National Bank of N. Y. ... 4 theatre- 
owned TV stations now booking TV films through Amalga- 
mated Buying Service, N. Y. & New Haven theatrical film 
purchasing agency headed by Lew Ginsburg . . . Educa- 
tional telecasts, to be viewed in schools as part of regular 
classroom routine, will be initiated in Canada next Nov. by 
CBC on trial basis . . . Mardi Gras celebrations to be tele- 
cast from New Orleans by NBC-TV, 11:45-12:30 p.m. 
March 2 & midnight-1 a.m. March 3 . . . KTEN, Ada, Okla. 
(Ch. 10), which asked aid of advertising agencies in set- 
ting its rates (Vol. 9:52), got response from 36 out of 
100 queried, suggested rates averaging $261 for Class A 
hour, $50 for min.; because of prospective set circulation 
increase, KTEN, which plans to begin programming 
in May or June, set rates at $300 & $55 for hour & min. 
. . . KOAT-TV, Albuquerque, cuts Class A hour from $250 
to $160, min. from $45 to $26 . . . KELO-TV, Sioux Falls, 
S. D. raises base hourly rate from $150 to $200, min. from 
$30 to $40 . . . KCMO-TV, Kansas City, becomes primary 
affiliate of DuMont, replacing KCTY, -which goes off air 
Feb. 28 (Vol. 10:7). 



KAFY-TV & KAFY . . . Del Leeson named mgr. of new 
promotion, planning & development dept., KDYL-TV & 
KDYL, Salt Lake City . . . Everett Freedman, veteran top- 
flight movie scenarist, joins CBS-TV Hollywood in de- 
velopment of new properties . . . George G. Huntington 
promoted to ABC Radio sales development mgr. . . . Har- 
old W. Waddell, ex-WJW, named sales mgr. of NBC-owned 
WTAM, Cleveland, reporting to Wm. N. Davidson, sales 
director of WNBK & WTAM . . . George Wolf, Geyer TV- 
radio adv. director, elected v.p. . . . Robert C. Alexander 
promoted to TV-radio v.p.. Ward Wheelock Co., Philadel- 
phia . . . Robert Kirschbaum, ex-Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
named Grey Adv. TV-radio copy head . . . Robert W. Bloch 
named TV-radio director of Toy Guidance Council, plan- 
ning big spot campaign . . . Lloyd F. Christianson, pres, of 
Electronics Associates Inc., Long Branch, N. J., elected to 
board of WRTV, Asbury Park, N. J. . . . Jerry Dunphy 
named news director of WT'V’H-TV, Peoria. 

■ 

FCC’s FM functional music proposal (Vol. 10:1) drew 
.‘50-odd comments this week, mostly from FM stations, 
mostly laudatoi-y. Many liked FCC’s objective — to give 
FM stations some revenue — but urged that proposal go 
even further and permit stations to provide functional 
music, storecasting, transitcasting, etc. on simplex basis, 
thus eliminating need for purchasing multiplexing equip- 
ment. Some also proposed that FM stations be permitted 
to provide point-to-point service, too. Several comments 
brought up question of “piracy” of functional music sig- 
nals, asked FCC to try to stop it. Among the few 
opponents were those who have opposed transitcasting — 
CIO and the groups who took their opposition to Supreme 
Court and lost. A few mobile radio users argued that 
FM broadcasters weren’t making adequate use of fre- 
quencies and that a reallocation of 88-108 me FM band 
be made. Sole broadcaster opponent was Storer Bestg. 
Co. which visualized proposal pushing AM and TV into 
a “subscription” basis. 



7 



Color Trends & Briefs: RCA’s timetable for modify- 
ing TV stations’ RCA post-war transmitters and sideband 
filters for color without charge (Vol. 10:7) will coincide 
with stations’ plans for getting necessary additional studio 
terminal equipment and starting colorcasts. RCA aim is 
to coordinate station modification schedule with AT&T’s 
program of equipping its facilities to bring color to 
stations. 

Though RCA is shouldering cost of material and engi- 
neering supervision for modifying transmitters and side- 
band filters, stations must still stand cost of necessary 
additional equipment; our report of RCA’s announcement 
last week erred by implying that RCA is assuming whole 
burden of preparing stations for network color rebroad- 
casts. 

RCA has analyzed its post-war transmitters, found 
that all can be readily modified for color. By end of second 
quarter, it expects that all new transmitters will come 
olf production line already prepared for color. 

^ 

More color plans of manufacturers: GE plans to pro- 
duce set with 15-in. tube in early summer for field testing 
and dealer demonstrations only, to sell “over $1000.” By 
Dec. it hopes to have set with 19-in. tube, to sell between 
$800-$1000. CBS-Columbia announced it will begin pro- 
duction March 1 of 15-in. sets using tube made by CBS- 
Hytron. First sets will go to distributors after their 



servicemen complete 2-week factory color clinic. About 
10 color sets a day will be produced after March 1, said 
company officials, adding they’ll make 19-in. set “as soon 
as CBS-Hytron makes a tube.” Arvin will start sampling 
distributors with 15-in. set in March-April. Andrea in- 
troduced 15-in. set to distributors this week, plans “pro- 
duction in limited quantities during second or third quar- 
ter of this year.” 

A 24-in. Lawrence color tube, rectangular and metal- 
coned, is being demonstrated at west coast plant by Chro- 
matic TV Labs. Richard Hodgson, Chromatic pres., re- 
ports that it uses 18,000 volts, produces 30 ft. lamberts of 
brightness and 300 lines of vertical resolution. Hodgson 
says that experiments with all glass envelopes are planned 
and that order for bulbs has been placed with Corning. 
He hopes to show tube at forthcoming IRE convention in 
New York. Chromatic’s 2 licensees, Thomas Electronics 
and Crosley, continue work on Lawrence tube, have dis- 
tributed samples. National Video Corp., though experi- 
menting with tube (Vol. 10:7), is not a Chromatic licensee. 

Servicemen’s interest in color is enormous, as ex- 
emplified by attendance of 850 at Feb. 15-16 RCA Service 
Co. course in Washington’s Lisner Auditorium. Audience 
was extremely attentive, fearful of missing a word. Ad- 
miral this week started second color TV training school in 
Chicago for some 30 field engineers and distributor service- 
men, under national service mgr. Max Schinke. 



Network Accounts: CBS-TV’s long-awaited response 

to NBC-TV’s Today at 7-9 a.m. finally goes on air March 
15, though no sponsors have been announced yet. Titled 
The Morning Show, it will feature Walter Cronkite as 
counterpart of Today's Dave Garroway, has newsman 
Charles Collingwood and Bill & Cora Baird’s famed pup- 
pets. To compete with Garroway’s chimpanzee J. Fred 
Muggs, Morning Show will have “Humphrey, the Houn’ 
Dog,” a Baird puppet, as “disc doggie.” Originating from 
Studio 41 in Grand Central Terminal, show will be offered 
in 15-min. segments for national sponsorship, with 5-min. 
cutaways for local sponsors every half-hour . . . CBS-Co- 
lumbia signed this week as interim sponsor of Arthur God- 
frey and His Friends Wed. 8-9 p.m., alternating with Toni 
(home permanent) until summer, when latter takes over 
weekly; Nielsen ratings this week dropped Friends pro- 
gram from first 10 national programs first time in more 
than year . . . Ford Foundation’s Omnibus, sponsored by 
Kelvinator, Greyhound Bus Corp. & Scott Paper Co., goes 
off air as scheduled March 28 on CBS-TV Sun. 5-6:30 p.m.; 
to replace it, sustainer Adventure will be expanded from 
4:30-5 to 5:30 and Eric Sevareid’s The American Week 
moves in from 6:30-6 as sustainer, remaining 6-6:30 p.m. 
open at present . . . Corn Products Refining Co. buys Mon. 
1:45-2 p.m. segment of Garry Moore Show on CBS-TV 
starting March 1, thru C. L. Miller Co. . . . GE planning 
to sponsor Ginger Rogers in dramatic series in place of 
Fred Waring Show and GE Theatre on CBS-TV starting 
in fall. Sun. 9-9:30 p.m., thru BBDO . . . General Foods 
Corp. (Baker’s coconut) buys 8 partic. on Dave Garroway’s 
Today on NBC-TV 7-9 a.m.; thru Young & Rubicam; 
Reardon Co., St. Louis (Bondex cement paint) 17 partic., 
thru Krupnick & Assoc.; Murine Co. (eye drops) 5 partic., 
thru BBDO, Chicago; Hathaway Mfg. Co. (curtain fabrics) 
8 partic., thru Fletcher D. Richards Inc. . . . Toni (perma- 
nent) and Quaker Oats, radio sponsors of Don McNeill’s 
Breakfast Club on ABC Mon.-thru-Fri. 9-10 a.m., relin- 
quish options for TV sponsorship when it goes simulcast 
Feb. 22 ; other radio sponsors. Swift’s and Philco, defer 
decision on TV . . . ABC-TV shifts 3 sustainers to Sundays: 
Answers for Americans, 1-1:30; Elmer Davis 3:30-3:45; 
Martin Agronsky’s At Issue 3 : 45 - 4 . 



Station Accounts: Already heavily in TV, breweries took 
even bigger plunge into sponsorships this week with ap- 
proach of spring. Budweiser Beer signs to sponsor all 77 
road games of St. Louis Cardinals on uhf WTVI, St. Louis- 
Belleville, 111., thru D’Arcy Adv.; Krueger’s Beer alternates 
with Carter Products on Cases of Eddie Drake on WCBS- 
TV starting Feb. 27, Sat. 7-7:30 p.m., thru Grey Adv.; 
G. Heileman’s Brewing Co. (Old Style lager beer) sponsors 
Hollywood Showcase on Chicago’s WNBQ starting Feb. 
20, Sat. 6-6:30 p.m., thru Leo Burnett; Arizona Brewing 
Co. buys Duffy’s Tavern for El Paso, Albuquerque, Las 
Vegas, Phoenix, Tucson, Yuma, San Diego & Roswell, 
N. M., thru Advertising Counselors of Arizona . . . Gorham 
Co. (silverware) makes first TV buy with All-Star Theatre 
in Kansas City and Atlanta starting in March, plans to 
expand to other cities shortly, thru Kenyon & Eckhardt 
. . . Armstrong Tire & Rubber Co. offers to sponsor Big 
Playback filmed series on 60-50 basis with its dealers in 
160 cities . . . Glidden Paints and DuMont TV dealers team 
up to sponsor TV-radio of 21 eastern Maine high school 
basketball tournaments on WABI-TV & WABI, Bangor . . . 
Mutual Assn, of Savings Banks sponsors cartoonist Roger 
Price and his “Droodles” on WABC-TV starting March 1, 
Mon.-thru-Fri. 7:10-7:15 p.m. . . . Bromo-Seltzer buys 
Janet Dean, Registered Nurse series in 20-30 markets, thru 
Lennen & Newell . . . Paper-Mate Pens to spend $1,600,000 
in TV-radio spots, in addition to proposed network pro- 
gram this fall, thru Foote, Cone & Belding . . . Packard 
Dealers of N. Y. to sponsor national indoor tennis cham- 
pionship finals Feb. 22 on WOR-TV 2-5 p.m., thru J. R. 
Pershall Co., Chicago . . . Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. 
buys Seems LAke Yesterday on WBAP-TV, Ft. Worth, thru 
Gardner Adv. . . . Among other advertisers using or pre- 
paring to use TV: Lanvin Parfums Inc., thru Cortland D. 
Ferguson; Lo-Calory Food Corp. (R.D.X. tablets), thru 
Harry B. Cohen Adv.; Babbitt Co. (Glim detergent), thru 
Harry B. Cohen; Manchester Hosiery Mills, thru Bahn 
Adv.; Eastern Wine Corp., thiu Ben B. Bliss & Co.; Tryne 
Co. (Hi-Q games), thru Drugstore Adv. Assoc.; Trix-Stix 
(games), thru Monroe Greenthal Co.; Kidd & Co., Ligonier, 
Ind. (Kidd’s marshmallow creme), thru L. W. Ramsey Co., 
Chicago. 



Trade Report 
February 20, 1954 



CREDIT AND DEBIT SIDES OF THE TRADE LEDGER: Despit e current good movement of sets , 
TV-radio makers are genuinely concerned about state of market. They communicated 
their anxiety quite freely this week at RETMA quarterly meetings in New York, giving 
these three problems top priority among their worries; 

(1) Low prices of TV sets . "Nobody can make money with 17-in. sets selling 
as low as |150 and 21-in. at $180," said one. "Where it will stop isn't for me to 
say but as long as my competition does it. I'll have to go along . But the market 
is good now and I don't think we have to cut prices like this to make a living." 

(2) Slow progress of uhf . Trade source estimated about 110,000 of 400,000 
sets now in factory inventory are uhf-equipped. Same source said uhf sales for the 
first half of 1954 probably will be no higher than 15 % of all TV sales, as con- 
trasted with expected 20-25% . Adding to manufacturers' concern is fact that uhf 
receivers sell for more than vhf-only receivers and profit margin is greater. 

(3) Lagging radio sales . Almost unnoticed by press, radio sales this year 
have been going down at a rate many set makers consider alarming . Through Feb. 12, 
factory sales of all radios, including auto, were estimated at 1,150,000 , compared 
to 1,600,000 for same period of 1953. Inventories of radios, excluding auto sets, 
stood at 3,000,000 at all levels Feb. 12, compared to 2,000,000 year ago. 

Crosley's new Super V 17-in. table selling at $140 (Vol. 10:7) gave set mak- 
ers cause for more anxiety than many would admit. There was plenty of head-shaking 
as to its effect, particularly as first reports from field indicated Crosley was 
reaping windfall in sales. Reports that some manufacturers were preparing to duplicate 
the Crosley action were persistent. In fact, Raytheon this week issued formal de- 
nial that it had $140 17-in. table model in works, for release in month or so. 

Radio problem was real stickler , one which has been building up since first 
of year. One reason was decline in auto production below 1953 's weekly pace of some 
100,000. This becomes important when one considers that 5,182,934 auto radios were 
turned out last year, out of total radio production of 13,368,556. But portable, 
clock and home sets are dragging, too. One official's comment : "Radio's an old man 
who's been on his feet a long time. Maybe he's just tired." 

^ ^ ^ ^ 

There were problems , to be sure, but fact is that Jan. retail sales probably 
will prove to be highest on record for that month when final figures are in, said 
RETMA spokesman, acknowledging that profit won't be nearly as big for all concerned. 

One comment is that industry "color truth" campaign had effect for first time 
in January. Folks realized that color at prices they could afford was long way off 
and decided their best bet was black-&-white . Bulk of January sales were in older 
markets and a large percentage were replacement sales, according to RETMlA.. 

Color's apparent minimal impact on black-&-white was a continuing source of 
gratification. In the fev; cities where color has been demonstrated, notably New 
York, public's curiosity but not its money was stirred. Customers weren't eager to 
buy color and dealers weren't eager to sell. Latter complain that with delivery 
dates uncertain and no satisfactory service plan available, they were inviting fu- 
ture headaches by selling current-sized models — even if they had buyers. 

Black-&-white trade seemed to be holding up well , showing little change in 
factory or distributor sales week ended Feb. 12 from preceding week, with inventory 
about 1,650,000 at all levels. Sylvania chairman Don G. Mitchell said inventory was 
actually too low , based on current rate of sales. He said industry was producing at 
rate of 6,000,000 a year but selling at rate of 7 , 500 , 000 . He predicted sales will 
improve in second quarter, reversing trend of nearly all prior years. 




8 



TV production maintained steady pace , totaling 107,702 week ended Feb. 12, 
compared to 107,853 preceding week, 110,156 week ended Jan. 29. It was year's 6th 
week in RETMA's statistical calendar and brought production for year to date to some 
637,000, compared to 1,079,261 for same period of 1953. 

Radio production totaled 190,207 , compared to 192,523 week ended Feb. 5 and 
202,837 week before. Radio output has thus shown decline in every week of 1954. It 
brought 6-week production to approximately 1,250,000 vs. 1,694,366 year ago. 

PRICE WARS RRING INTERFERENCE WORRIES: The highly competitive TV price situation is 
causing new concern over interference problems at both industry and FCC levels. 

Tendency to cut corners on safeguards against interference and radiation has 
been evident in some — but by no means all — of the new "price leader" sets built 
to sell for less than $200, we've been told by industry engineering sources. 

Issue was brought to a head this week when FCC Chairman Rosel Hyde sent wire 
to RETMA board, meeting in New York, urging industry to stick to its self-adopted 
"standard" intermediate frequency (IF) of 41 me — around which the Commission 
built its allocation plan for uhf stations. 

Telegram was "neither a threat nor a complaint ," Hyde told us, but a request 
for "appropriate action." He said he was concerned about reports that some new TV 
set models had reverted to old 21-mc IF. But he discounted rumors that FCC may go 
to Congress with request for special legislation if industry doesn't act. 

RETMA board authorized chairman Robert C. Sprague to "appoint a committee 
with broad powers to establish procedures and possible testing facilities, after 
consultation with FCC, so that set manufacturers can eliminate all possible sources 
of spurious omissions which cause interference with the reception of TV signals by 
other receivers." Committee will weigh all possible actions and attempt to develop 
effective industry-wide program for voluntary compliance. 

Chairman Hyde's wire gave more urgency to the problem which was already on 
RETMA board's agenda. The industry organization has long been concerned by slowness 
of some manufacturers to comply with the new standards — and lately has been wor- 
ried by an apparent tendency of some set makers, who had previously adopted the new 
41-mc IF, to backslide. RETMA's power to make manufacturers adhere to standards is 
as limited as FCC's. As a trade association, it can merely "suggest ." And neither 
does the Commission have any jurisdiction in this field. 

All of the top 10 set makers , and 15 minor ones, responded to RETMA poll last 
fall by saying they would use 41-mc IF in all of their sets by first of this year. 

But today's price situation apparently has altered some plans. Use of 41-mc 
IF involves more expense than old 21-mc. Said one industry source; "These days a 
lot of people are thinking in terms of saving 50d to $1 on a set, including a couple 
of the leading set manufacturers." 



TV-radio-appliance retail failures in 1953 totaled 348, 
compared to 210 in 1952, reported Dun & Bradstreet this 
week. Liabilities rose to $15,955,000 from $5,486,000 in 
1952. Rate of failures per 10,000 concerns was also 
greater last year — 116, compared to 70 preceding year. 
Business failures in Dun & Bradstreet tabulations include 
businesses that ceased operations following assignment or 
bankruptcy: ceased with loss to creditors after such ac- 
tions as execution, foi’eclosure or attachment; voluntarily 
withdrew; were involved in court actions as receivership, 
reorganization. Chapter XI arrangement or voluntarily 
compromised with creditors out of court. They don’t in- 
clude withdrawals due to changes in ownership and volun- 
tary liquidation in which there is no indication of loss to 
creditors. 

Admiral will build $1,000,000 warehouse in Leyden 
Township, III. to house TV & radio receivers, eliminating 
need for 7 separate warehouses in area. Due for comple- 
tion in Juno, it has 1 52,000-sfi. ft. of space. 

Licensed TV’ sets in Britain totaled 2,846,227 as of 
Nov. 30, increase of 119,157 during Nov. 



RETMA board took following actions at meeting this 
week in New York’s Roosevelt Hotel; (1) Adopted resolu- 
tion urging Congress to exempt color sets from excise tax 
in keeping with practice of exempting new products and 
industries. (2) Commended FCC for “diligence and speed” 
in processing TV station applications, approving NTSC 
color standards and facilitating development of uhf. (3) 
Authorized pres. Glen McDaniel to confer with officials of 
new electronics div. of Business & Defense Services Ad- 
ministration on ways of promoting industry-govt, co- 
operation. (4) Approved proposal to provide funds or 
equipment for educational TV research project at New 
Jersey State Teachers College, Montclair. 

Long-standing patent litigation between Zenith and 
RCA may get fii'st hearing in April, Delaware Federal 
District Judge Leahy indicates. Patent issues will be 
heard first. Judge Leahy having turned down plea by 
Zenith to give priority to anti-trust issues. Last week 
Chicago Federal Judge Igoe luled that hearing on new 
Zenith counter-claim against RCA (Vol. 10:3) would have 
to wait until Delaware case is disnosed of. 



10 - 



Topics & Trends of TV Trade: TV shipments to deal- 
ers totaled 6,656,555 last year, when production w’as 7,214,- 
787, according to RETMA’s cumulative state-by-state and 
county -by-county report I’eleased this week. It was well 
up from 6,174,505 sets sold to dealers in 1952, when pro- 
duction was 6,096,279, but fell short of record 1950, when 

7.068.000 were shipped and 7,463,800 were produced. De- 
cline in TV business last fall was reflected in the 695,308 
units shipped in Nov. compared to 756,855 in Nov. 1952 
and 656,175 sold in Dec. vs. 965,891 in Dec. 1952. Inven- 
tories at end of 1953 were about 1,850,000 compared to 

1.210.000 at beginning of year. New York led in ship- 
ments, with 595,293; Pennsylvania second, 548,845; Cali- 
fornia third, 514,512. Wyoming, still without station, 
trailed with 4058. [For state-by-state shipments of sets 
to dealers 1950-52, and first 10 months of 1953, see p. 335, 
TV Factbook No. 18.] Here’s state-by-state report for 
1953 (county-by-county tables available from RETMA 
upon request) : 
state 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois - 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine — 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota - 

Mississippi 

Missouri - — 

Montana — 



Distributor Notes: Shakeup in San Antonio disti’ibu- 
tion began this week with Zenith’s appointment of Joe 
Thiele Inc., replacing Perry Shankle Co. Latter report- 
edly will take over RCA Victor line March 1, when Straus- 
Frank Co. takes over Sylvania . . . Leo J. Meyberg Co., 
RCA San Francisco outlet, will sell Los Angeles and 
Fresno branches shortly, said pres. A1 Meyer . . . Sylvania 
appoints Merit Distributing Co., 1215 Henderson St., Co- 
lumbia, S. C.; York Supply Co., Cincinnati, replacing 
Peaslee-Gaulbert; Electronic Supply Inc., White River 
Junction, Vt. . . . Emerson appoints V’liolesale Appliances 

l nc. , 5220 Natural Bridge, St. Louis (John C. Cox Jr., 
pres.) . . . Meek TV appoints Wilner Sales Co., Muncie, 

l nd. ; Watham-Miller Co., Cedar Rapids; Electric Fixture 
& Supply Co., Salina, Kans.; Ellis Electric Co., Wichita; 
Davis Wholesale Drug Co., Baton Rouge; Clingan Electric 
Supply Co., Cumberland, Md.; Bremmeyr Bain Co., Petos- 
key, Mich.; Spors Co., Le Center, Minn. . . . Admiral Dis- 
tributors Inc., San Francisco, promotes H. R. Tamberg to 
gen. mgr., replacing John Barker, now with Hoffman Radio 
Sales Corp. . . . Boyd Distributing Co., Denver (Philco) 
promotes Wm. H. Pearce from TV sales mgr. to gen. mgr. 
. . . Raytheon Philadelphia factory branch names Larry 
Phister gen. mgr., replacing Harry S. Funk, resigned . . . 
Roth Appliance Distributors, Milwaukee (Strombei’g- 
Carlson) appoints Ray W. Horak sales mgr. . . . Strong, 
Carlisle & Hammond, Cleveland (Philco) announces resig- 
nation of TV-radio gen. mgr. Homer G. Frank, who’ll head 
Barclay’s Ltd., TV-radio-appliance store at Haverhill, 
Mass. . . . Bendix Radio and Cal Lado Distributors Inc., 
Tampa, Fla., cancel distribution agreement previously an- 
nounced . . . Motorola appoints Braid Electric Co., Nash- 
ville, ex-Zenith, replacing Currey’s Distributing Co. 



Trade Personals: Kenneth C. Meinken resigns as presi- 
dent of National Union Radio Corp. (tubes), his duties to 
be assumed by chairman C. Russell Feldmann; Meinken’s 
son, Kenneth C. Meinken Jr., resigned as National Union 
Radio v.p. & gen. sales mgr. only 3 weeks ago to become 
sales mgr. of Automatic Mfg. Corp., Newark (electronic 
components) . . . Ralph J. Cordiner, GE president, to be 
presented annual honor award for outstanding American- 
ism by Stevens Institute of Technology at banquet Feb. 
26; James L. Myers, chairman & pres, of Clevite Corp., 
will be given citation . . . B. F. Valliere elected General In- 
strument v.p.-gen. mgr., in charge plants at Chicopee, 
Mass., Danielson, Conn. & Joliet, 111. ... A. Brewer Hunt, 
Northern Electric Co. Ltd., Montreal, re-elected pres, of 
Canadian RTMA . . . John W. Christensen promoted to 
v.p. & chief engineer of CBS Laboratories . . . H. C. Edgar, 
ex-merchandising director, named export director of RCA 
International div.; Albert F. Watters, ex-RCA Victor per- 
sonnel v.p., promoted to director of associated company 
operations of international div. . . . Irwin C. Roll resigns 
as adv. & sales promotion mgr. of RCA Victor tube dept, 
to join Fuller & Smith & Ross agency on Westinghouse 
tube account . . . Donald Blackman, ex-Canadian GE, 
named Canadian Admiral regional sales mgr. in charge 
of Maritime Provinces, headquartering in Halifax . . . 
Cliff Knoble, ex-Eureka Williams Corp. and Ruthrauff 
& Ryan, named adv. mgr. of Raytheon TV-radio div. 
. . . C. Byron Farmer named southeastern regional sales 
mgr. for GE replacement tubes . . . B. J. Adkins named 
Capehart-Famsworth Kansas City regional sales mgr. 
. . . Richard C. Walker named northwestern regional 
mgr. of Westinghouse major appliances . . . Alfred 
Gartner, ex-Cornell-Dubilier, named sales mgr. of Mica- 
mold Radio Corp., Brooklyn (capacitors) . . . Elmore 
E. Kayser, ex-Sun Oil Co., named adv. & sales promo- 
tion mgr. of Krylon Inc., Philadelphia (TV towers) . . . 
Harold A. Jones promoted to exec. asst, to Eugene Goebel, 
national sales mgr. of Motorola Communications Elec- 
tronics Inc. . . . Carmine Masucci, ex-Sylvania, named 
senior project engineer of CBS-Columbia advanced devel- 
opment dept. . . . Bill Irvin, veteran TV-radio editor of 
Chicago Sun-Times, joins Admiral publicity dept. . . . J. A. 
Young, ex-Joske’s, San Antonio, named Olympic Radio 
southwestern district sales mgr. . . . Duke Wellington, ex- 
CBS-Columbia, resigns as national sales mgr. of Tele King, 
now operating under Chapter XI proceedings (Vol. 10:7) 
. . . Wm. H. Higgins resigns as Sparton field sales mgr. 
. . . Ralph C. Powell named product mgr. of American 
Screen Products Co., Miami (antennas) . . . George Kollar 
joins Finney Co., Cleveland (antennas) as special asst, to 
sales mgr. M. L. Finney Jr.; Victor Trebules promoted to 
plant supt. 



New officers of Record Industry Assn, of America: 
pres., James B. Conkling, Columbia Records, succeeding 
Milton Rackmil, Decca; v.p.’s, Dario Soria, Angel Records 
and Harry Kruse, London Records; treas., Frank Walker, 
MGM Records. Phonograph Manufacturers Assn, re-elects 
all officers for year: pres., Joseph Dworken, Dynavox; 
v.p., I. Rothman, B&R Electronics Co.; secy.-treas., Har- 
old Kraft, Kraft Bros. 

Canadian TV sales to dealers will total 446.250 this 
year, compared to actual sales of 365,000 in 1953, but 
radios will decline from 613,000 units sold last year to 
488,880 this year, according to estimates of 20 manufac- 
turers disclosed by Canadian RTMA at directors meeting 
this week in Montreal. New entry in Canadian TV market 
is Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., previously Emerson 
Dominion distributor, now making and marketing own line 
of 9 models produced in Toronto. Prices range from S230 
to $510, said consumer products v.p. H. C. Rindfleisch. 



Total 

96,592 

38.992 
50.777 

514,512 

71,456 

94,124 

15,685 

52,225 

137,402 

118,731 

26,301 

426,867 

229,601 

160,581 

104,642 

90.992 
103,197 

60,574 

79,219 

196,152 

264,703 

127,025 

48,043 

164,465 

11,652 



State 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico _ — 

New York 

North Carolina — 

North Dakota 

Ohio - 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 



West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming — 

Grand Total 



Total 
63,954 
11,483 
22,396 
180,112 
21,875 
595,293 
123,703 
20,698 
381,204 
114,426 
86,691 
548,845 
27,399 
65,670 
21,071 
114,355 
378,958 
38,683 
12,511 
128,776 
145,944 
90,230 
173.710 
4,058 
656, 555 



11 



Financial & Trade Notes: Magnavox reports net profit 
of $1,702,000 ($2.24 a share) on sales of $35,921,000 in 6 
months ended Dec. 31, 1953, compared to profit of $1,546,- 
000 ($2.02) on $26,126,000 in same period of 1952. The in- 
crease resulted from increments of all divs., reported pres. 
Frank Freimann, adding that while TV sales “compared 
favorably” with 6-month period of preceding year, biggest 
gain in civilian items was registered by high-fidelity equip- 
ment. He said many potential buyers of TV sets are 
deferring purchase because of “color propaganda” but 
added he felt this resistance will “melt away by fall as 
people begin to appreciate the true facts and will buy 
better quality black-&-white receivers to replace the mil- 
lions of sets that are not only outmoded but are in many 
cases costing more to maintain than the amortized price of 
a new big picture receiver.” Like several other set makers 
who have indicated such plans (Vol. 10:7), Freimann said 
Magnavox will not market a color set incorporating pres- 
ent-sized 15-in. tube but will produce a set with a 19-in. 
tube “now under development” which should be available 
“in modest quantities” by the end of the year, costing 
“slightly over” $1000. 

Sparks-Withington Co.’s sharp drop in earnings in 6 
months ended Dec. 31 is attributed by pres. John J. Smith 
to 10-week strike last summer at .Jackson, Mich, plants 
(Vol. 9:28), price cutting on TV sets and expenses of start- 
ing subsidiary Sparton Bcstg. Co.’s WWTV, Cadillac, 
Mich. Earnings were $18,931 (Ic a share) after taxes of 
$14,728 on sales of $14,744,515, compared with $454,341 
(49h) after taxes of $664,171 on $15,122,298 in same 1952 
period. Company omitted regular semi-annual dividend. 
Smith said company expected to offset losses during strike 
with greater sales during fall but “October price-cutting- 
broke out in the TV industry as a result of industry-wide 
overproduction. We were forced to reduce prices to meet 
this type of competition, and this was very harmful to our 
profit picture although it did put us in much better posi- 
tion from an inventory standpoint.” 

Color TV will have far more adverse effect on theatre 
business than did black-&-white, predicted Charles P. 
Skouras, pres, of National Theatres Inc., and he added his 
company would have fewer theatres in future than present 
413. He said sales for 1953 totaled $17,411,673 vs. $15,- 
656,044 in 1952. Net income for 13 weeks ended Dec. 26 
was $655,582 (24<‘ a share) compared to $544,697 (20(‘) 
same period of 1952. He said TV competition had been 
“stabilized” in older TV markets but was beginning to 
show up now in newer markets, particularly in the Rocky 
Mountain area, northern California and midwestern states. 

Stromberg-Carlson stockholders will vote at special 
meeting March 12 on pi-oposal to issue 100,000 shares of 
new cumulative convertible $50-par preferred stock and on 
plan to eliminate 80,000 shares of 4% convertible pre- 
ferred, called for redemption Feb. 15. Price and converti- 
bility rate of new issue would be determined later. Pres. 
Robei’t C. Tait said common-share stockholders would be 
given first opportunity to subscribe for new preferred, 
being sold to raise $3,500,000 to reduce short-term bank 
borrowings. 

Dividends: Hazeltine, 25c payable March 15 to holders 
of record March 1; Oak Mfg. Co., 35C March 15 to holders 
March 1; Clevite Corp., 25C Mai-ch 10 to holders Feb. 26; 
Cornell-Dubilier, 30C quarterly and 20 <- extra March 26 to 
holders March 8. 

Auction sale of as.sefs of Fidelity Tube Corp., Jewel 
Radio Corp. & Gem Radio & TV Corp., all owned by Don 
1. Ferraro ami adjudged bankiupt last week (Vol. 10:7), 
scheduU-d Maich 3 on com|)anies’ premises at 900 Passaic 
Ave., E. Newark, N. J. 



Electronics Reports: Another $5 billion year is in pros- 
pect for electronics industry for 1954, with increased sales 
of defense and industrial equipment and replacement parts 
more than offsetting any decline in TV-radio output. This 
was prediction of Robert C. Sprague, board chairman of 
RETMA and of Sprague Electric Co. in address to N. Y. 
Society of Security Analysts Feb. 18. 

He gave these dollar forecasts for this year: TV- 
radio, factory sales of $1.3 billion, down from last year’s 
$1.4 billion; military electronics, $3 billion vs. $2.8 billion 
in 1953; industrial equipment & replacement parts, $700,- 
000,000. He broke down estimates with these predictions; 

TV — Retail sales of 6,000,000 sets, production of 5,- 
800,000 black-&-white sets and “no more than 150,000 color 
sets,” with more than 500 stations on air by year’s end. 
Radio — “There may be a drop in demand for auto sets to 
about 4,000,000, but I believe there should be a market for 
a total of 11,000,000 sets of all types.” 

Defense electronics — “There should be a further rise 
in defense volume in 1954, and it is my firm conviction that 
this important segment of our business will remain at 
high levels for the foreseeable future, despite any reduc- 
tions [in] total defense spending.” 

Industrial electronics — “No one knows for sure what 
the sales of the electronics industry to the industrial mar- 
ket are, but they almost certainly run into hundreds of 
millions. Although this segment of our business may not 
equal the dollar importance of radio-TV and military 
equipment for a good many years, its rate of growth may 
well be the greatest of all. 

Replacement parts (civilian & military) — “This is 
already a business of the order of $500,000,000, and should 
increase substantially in size in the near future reflecting 
the large output of original equipment in the past 3 years.” 



One of most fascinating uses of closed-circuit in- 
dustrial TV to date got first test Feb. 8 in New York 
City when mock police “line-up” was sent from Manhattan 
headquarters to Brooklyn headquarters. Both Mayor 
Wagner and Police Commissioner Adams were enthusiastic 
and gave every indication system would be adopted to 
hook up all 85 precincts to televise regular daily line-up 
of suspected lawbreakers. Test used RCA ITV-5 equip- 
ment, v/ith signal microwaved to Empire State Bldg., 
then beamed to Brooklyn police headquarters. Commis- 
sioner Adams estimated it would cost about $50,000 to 
install hook-up, including one camera, “minimum number 
of receivers” and city-owned microwave equipment. 

New color bar generator offered by Telechrome Mfg. 
Corp., Amityville, L. I. (Model 509-DR) can provide 11 
color standard signals in bars which can be placed in 
various combinations across top, bottom or all of color 
tube, or in combination with monochrome pictures. It also 
produces dot pattern which may be superimposed on any of 
the displays for convergence alignment. 

Philadelphia Council of TV-Radio Service Assns. spon- 
sors color symposium for area distributors, dealers & serv- 
icemen at Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, April 2-4, in con- 
junction with regional convention of National TV Service 
Assn. 

Turning back the clock: Chief of Military History has 
approved official change in date of the founding of Army 
Signal Corps from March 3, 1863, when Congress author- 
ized creation of Signal Corps, to June 21, 1860, when Con- 
gress authorized appointment of first signal officer. 

Minnesota Electronics Corp., St. Paul, Minn., manu- 
facturei' of digital computers and subminiatme computer 
components, has been acquired by Librascope Inc., sub- 
sidiary of General Precision Equipment Corp. 



12 - 



C ONGRESS will take its first look at TV-radio matters 
for this session in couple of weeks when Senate Com- 
merce Committee or its new communications subcommit- 
tee under Sen. Potter (R-Mich.) invites FCC to the Hill 
for “orientation meeting.” Subcommittee is expected to 
hold first closed meeting this week. When FCC appears 
before Senators, commissioners are certain to be ques- 
tioned closely about proposed multiple ownership rules, 
political broadcasting, filing fees, “protest” procedures, 
uhf — virtually every hot issue in the TV-radio field. 

First full-dress hearing in communications field prob- 
ably will be on bill by Sen. Edwin Johnson (D-Colo.) to 
substitute “nominal” filing fee for FCC’s proposed sched- 
ule of much stiffen fees (Vol. 10:5, 7). Hearings also may 
be held on FCC’s requested legislation to reduce nuisance 
value of “protest” section of Communications Act. 

On the House side. Rep. Bishop (R-Ill.) introduced 
the perennial resolution to name special committee to in- 
vestigate political campaign expenditures, including, of 
course, TV & radio (H. Res. 439). The House Commerce 
Committee has been tied up in health legislation since start 
of session, and there’s no telling when it will get around 
to communications matters. Still pending before House 
is Hinshaw bill to classify subscription TV as “com- 
mon carrier” and subject it to rate regulation, limitation 
of profits, etc. 

Rep. Hinshaw (R-Cal.) tells us he has no intention of 
letting the measure drop, expects committee to hold hear- 
ings on it, and may even tack into other communications 
legislation as a rider. Committee chairman Wolverton 
(R-N. J.) has said nothing yet about hearings on Hinshaw 
bill or any other communications legislation. 

No similar bill has been introduced in Senate where 
members appear disinterested in subscription TV legisla- 
tion, to say the least. Sen. Johnson, who has taken most 
active part in TV-radio matters, takes wait-&-see attitude 
on Hinshaw bill, tells us he has no fixed opinion at pres- 
ent — “I’m going to see if the bill gets reported out in the 
House, and then let nature take its course.” 

m 

Network service to Albuquerque, N. M. — only pre- 
freeze city not yet interconnected — will begin Aug. 1. In- 
terconnection was ordered by NBC for KOB-TV and by 
CBS for KGGM-TV. Interconnected this week to AT&T’s 
nationwide system were WRDW-TV, Augusta, Ga. ; 
WTOC-TV, Savannah, Ga., and WNEM-TV, Bay City, 
Midi. Slated to be connected Feb. 20 was KTXL-TV, San 
Angelo, Tex. Private off-air pick-ups were begun recently 
by KATV, Pine Bluff, Ark (from Little Rock) ; WKST- 
TV, New Castle, Pa. (Pittsburgh) ; WCHA-TV, Chambers- 
burg (Washington, Baltimore) ; WTVU, Scranton (New 
York). 

Testimonial dinner for Judge Justin Miller, retiring 
as NARTB chairman (Vol. 10:5), will be held in Wash- 
ington’s Mayflower Hotel Wed. March 31. Tickets arc 
$20 a plate, with proceeds to be used for appropriate gift. 
Members of arrangements committee are Frank M. Russell, 
NBC Washington; Clair R. McCollough, WGAL-TV & 
WGAL, Lancaster, Pa.; Robert D. Swezey, WDSU-TV & 
WDSU, New Orleans; Ben Strouse, WWDC, Washington. 
G. Richard Shafto, WIS-TV & WIS, Columbia, S. C., will 
preside. 

CBS-TV cut summer program discount rate from 30% 
to 20% this week, disclosing all but 4 sponsors remained 
with network during last summer and all clients stayed 
on in 1952, when discount was 35%. CBS offer is made 
only to sponsors on record 13 weeks prior to summer, 
and to those guaranteeing 13 weeks sponsorship after 
summer. NBC-TV’s summer discount program last year 
was 25%, available only to new advertisers. 



Four applications for TV stations were filed this week 
with FCC, all of them superseding applications previously 
dismissed by same principals. Week’s applications were 
for Oakland, Cal., Ch. 2, by General Teleradio officers 
Ward D. Ingram & Wm. D. Pabst, General Teleradio 
retaining option to purchase stock (replacing application 
for same channel by General Teleradio); for Boston, Ch. 5, 
by Massachusetts Bay Telecasters (resubmitted); for 
Jefferson City, Mo., Ch. 13, by KWOS (resubmitted with 
some ownership changes); for Oak Hill, W. Va., Ch. 4 
(allocated to Beckley), by Robert R. Thomas (submitted 
as substitute for one previously filed for Ch. 4, allocated 
to Fayetteville). There were 12 dismissals this week, 
leaving total of 301 applications pending, including 54 
uhf. [For further details about these applications, see 
TV Addenda 18-G herewith; for complete listings of all 
grants, new applications, dismissals, hearings, etc., see 
TV Factbook No. 18 and Addenda to date.] 

First month of Telemeter pay-as-you-look operation 
in Palm Springs, Cal. was summarized this week by In- 
tel national Telemeter pres. Carl Leserman: (1) Average 
coinbox-equipped home put $10 in box during month. 
(2) Number of Telemeter homes increased from 71 to 148, 
while total homes getting community antenna service in- 
creased from 512 to 614. (3) Survey indicates 80-90% 

of set owners want Telemeter. (4) In first month, 25 
events were offered, including following movies; Forever 
Female, The Moon is Blue, I Confess, Flight to Taiigiers, 
All the Brothers Were Valiant, Little Boy Lost, Shane, 
Fort Bravo, Kind Hearts & Coronets, High Noon, Lady 
Wants Mink, The Quiet Man, Stalag 17, Baivdwagon, J, 
The Jury, Here Come the Girls, You’re Killing Me, Vice 
Squad, Roman Holiday, Come Back Little Sheba, The 
Robinson Story, Just For You. 

Ad agencies getting big RCA account were announced 
by pres. Frank Folsom this week. Three agencies will 
split account, estimated at $8-12,000,000 annually, formerly 
held by J. Walter Thompson. Kenyon & Eckhardt will get 
lion’s share, handle RCA-sponsored home instruments, TV- 
radio programs and institutional ads. Grey Adv. is r-e- 
tained for all NBC work plus RCA records. A1 Paul 
Lefton, Philadelphia, will work on home appliances and 
electronic products other than home instruments. Contin- 
uing for RCA Communications is Gehnrich Associates, and 
for RCA financial ads, Albert Frank Guenther Law. 

Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, RCA-NBC chairman, having 
appeared on CBS-Radio Feb. 14 with CBS chairman Wm. 
S. Paley and other celebrities in salute to Freeman Gosden 
& Charles Correll (Amos ’n’ Andy), goes on CBS-TV 
March 12 10:30-11 p.ni. for interview in his N. Y. home by 
Edward R. Muri’ow (a CBS v.p.) on Person to Person. 

How to push uhf will be subject of day-long sessions 
March 1 at Washington’s Statler Hotel, under sponsor- 
ship of National Citizens Committee for Educational TV. 
Representatives have been invited from FCC, NARTB, 
RETMA, networks and Ultra High Frequency Assn. Two- 
thirds of educational allocations are uhf. 

AFM musicians union and 3 TV-radio networks 
reached agreement Feb. 19 on 10% pay boost to New York 
start' musicians with no changes in number of musicians 
to he employed by each network. ABC, CBS & NBC were 
involved in the negotiations with Local 802. 

Proposal to require Washington CAA clearance for all 
proposed towers higher than 500 ft., backed by Air Force 
(Vol. 10:7), was deferred for 2 weeks “for fuitliei- stiuiy” 
by Washington Airsimce Subcommittee at Feb. 16 meeting. 

Assn, of National Advertisers schedules annual spring 
meeting at Hot Springs, Va., March 17-19. 



t 





PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY RADI% IjljElffB W^AYT BLm WAJlfNGTON 5. D.C. • TELEPHONE STERLING 3-1755 •VOL. 10: No. 9 

WAR 1 1954 February 27, 1954 



with Electronics 



/ 

: ir Reports 



MARTIN CO DEL’S 

AUTHORITATIVE NEWS SERVICE 
FOR MANAGEMENT 
OF THE 

VISUAL BROADCASTING 
AND ALLIED ELECTRONICS 
ARTS AND INDUSTRY 



in this 
issues 



' CBS Survey First With VHF-UHF Breakdown, page 1 
UHFs Question FCC 'Power' Philosophy, page I 
J 3 New Starters — 2 of Them in Duluth, page 2 
Few Sizeable Markets Remain Unserved, page 3 
Hearings Too Slow, Changes in Works, page 3 



Transmitter Shipments & Upcoming Stations, page 4 
First Community Antenna Sale, Brisk Activity, page 5 
NBC Working on Color Cost Estimates, page 7 
Color Service Clinics Draw Big Attendance, page 7 
Predictions on Color for Next 5 Years, page 8 



CBS SURVEY FIRST WITH VHF-UHF BREAKDOWN: Most authoritative sets-in-use survey 
available is the CBS-TV report, released this week, which we have reprinted and 
sent herewith as 12-p. Special Report to all subscribers. 

Survey was conducted by A. C. Nielsen Co ., based on direct contact with 
100,000 families in all 3070 U.S. counties. Study is about as thorough as one 
could hope for, considering cost and time elements. 

Nielsen conducted a 100.000-family suryey in May, 1952 . which was projected 
to May, 1953, by NBC and CBS. These projections were reprinted in our TV Factbook 
No. 17 of July 15, 1953. Current survey supersedes those. 

Only drawback of survey — an unayoidable one — is that it's dated Nov. 1, 
1953. This works to the disadvantage of uhf stations, particularly, because the 4 
months since that date haye been period of most concentrated uhf production and 
sales to date. To lesser degree, new vhf stations in brand new markets are also at 
disadvantage because figures don't reflect set sales of last 4 months. 



* * * * 

Survey shows 27,506,500 families with TV sets , yhf and uhf — a 50% pene- 
tration of nation's 47,191,500 homes. Uhf total was 1,774,690 . a 4% penetration 
of U.S. homes — or 7% of all TV sets. 

Our own estimate of uhf sets-in-use as of Noy. 7, 1953 (Vol. 9:45) was 
"over 1,500,000," showing our calculations were conservative. Using same method of 
estimating, we figure that 2,750,000-3,000.000 current sets-in-use are Lohf equipped. 
This would mean that approximately 6% of U.S. families haye uhf sets and that about 
9-10% of all TV sets in hands of public can receive uhf today. 

We arrive at those figures as follows ; RETMA reports 457,267 sets were uhf- 
equipped at factory in Nov. -Dec . -Jan. Add estimated 100,000 for Feb. and total is 

557.000. Figuring 1.5 "field conversions " (external converters and strips) for 
each set equipped for uhf at factory, we get 835,000 more. Add factory and field 
figures and total is 1,392,000 uhfs produced since Nov. 1. Experience indicates 
that about 2/3 of these have been sold — for net uhf accretion of somewhat under 

1.000. 000 to be added to the 1,774,690 found by Nielsen on Nov. 1. 

Total of 2,750,000-3,000,000 uhf sets-in-use therefore seems a reasonable 
figure, since we've found our method of calculation to be conservative in past. 

Even more important than U.S. totals , however, are individual figures which 
speak for themselves — excellent progress in some areas, poor growth in others. 



UHFs QUESTION FCC TOWER' PHILOSOPHY: FOG'S thinking about raising uhf po we r "flop r " 
(Vol. 10:8) was immediately attacked by some uhf broadcasters as "unrealistic" in 
that it ignores excellent coverage frequently achieved with 1-kw transmitters. 

Subject is expected to come to head in c o uple weeks , when the Commission con- 
siders whether to open idea to industry comments by issuing proposed rule-making. 
Whether proposal will ever be advanced by Commission remains anyone's guess. At the 



COPVmaHT 1*84 SV RADIO NKW« BUREAU 



2 



moment, it*s more likely than not . If proposed, there's bound to be vigorous oppo- 
sition, reducing chances of final adoption. 

Whole matter is tied up v/ith fact that many stations have CPs for higher- 
powered transmitters but have been operating with lower power under special tempo- 
rary authority (STA) because of amplifier unavailability. 

With amplifier delivery dates coming close r, FCC is now debating whether the 
"era of the STA" is near its end and whether operators should be required either to: 
(1) install a mplifiers to reach power specified in CPs or, (2) get CPs modifie d for 
the lower power they're now using — assuming the lower power meets FCC standards. 

FCC has ge n erally been cautious , in granting STAs, not to give them out un- 
less STA power provides minimum signal levels specified in rules. If present mini- 
mums are retained, operators' problem won't be difficult. But if minimums are upped 
beyond capabilities of 1-kw transmitters, many stations will be in the soup. 

It co mes dow n to question of judg ment — operators' vs. FCC's. Former feel 
they're in better position to determine coverage in their specific areas and whether 
purchase of higher power is economically justifiable . At FCC, it's claimed that the 
early TV and FM history shows that station operators have a t endency to under-power 
their facilities — to their own detriment as well as that of viewers and listeners. 

3 NEW STARTERS-2 OF THEM IN DULUTH: Race between 2 vhf grantees in Duluth-Superior 
ended In photo finish this week, with CBS & NBC affiliates both putting out test 
patterns from temporary towers and antennas with interim power of about 5-kw ERP. 
Both stations did their building during bitter Minnesota winter and plan to erect 
permanent towers when weather improves . They're first competitors for WFTV, which 
began operation last May on Ch. 38. 

Also starting this week was new Schenectady outlet , bringing total stations 
on air to 370 as of this writing, of which 129 are uhf . But one will be subtracted 
Sun. Feb. 28, when DuMont's KCTY, Kansas City (Ch. 25) is slated to go off air for 
keeps (Vol. 10:7). Another half-dozen stations are in our "imminent" file, having 
given March 1 target dates which appear reasonably firm. The latest starters: 

* * * 

WDSM-TV, Duluth-Superior (Ch. 6) began test operations Feb. 23, goes commer- 
cial as primary non- interconnected CBS affiliate March 1. It's using 5-kw GE trans- 
mitter and 90-ft. interim tower, pending construction of 500-ft. tower as soon as 
weather permits. It's controlled by Northwest Publications Inc . (Ridder) , publisher 
of Duluth Herald and News-Tribune, which also controls WCCO-TV, Minneapolis and some 
other newspaper and radio properties. Rodney A. Quick is gen. mgr. ; Edwin M. Conrad 
is production mgr. ; Jerry Bauman, chief engineer. Rep is Free & Peters. Station's 
rates haven't yet been announced. 

KDAL-T V . Duluth-Superior (Ch. 3) got on air ahead of target when it turned on 
test pattern Feb. 19 using interim 5-kw RCA transmitter and temporary 1-bay batwing 
antenna 106 ft. above ground, begins programming in "2 or 3 weeks" as NBC affiliate. 
Dalton LeMasurier , principal owner (70%) & gen. mgr., wires: "Many excellent reports 

typical is Ironwood, Mich., more than 100 mi. from Duluth." It plans to increase 

power to maximum 100 kw with 500-ft. tower late this summer. Odin Ramsland is v.p. 

& commercial mgr. ; Earl Henton, program director; Robert Dettman, v.p. & chief 
engineer. Base rate is $250. Rep is Avery-Knodel. 

WTRI, Schenectady (Ch. 35) began testing Feb. 21, with gen. mgr. Dick Wheeler 
reporting "excellent coverage of entire area." It has 12-kw GE transmitter, 500-ft. 
Blaw-Knox tower atop Mt. Rafinesque, 2 mi. east of Troy. It's 3rd station in the 
Albany-Schenectady-Troy area, competitors being GE's pre-freeze WRGB, Schenectady 
(Ch. 6) and V/ROW-TV, Albany (Ch. 41). New station is owned by Fabian Theater in- 
terests (Stanley Warner Corp. ) and Col. Harry C. Wilder , founder and ex-owner of 
Syracuse's WSYR-TV, who operates WTRY, Troy. Paul L. Jacobson is asst. gen. mgr. ; 
Raymond Brown Jr., sales mgr. ; Albert Chismark, chief engineer. It's alternate in- 
terconnected CBS-TV affiliate. Base rate is $200. Rep is Headley-Reed. 

KCEB, Tulsa (Ch. 23), which began intermittent tests Jan. 28 (Vol. 10:6), 
started regular test pattern operation Feb. 22, begins programming March 6. 



- 3 - 

FEW SIZEABLE MARKETS REMAIN UNSERVED: Analysis of new stations possible this year , 
based on the 208 CPs outstanding, shows that this year's expansion will be mostly in 
"depth", i.e., more stations in existing TV cities, rather than brand new markets. 

Scanning the nation's largest 512 markets and matching them with grantees 
yet to go on air, we find perhaps 15-20 "new markets" in prospect — and parts of 
most of these markets are already served with fair-to-good signals from other areas. 

In applying criterion "new ," we've chosen as rough rule-of-thumb any market 
whose major city is 60 mi. or more from the existing TV cities. Excepting markets 
smaller than the first 312 — and there are some CPs for those smaller markets — 
here are the prospects for rest of year; 

There are actually 16 new markets possible if all present grantees get on 
air this year. But 6 in these markets haven't set any target dates yet, and while 
other 10 do have 1954 targets, grantees' estimates are frequently over-optimistic. 

Total new homes these stations will bring within range of primary TV signals 
will be considerably smaller than last year — perhaps 500,000-800,000 households, 
compared with 2-3 times that in 1953 — even when we include in our calculations 
the 4 additional "CP markets" which are 50-60 mi. from nearest TV city. 

With so few completely new markets due to open , it can be seen that increase 
in TV audience and set sales must come from existing markets to far greater extent 
than last year. Of course, many of last year's markets have long way to go to reach 
same saturation as pre-freeze markets — and other factors such as power & height 
increases will bring more new families into primary signal range, in addition to 
the constant and growing replacement and second-set market everywhere. 

Biggest market 60 mi. or more from a TV city is Beaumont-Port Arthur, Tex., 
nation's 94th largest market area. 

Others in this category , for which CPs are outstanding; Corpus Christi, Tex. 
(106th largest) ; Orlando, Fla . (134) ; Eugene, Ore . (176) ; Alexandria, La . (205) ; 
Cumberland. Md . (207) ; Watertown. N.Y . (210) ; Wausau. Wis . (221) ; La Crosse, Wis . 
(245) ; Wilmington. N.C . (254) ; Jackson, Tenn . (260) ; Great Falls, Mont . (275) ; 

Enid, Okla . (276) ; Cheyenne, Wyo . (289) ; Albany. Ga . (297) ; Rapid City, S.D . (309). 

These additional markets are 50-60 mi . from cities with TV: Chattanooga 
(79) ; Williamsport, Pa . (191) ; Kingston. N.Y . (201) ; Fairmont. W.Va . (237). 

HEARINGS TOO SLOW, CHANGES IN WORKS: Though FCC issued 5 CPs and an initial decision 
this week, progress in hearings has so bogged down that Commission and industry 
attorneys this week met and agreed that immediate changes should be made . Federal 
Communications Bar Assn, plans to submit recommendations next week. CPs this week; 

Selma. Ala . . WBAM (Montgomery, Ala.), Ch. 8; El Dorado. Ark .. KVMA (Magnolia, 
Ark), Ch. 10; Washington. D.C ., WOOK, Ch. 50; Rapid City, S.D . . Hills Bcstg. Co., 

Ch. 7; Houston , Houston TV Co., Ch. 13. Initial decision , coming after opposition 
dropped out, favored grant of Ch. 2 to WUSN, Charleston, S.C . 

* * * if 

" The new hearing procedures just aren't working ." says FCBA pres. Vincent 
Welch. FCC-industry conference Feb. 26 didn't agree on all reasons why they're not 
working but it did conclude that immediate action is needed. Principal problems: 

(1) Exchange of information . There's no clear-cut procedure whereby attor- 
neys know what information and exhibits to exchange among contestants, and when. 

(2) " Points of significant difference " among contestants. Many industry 
attorneys say this is something they should supply after hearing, not before. 

(3) Variations from hearing to hearing . Great differences in opinion among 
examiners and FCC counsel, regarding procedures, cause many delays. 

Attending conference for FCBA were Welch, Wm. Koplovitz, Wm. Dempsey, Henry 
Fischer, Robert Heald. For FCC: Joseph Kittner, Arthur Scheiner, Robert Rawson. 

Among other actions , FCC this week: (1) Dropped its city-by-citv processing 
priorities because it has caught up, can now handle applications as they are filed. 
(2) Propose d adding Ch. 2 to Havana, Fla., 16 mi. from Tallahassee, and substituting 
Ch. 68 for Ch. 56 in Petaluma, Cal. (3) Dismissed petition of CP-holder WPRO-TV, 
Providence, R.I., requesting WNET (Ch. 16) be detained from going on air with STA. 



1 



- 4 - 



T ransmitter shipments continue at modest pace, 
with 4 reported this week. RCA shipped 10-kw units 
to WLAC-TV, Nashville (Ch. 5), due on air in spring, to 
WDEF-TV, Chattanooga (Ch. 12), due in April or May, 
and to WKBT, La Crosse, Wis. (Ch. 8), with summer 
target. DuMont Feb. 24 shipped 500-watt transmitter to 
CFCM-TV, Quebec City (Ch. 4), which has May target. 

GE reports shipment of 5-bay antenna Feb. 23 to 
KSAN-TV, San Francisco (Ch. 32), which was sent 1-kw 
GE transmitter Jan. 22 and gives March 1 as target date. 
GE has new orders from KALB-TV, Alexandria, La. (Ch. 
5) for 5-kw transmitter and 6-bay antenna, and from 
KPLC-TV, Lake Charles, La. (Ch. 7) for 5-kw transmitter 
and 12-bay antenna, both to be delivered next month. 

General Precision Laboratory reports 1-kw GPL-Con- 
tinental transmitter is due for shipment next week to 
WJPB-TV, Fairmont, W. Va. (Ch. 35), to be followed by 
1-kw to WQXL-TV, Louisville (Ch. 41) in about 3 weeks. 
Continental Electronics, Dallas, which makes the trans- 
mitters, is slated to have 12-kw uhf unit by late summer, 
probably using Eimac klystron tube. 

RCA was due to ship its second 50-kw amplifier Feb. 
27 — to WTRF-TV, Wheeling, W. Va. (Ch. 7), which began 
operation last Oct. 

* 

In our continuing survey of upcoming new stations, 
these were the reports received this week: 

WISH-TV, Indianapolis (Ch. 8), granted last month, 
plans to get on air about July 1, has signed affiliation 
with ABC. RCA equipment has been ordered, contract 
has been let for transmitter house and negotiations are 
under way for tower contract. Bolling will be rep. 

KQED, San Francisco (Ch. 9, educational) hasn’t yet 
received converted KPIX transmitter because of delay due 
to defective part, now has promise of March 1, hopes to 
begin test patterns March 15, according to gen. mgr. 
James Day. It’s buying additional equipment with $113,- 
724 grant from Fund for Adult Education (Ford Founda- 
tion). Tentative May 1 programming target depends on 
success of fund drives, particularly on reaching $150,000 
goal for gifts and contributions from business firms. 

WTTW, Chicago (Ch. 11, educational) hasn’t ordered 
equipment or begun construction, plans tests next fall, 
programming in Jan., according to Robert L. Foote, secy, 
of Chicago Educational Television Foundation. Foundation 
pres. Edward L. Ryerson reported drive for funds had 
reached 80% of the estimated $1,100,000 required to build 
and operate station for 2 years. 

WSLI-TV, Jackson, Miss. (Ch. 12) hopes to meet 
March 15 test target, go commercial March 27, reports TV 
operations mgr. Owens F. Alexander. It will begin with 
214-kw visual power, using 20-kw GE transmitter and 
12-bay antenna atop 600-ft. Andrews tower. An inter- 
connected ABC affiliate, it will be third outlet there — 
WJTV (Ch. 25) having begun in Jan. 1953, WLBT (Ch. 
3) last Dec. Hour rate will be $200. Weed will be rep. 

KVAL-TV, Eugene, Ore. (Ch. 13) expects to finish 
moving into new studio-transmitter building early in 
March, plans tests about March 15 using 10-kw RCA 
transmitter and 360-ft. Fisher tower topped by 6-bay an- 
tenna, reports gen. mgr. S. W. McCready. It plans April 
1 programming, will be NBC affiliate. Base rate will be 
$175. Rep will be Hollingbery. 

WGTH-TV, Hartford, Conn. (Ch. 18) has GE 12-kw 
transmitter scheduled for delivery soon, but won’t com- 
plete construction until this spring, when it hopes to begin 
transmitting from 300-ft. Lehigh tower, according to gen. 
mgr. Fred Wagenvoord. Rep not yet chosen. 

WBOC-TV, Salisbury, Md. fCh. 16), with all con- 
struction near completion and RCA transmitter scheduled 
for March 1 delivery, now plans test patterns 1st week in 



April, programming April 15, reports v.p.-gen. mgr. 
Charles J. Truitt. Its 600-ft. Wind Turbine tower, to be 
topped with 47-ft. RCA antenna, is scheduled to be ready 
about March 15. It’s building own microwave relay, will 
carry ABC and DuMont programs. Base rate will be 
$200. Rep not yet chosen. 

KVAN-TV, Vancouver, Wash. (Ch. 21) remains stale- 
mated by lack of equipment and problems concerning loca- 
tion of transmitter across Columbia River in Portland, 
Ore. (Vol. 10:4), now has tentative April 15 target, re- 
ports gen. mgr. Fred F. Chitty. Rep will be Bolling. 

WTEV-TV, New Bedford, Mass. (Ch. 28), after 
finally getting CAA site clearance, began construction of 
studio-transmitter building Feb. 23 on Bullock Rd., Free- 
town, about half way between New Bedford and Fall 
River, writes owner Basil Brewer. He expects to be on 
the air in 4-6 months with 251-kw visual power using 
12-kw transmitter and 650-ft. tower. Rep will be Walker. 

WSEE, Erie, Pa. (Ch. 35), with 12-kw GE trans- 
mitter due for March 10 delivery and 698-ft. Stainless 
tower scheduled to be ready by March 31, now has April 
15 test target, plans commercial programming April 25, 
according to gen. mgr. Charles E. Denny. It’s signed as 
primary interconnected CBS affiliate. Rep will be Avery- 
Knodel. It will be first local competitor for WICU. 

WOOK-TV, Washington (Ch. 50), just granted to 
United Bcstg. Co. Inc., hasn’t ordered equipment or final- 
ized construction plans, but plans start early in 1955, re- 
ports owner Richard Eaton who also holds CP for WTLF, 
Baltimore (Ch. 18). United Bcstg. Co. will be rep. 

* « « :j: 

CHSJ-TV, St. John, N.B. (Ch. 4) has its Canadian 
GE transmitter, now plans March 8 tests, goes commercial 
March 22. Its 40-ft. Ajax tower is atop Mt. Champlain, 
1200-ft. above av. terrain, 18 mi. from St. John. Church 
St. studios in St. John will send programs by coaxial to 
penthouse of Admiral Beatty Hotel where they’ll be 
beamed by microwave to transmitter on Mt. Champlain. 
It’s first TV to get going in the Maritimes. CJCB-TV, 
Sydney (Ch. 4), is due next July; CBHT, Halifax (Ch. 3), 
due in Oct. CHSJ-TV’s base rate will be $165. Rep will 
be All-Canada Television. 



P ROFITABLE WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids, in particular 
— and TV station finances in general — ai-e subject of 
6-p. story in Feb. 20 Busmess Week, complete with sta- 
tion’s balance sheet for fiscal 1953. Article details philos- 
ophy of intensive local pi'ogramming (“names make 
news”) practiced by Harry M. Bitner Jr. — whose picture 
is on magazine’s cover — since he and his father took over 
station (then WLAV-TV) from Leonard A. Versluis for 
$1,365,000 in 1951 (Vol. 7 :19, 38) . Bitners also have con- 
trolling interest in WFBM-TV & WFBM, Indianapolis, as 
well as AM stations in Flint, Mich. & Evansville, Ind. and 
radio WOOD. 

WOOD-TV’s net profit before taxes jumped IfiO'i 
from $137,353 in fiscal year ended Nov. 30, 1952 to $491,- 
418 in fiscal 1953, while total revenues increased 36%, 
article states. Fiscal 1953 operating profit was $525,066, 
befoi-e deduction of interest and other charges. Station’s 
revenues for year, as reported by Busmess Week: Local 
$269,045; national $576,214; netw'ork $482,917; other reve- 
nues (including talent & rehearsal charges) $72,228; total 
operating revenues $1,400,404; less $46,342 for doubtful 
accounts; net operating revenues $1,354,062. 

Operating expenses: Program & studio $230,416; 
technical $244,610; selling $104,570; administrative & gen- 
eral $121,677; occupancy $127,722; total $823,996. Total 
investment in station is $1,967,000, including new- trans- 
mitter (for April delivery), tow'er & antenna at $602,000. 
New studio-office building will add $300,000-350.000. 



i 



5 



PorSOnal Notes: Hugh B. Terry, pres. & gen. mgr. of 
KLZ-TV & KLZ, Denver, discharged from hospital after 
6-week illness, due to return to desk in mid-March . . . 
Leslie Harris, ex-v.p. & partner in film producers Bernard 
L. Schubert Inc. (Mr. & Mrs. North, Topper, Gang- 
husters), named to new post of v.p. & gen. mgr. of CBS- 
TV Film Sales; he’s onetime Colgate-Palmolive Co. TV- 
radio director and NBC national radio program director 
. . . Henry M. Solomon, ex-finance mgr. of WRGB, Schenec- 
tady, named mgr. of upcoming WTEV-TV, New Bedford, 
Mass., due in summer , . . Gordon Williamson, ex-Belmont 
Ver Standig Adv., Washington, named gen. mgr. of WISE- 
TV, Asheville, N. C. . . . Loren B. Stone, ex-gen. mgr. of 
KBRO (AM), Bremerton, W'ash., named mgr. of educa- 
tional KUOW-TV, Seattle, aiming for fall start . . . Gen. 
David Sarnoff, RCA chairman, to be presented annual 
humanitarian award of Philadelphia’s Golden Slipper 
Square Club at banquet in Bellevue-Stratford March 3 
. . . J. English Smith, ex-Music Corp. of America, named 
business mgr. of ABC-TV services dept.; Alfred R. 
Schneider appointed asst, to James A. Stabile, director of 
ABC-TV’s new business affairs dept. . . . John Rossiter 
resigns as gen. mgr. of WJTV, Jackson, Miss., to become 
gen. mgr. of upcoming KBMT, Beaumont, due in spring 
. . . Robert Mayo, ex-sales director of WOR-TV & WOR, 
joins CBS-TV sales dept., replacing Herbert Hobler, now 
gen. sales mgr. of Teleprompter . . . Orville Neely pro- 
moted to chief engineer of WDAN-TV, Danville, 111. . . . 
Col. R. P. Landry named Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 



V ALUE OF COMMUNITY ANTENNA systems was 
further enhanced this week with disclosure of first sale 
of a system — purchase of TV Cable Corp. of Schuylkill 
Haven, Pa. by Pottsville Trans-Video Corp. Selling price 
of highly successful system, which has 1100 subscribers, 
wasn’t disclosed. 

Pottsville group is headed by Martin F. Malarkey Jr., 
pres, of National Community TV Assn. Schuylkill Haven 
company had 7 stockholders, with Amos M. Strause pres, 
and Wm. J. Calsam mgr. 

Meanwhile, community activity continues briskly on 
several fronts; 

(1) System in Casper, Wyo., the first to be fed by 
phone company microwave, is adding connections at rapid 
rate, hopes before long to reach break-even point despite 
$7800 monthly cost of 122-mi. microwave service. 

(2) Entire community industry awaits FCC action 
on microwave application of J. E. Belknap & Associates, 
Poplar Bluff, Mo., anticipates that favorable decision will 
spark accelerated expansion of systems. 

(3) Latest system in opei'ation is Muscle Shoals TV 
Cable Corp., serving Florence, Sheffield & Tuscumbia, Ala. 
System is joint undertaking of Jerrold Electj'onics Co. and 
investment houses Fox, Wells & Co. and Goldman, Sachs 
& Co. According to Jerrold pres. Milton Shapp, population 
of 68,000 in area offers potential for largest system in 
country. Same group has taken over system in Bluefield, 
W. Va., is reconstructing with new equipment. 

(4) National Community TV Assn, boai-d meets in 
New York’s Park-Sheraton Hotel March 2, primarily to 
plan for annual convention, this time expanded to 3 days — 
June 14-16 in same hotel. 

(5) One of mo.st rugged installations of all, antenna 
atop 13,777-ft. Mt. McNamee, seiving molybdenum miners 
in Climax, Colo., is subject of feature article in Feb. 18 
Retailing Daily. 



Revised AM conductivity map, first change in 12 years, 
was approved and issued by FCC this week. Small map 
accompanies decision CNotice .64-263) ; large map may he 
bought from Govt. Printing Office ($3. .50) after March 15. 



controller of administration, succeeded as CBC Quebec 
province director by Aurele Seguin, Quebec program direc- 
tor . . . Alice O’Hare, ex-DuMont Netwoi-k, named program 
mgr. of WGLV-TV, Easton, Pa.; Pete Gallagher, ex- 
WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, named production mgr. . . . Rich- 
ard Ross named news director of KING-TV, Seattle, suc- 
ceeding Charles Herring, now with CBS-TV Hollywood . . . 
Frank Beazley named sales mgr. of Bakersfield’s KBAK- 
TV, formerly KAFY-TV . . . Wm. P. Geary promoted to 
sales mgr. of WMGT, Adams-Pittsfield, Mass. . . . Mario E. 
Svacina promoted to film editor of WTRI, Schenectady 
. . . Henry Boren named merchandising director of KSL- 
TV, Salt Lake City . . . Barbara B. Whigham named 
sales promotion director of WJHP-TV & WJHP, Jackson- 
ville . . . Steven Briggs, ex-WTTV, Bloomington, Ind., 
named production mgr. of grantee WISH-TV, Indian- 
apolis . . . Burt Champion named Paramount Pictures’ TV- 
radio promotion director . . . A1 Larson named commercial 
mgr. of KPHO-TV, Howard Stalnaker commercial mgr. of 
KPHO, Phoenix . . . Edwin A. Wilhelm joins Maxon TV- 
radio dept, in charge of Gillette account . . . Philip A. 
Melillo promoted to production mgr. of WMAL-TV, Wash- 
ington, replacing David M. Davis, resigned. 



Wilfred S. Roberts, 47, chief TV-radio producer-direc- 
tor of Benton & Bowles (Red Buttons Show, The Doctor) 
and onetime NBC national production mgr., died Feb. 24 
in N. Y. after brief illness. 



Media and industries which “compete” with TV are 
generally stronger than ever — despite early prophesies of 
doom. That’s gist of 5th annual report of Jerry N. Jordan 
of N. W. Ayer & Son ad agency for RETMA sports com- 
mittee. It’s continuation of research done by Jordan at 
Princeton and at U of Pennsylvania, in which he stressed 
“novelty theory” — that TV’s harm to competing media 
slackens off after novelty of set ownership has worn off. 
In new report, he points out more than half of U. S. fam- 
ilies now own TV, and nationally TV passed out of novelty 
stage in 1953. “Nearly every industry it was supposed to 
hurt turned upward in income, attendance or sales — many 
reaching their all-time peak,” he concludes, adding that 
newspapers, magazines, radio, books, concerts, track & 
harness racing and professional football had the best years 
in their history, and motion pictures, college football and 
basketball were “climbing again after a temporary de- 
cline.” Baseball attendance dropped, but income by sports 
as whole approximated 1949’s all-time peak. Using sta- 
tistics and figures, report says increase in time and labor- 
saving devices since World War II has created more leisure 
time for recreation and that forward-looking leaders of 
recreation industry have learned to live with and profit by 
TV. Copies of 26-p. survey, TV’s Novelty Is Over — What 
Can Yon Expect Novj?, are available from RETMA. 

Now in receivership under state bankruptcy laws, 
KMPT, Oklahoma City (Ch. 19) “looks like it will keep 
going and probably pay out what it owes,” according to 
Byrne Ross, former pres. & gen. mgr. of KMPT, and sole 
owner of Oklahoma City’s radio KLPR. The DuMont 
affiliate, plagued with technical troubles after it went on 
air last Nov., lists more than $250,000 in outstanding debts. 
Court named local attorney Everett Cotter receiver, gave 
him until April 12 to submit reorganization plan while 
station continues operation. Ross owns 4.5% of KMPT, 
but resigned from management about month ago after 
dispute with board of directors on policy matters — particu- 
larly beer & wine advertising, which he opposes — after 
which most other top staffers quit. Station has 70 stock- 
holders, largest being R. Lewis Barton (11.26%), who 
succeeded Ross as pres. 



1 



- 6 - 



Station Accounts: Banks’ use of tv win increase this 
year over 1953, when number using TV more than doubled 
1952 rate and was 7 times larger than 1950, according to 
annual survey by American Bankers Assn., 12 East 36th 
St., New York. Survey of 14,130 commercial banks shows 
they plan to increase all types of ads this year to total of 
$68,000,000, or $7,000,000 more than in 1953. On debit 
side, however, majority of banks rated TV tenth among 
media in effectiveness (newspapers led), but replied they 
planned to increase TV use nonetheless. J ust this week, 
10 savings banks in Brooklyn and Queens signed to 
sponsor Hajypy Felton’s Knot Hole Gang on W OR-T V 
preceding Brooklyn Dodgers baseball games, thru Muir & 
Co. . . . Apropos of banks & TV, Robert H. Cole, U of Illi- 
nois, has released new report, Ho^v Banks Use TV Ad- 
vertising, listing reactions (mostly favorable) from 163 
banks as of last Aug. . . . Eversharp Inc. to sponsor filmed 
Eversharp Theatre in 50 markets beginning March 1, thru 
Biow . . . California Car Co. to sponsor Danger on the Air 
on 14-station CBS-TV Pacific Network starting Feb. 28, 
Sun. 10:30-11:30 a.m., thru M. S. Scott & Assoc., Los 
Angeles . . . Di.xie Cup, old network sponsor, moves into 
station purchases, buying Coivboy G-Men in 18 markets, 
with option on 6 more, thru Hicks & Greist . . . Gobel 
Brewing Co. and Speedway Petroleum Corp. to sponsor 42 



Network Accounts: First ten sponsors for NBC-TV’s 

Home series (Vol. 10:7) which debuts March 1, 11 a.m.- 
noon, were signed this week for 228 participations, repre- 
senting gross time-&-talent value of $1,500,000. Sponsois. 
Aluminum Co. of America, thru Fuller & Smith & Ross; 
Sunbeam Corp. (electrical appliances), thru Perrin-Paus 
Co., Chicago; Pepperell Mfg. Co., Boston (linens), thru 
Benton & Bowles; General Mills (Betty Crocker cake mix), 
thru BBDO; Helena Rubinstein, thru Hewitt, Ogilvie, 
Benson & Mather; James Lees & Sons (carpets), thru 
D’Arcy; American Greeting Card Co., Cleveland, thru 
Fuller & Smith & Ross; Avoset Corp., Los Angeles (Qwip 
whipped cream), thru Fletcher D. Richards; Dow Corn- 
ing Corp., Midland, Mich. (Silicon water repellent), thru 
Anderson & Cairns. Tenth was identified by NBC merely 
as “leading manufacturer of major kitchen appliances 
CBS-TV’s 7-9 a.m. Morning Show, which debuts 
March 15 (Vol. 10:8) reportedly signed Renuzit (spot 
remover), thru Feigenbaum & Werman, Philadelphia; 
Old Dutch Cleanser, thru Grant Adv.; Monsanto Chemi- 
cal Co. (All detergent), thru Gardner Adv., St. Louis 
Ford Motor Co. sponsors New Orleans Mardi Gras 
March 2 on NBC-TV in 3 segments: Rex parade 11:45 
a.m.-12:30 p.m., Comus parade 9:30-10 p.m., Rex ball 
midnight-12 :30 a.m., thru J. Walter Thompson . . .Ply- 
mouth Motors buys That’s My Boy, replacing Medallion 
Theatre on CBS-TV starting April 10, Sat. 10-10:30 
p.m., thru N. W. Ayer . . . Post cereals to sponsor Portia 
Faces Life on CBS-TV starting April 5, Mon.-thru-Fri. 
1:15-1:30 p.m., thru Young & Rubicam . . . Nash-Kel- 
vinator to be alt.-week sponsor (with Block Drug Co.) of 
Danger on CBS-TV starting March 16, Tue. 10-10:30 p.m., 
thru Geyer . . . Philip Morris sponsors Public Defender 
in place of Philip Morris Theatre on CBS-TV starting 
March 11, Thu. 10-10:30 p.m., thru Biow . . . General 
Foods Corp. (Instant Jello) buys Wed. 3:30-3:45 p.m. 
portion of Bob Crosby Show on CBS-TV starting March 
3, Mon.-thru-Fri. 3:30-4, thru Young & Rubicam . . . 
Lucky Strike to sponsor -leak Benny Show on alt. weeks, 
rather than every 3 weeks as now, on CBS-TV beginning 
in fall, 7:30-8 p.m., thru BBDO . . . Snow Crop (frozen 
foods) drops Mon.-Wed.-Fri. 10:15-10:30 a.m. sponsor- 
ship of Arthur Godfrey Time on CBS-TV . . . ABC-TV 
starts sustainer It’s About Time March 4 Thu. 8-8:30 p.m. 
as replacement for Quick as a Flash. 



Detroit Tigers games on WJBK-TV & WJBK, former thru 
Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance, latter thru W. B. 
Doner Co. . . . American Maize Co. (Amazo puddings) 
sponsors Adventures of Blinky on KNXT, Los Angeles, 
Mon.-thru-Fri. 4:15-4:30 p.m., thru Kenyon & Eckhardt 
. . . Roma Wines buys Duffy’s Tavern for 26 weeks on 
KTLA, Los Angeles, Tue. 10-10:30 p.m., thru Foote, Cone 
& Belding . . . Wine Institute, San Francisco, plans $500,- 
000 national campaign, including use of TV, beginning 
March 16, thru J. Walter Thompson . . . Cereal Institute to 
use TV-radio to promote Cereal and Milk Festival first 
week in May . . . J. J. Little & Ives Co. uses TV-radio to 
introduce 20th Century Encyclopedia to N. Y. market, thru 
Wexton Co. . . . Among other advertisers reported using 
or preparing to use TV : TreeSweet Products Co., Santa 
Ana, Cal. (frozen orange juice), thru BBDO, Los Angeles; 
Helen Pessl Inc. (Little Lady cosmetics), thru Keystone 
Adv., N. Y.; Standard Unbreakable Watch Crystal Co,, 
N. Y. (Rockety Cylinder unbreakable crystals), thru 
Friend-Reiss-McGlone, N. Y.; Jasco Aluminum Products 
Corp., New Hyde Park, N. Y. (aluminum storm windows & 
doors), thru A. M. Snider Co., N. Y.; Rolon Tire Chain Co., 
Denver, Colo. (Rolon tire chains), thru Wayne Welch Inc., 
Denver; McClelland’s, Tacoma, Wash, (Formula “B” 
deodorant cleaner), thru Gardner- Jacobson Inc., Tacoma. 



O F THE MANY station sales known to be cooking, 
only TV deal to come to fruition this week was pur- 
chase of KFOR-TV, Lincoln, Neb. (Ch. 10) for $300,000 by 
Fetzer Broadcasting Co. (Mr. and Mrs. John E. Fetzer), 
which last summer bought Lincoln’s other station, KOLN- 
TV (Ch. 12) with KOLN-AM in “distress sale” for $146,- 
000 cash, assuming $500,000 in liabilities (Vol. 9:30). 
New sale includes KFOR-TV’s equipment, no real estate. 

Seller of KFOR-TV was James Stuart, who announced 
he intends to continue operation of radio KFOR. In ap- 
plication to FCC for transfer filed this week, Fetzer also 
asked approval of plan to move KFOR-TV to KOLN-TV 
transmitter site. He intends to transfer KOLN-TV call 
letters to the newly purchased station and “make appro- 
priate disposition of Ch. 12.” Spokesman for Fetzer in- 
terests told us: “At the moment, there has been no decision 
as to how to dispose of it. If we can’t find a buyer in the 
required time, we’ll have to surrender the CP.” Fetzer 
told FCC the transfer would enable station to get network 
programs that otherwise would be unavailable to KOLN- 
TV. Fetzers also own WKZO-TV & WKZO, Kalamazoo, 
Mich, and WJEF, Grand Rapids and 33%% of WMBD, 
Peoria. KFOR-TV, an ABC affiliate, began operation last 
May; DuMont-affiliated KOLN-TV started in Feb. 1953. 

TV played a part in some AM sales consummated this 
week. Gene O’Fallon’s pioneer radio KFEL (5-kw on 560- 
kc, MBS) was sold this week to A. L. Glasmann, owner of 
KLO, Ogden, Utah and head of Inter Mountain Network, 
for sum in neighborhood of $300,000. O’Fallon organized 
KFEL in 1922, sold it to allow himself and associates “to 
devote full time to operation of KFEL-TV [Ch, 2].” 
O’Fallon also retains KFEL-FM. 

In what is probably biggest radio-only sale deal now 
cooking, Wm. Cherry interests are expected to sell inde- 
pendent WNEW, New York — reputedly one of most profit- 
able AMs in country — to group including Richard D. Buck- 
ley, ex-pres. of John Blair & Co. (station rep), Washing- 
ton attorney Horace Lohnes and Harry Playford, St. 
Petersburg banker and presently a WNEW stockholder, at 
a price in excess of $2,000,000. 

WKTY, La Crosse, Wis. (1-kw on 580-kc, MBS) was 
sold this week by La Crosse Tribune to Herbert H. Lee, 
gen. mgr. & partner in KDHI, Faribault, Minn., for $100,- 
000, leaving Tribune free to purchase 41% of stock in up- 
coming WKBT (Ch. 8) and radio WKBH, La Crosse. 



7 



C OST OF COLOR programming is still far from nailed 
down, but NBC pres. Pat V/eaver this week gave first 
inkling of what they might be by saying that production 
costs — exclusive of such costs as talent — look as if they’ll 
run 20-25% more than black-&-white. Since this excludes 
cable costs and a few others, over-all figure is still hazy, 
probably won’t be nailed down firmly for several months. 
But the 20-25% increase in “below-the-line” production 
costs may stand. 

Weaver also said that some completely different kinds 
of programs are planned for color. He wouldn’t elaborate, 
but they’re expected to start this fall. 

Barry Wood, wide-awake chief of NBC’s “color corps,” 
in recent series of speeches on color also hinted at new 
departures in color programming— wherein producers can 
build entire programs with color in mind from beginning, 
rather than “converting” existing shows to color. 

^ ^ ^ ^ 

This was “color evaluation week” on part of New 
York Herald Tribune Syndicate’s John Crosby and New 
York Times’ Jack Gould, two newsmen with color sets. 
Crosby was much taken with Feb. 23 Armstrong Circle 
Theatre featuring opera singer Jarmila Novotna. “In 
black-&-white,” he said, “this would have been a rather 
ordinary half hour. In color, it was a memorable experi- 
ence.” He went on: 

“There’s always been a question in my mind whether 
color w'ould help or hinder an ordinary play. There are 
some plays, much as there are some movies, that had best 
remain in black-&-white, whose dramatic impact is height- 
ened by the austerity of black-&-white. But there’s almost 
nothing else, even John Cameron Swayze, which isn’t im- 
proved a little bit by color.” 



Critic Jack Gould is harder to please. His conclusion : 
“Once color is accepted, the familiar criterion prevails: 
Is it a good show? Not: Is it in color?” 

He couldn’t see that color added much to Fred Allen, 
Swayze, Meet the Press, or Howdy Doody, nor did he think 
it improved “corny” Circle Theatre script, but he con- 
cluded that it added tremendously to opera Amahl and the 
Night Visitors and Hit Parade. And he noted that color 
is mighty flattering to women (Vol. 10:8). “Jinx Falken- 
burg,” he said, “demonstrated that color is going to have 
vital meaning for the ladies. With color, fashions at long 
last come alive in TV. The same goes for fabrics, cur- 
tains, etc. And, perhaps most pertinently, for food.” 

Gould is also powerfully impressed by color commer- 
cials, saying: “The advertisers are going to be the chief 
beneflciaries of color TV. Every product seen thus far has 
been infinitely more attractive in color than in mono- 
chrome. Color makes for true product identification in a 
way all the words of an announcer cannot equal.” 

From an entirely different approach comes another 
evaluation of color commercials. Kenneth Bache, writing 
in Feb. 26 Retailing Daily, reports his reactions to seeing 
Armstrong floor-covering commercials: 

“In color TV, the floor coverings industry — and con- 
ceivably the entire home furnishings industry — will have 
a selling medium contrasting almost as sharply with black- 
&-white TV as the latter does with radio today . . . 

“In the floor coverings flsld particularly, it has long 
been recognized and scientifically substantiated that color 
is a primary factor in the consumer’s buying decision. 
The same thing applies, to a large degree, in such related 
merchandise as draperies, furniture, lamps, china and 
decorative accessories.” 



Color Trends & Briefs: Color clinics for servicemen 
and dealers are getting unprecedented attendance. After 
reading our report on Washington example (Vol. 10:8), 
Jack Swift, Hoffman Sales Corp., Kansas City, writes: 

“I have never seen anything like the jam they have 
here, getting heavier each week since we began Feb. 9. 
Tonight there are 580 men packed into the factory display 
room, each hovering attentively over every word as David 
Doss gives them a detailed lecture, with illustrations and 
demonstrations on a Hoffman color receiver. About 100 
others were turned away. 

“We will repeat this class, the second lesson of the 
13-week course, Thursday night and vnll have, as we did 
last week, a different group of 500-600 in heie. In addi- 
tion, more than 1000 other dealers and technicians of all 
brand affiliations have written asking to be put on the 
mailing list to receive the correspondence course that Dess 
is writing and mailing out to these as well as to everyone 
who attends the school.” 

♦ • ♦ ♦ 

First manufacturer to break with ads offering color 
sets will be Westinghouse, with nearly full pages in New 
York Times and Herald Tribune next week. Selling for 
$1295, sets will be 15-in. mahogany full-door consoles, with 
“immediate delivery” stressed. Ads will include list of 
dealers carrying sets — 46 in New York, 14 in New Jer- 
sey. Westinghouse now has color production line running 
at Metuchen, N. J. plant, will show it to press March 9. 

Color slide scanner of WMAR-TV, Baltimore, is be- 
ing put to good use. It has produced its first commercial 
— beer slide before CBS’s weekly Fri. 5:30-6 program. 
Station also carries short still “documentaries,” such as 
slides taken by Annapolis midshipmen during South 
American cruise. Another set of color slides will be shot 
by WMAR-TV cameraman at Baltimore Orioles spring 
training in Yuma, Ariz. 



Move to revitalize UHF TV Assn, has been initiated 
by group’s counsel Wm. A. Roberts. In letter to all asso- 
ciation members he proposed New York meeting of uhf 
telecasters, grantees and networks in late March with 
these objectives: (1) Reconsideration of groups pur- 

pose & objectives. (2) Election of permanent officers. 
(3) Adoption of plans to finance organization. (4) “The 
necessity for legislative assistance.” (5) “The develop- 
ment of a comprehensive petition to the FCC seeking a 
revision of its policies with respect to uhf.” Association 
has been inactive since Feb. 1, when its funds were ex- 
hausted. Group’s pres. Lou Poller, principal owner & gen. 
mgr. of WCAN-TV, Milwaukee (Ch. 25), this week wrote 
Sen. Johnson (D-Colo.) urging Congress to impose “‘little 
freeze’ to take effect immediately in all markets where uhf 
is in operation and vhf applications are pending.” Writ- 
ing on own behalf and not for UHF Assn., he said “it 
would be hopeless to reason with FCC along these lines.” 

Patrick Campbell, TV producer and former Don Lee- 
Mutual v.p., named radio-TV officer of U. S. overseas in- 
formation program for Europe, with specific task of con- 
centrating on wider use of TV in Western Europe. Ap- 
pointment was made by United States Information 
Agency, headed by Theodore C. Streibert, ex-pres. of 
WOR-TV & WOR and ex-MBS chairman. 

Voice of Democracy contest, one of industry’s best 
cooperative efforts, climaxed this week with presentation 
in Washington of awards to the 4 students who wrote 
best scripts on subject “I Speak for Democracy.” More 
than 1,000,000 students participated this year in the con- 
test sponsored by NARTB, RETMA and U. S. Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. 

RCA’s fourth seminar for station engineers, et ah, was 
conducted at Camden this week with record 114 attend- 
ance— 22 from NBC, 15 CBS, 18 WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, 
7 AT&T, 2 CBC, majority from individual stations. 



Trade Report 
February 27, 1954 



PREDICTIONS ON COLOR FOR NEXT 5 YEARS: Just how large color bulks in coming 5 years 
is underscored in March Fortune Magazine article, "Upheaval in Home Goods," based on 
new survey for Fortune by consulting economists Boni, Watkins, Mounteer & Co. Inc ., 
36 Wall St., New York. Prepared by executive v.p. Dr. A. R. Oxenfeldt, report pre- 
dicts 18,000,000 color sets in use by end of 1959 , or one out of every 3 in use at 
that time. Year-by-year breakdown; 

About 1,000,000 color sets v;ill be sold at retail in 1955, at average price 
of $700 ; 2,500,000 at $540 in 1956 ; 4,000,000 at $450 in 1957 ; 5,300,000 at $400 in 
1958 ; 5,000,000 at $350 in 1959. About 200,000 sets will be turned out this year, 
report forecasts, but doesn't say how many will be sold. 

Sales of black-&-white sets will gradually decline during 5-year period until 
they total about 1,000,000 units a year, at average retail price of $200 in 1959, 
report says. But the total of combined color and monochrome sales during 5 years 
will be "well over $2 billion annually. " 

Some 53,000.000 sets will be in use by 1959 , report forecasts, not taking 
into consideration any widespread development of 2-set market (it predicts fewer 
than 6,000,000 families will own both color and black-&-white by 1959). 

An earlier forecast by same firm (Vol. 9:30) estimated 50,000 color set sales 
in 1954; 800,000 in 1955; 1,600,000 in 1956; 3,500,000 in 1957. Same report foresaw 
sales of 7,000,000 TVs in 1954, 7,510,000 in 1955, 7,410,000 in 1956, 7,950,000 in 
1957, modifying that to predict 5,250,000 in 1954 if a "moderate recession" occurs. 

,* * * 

Possibility of modest production increases in next 4 months is foreseen by 
all major manufacturers in wake of RETMA statistics showing nearly 750,000 TVs sold 
at retail during Jan. (compared to 640,000 last Jan.) and continued good business in 
Feb. Admiral , RCA , Philco and Motorola spokesmen all said they felt confident they 
could boost output. How much production would be Increased they wouldn't say, but 
all agreed they wouldn't "go overboard" and repeat overproduction errors of past. 

Production for year through Feb. 19 stood at about 745,000, with inventories 
at about 1,700,000 at all levels on that date. One highly-placed industry research 
expert pointed out that sales from factory to distributor during that period ex- 
ceeded production, stressing need for higher output . He predicted some 500,000 TVs 
would be sold at retail in Feb. and that retail sales in first quarter would exceed 
the 1,800,000 sold in first quarter of 1953. 

* * ♦ ♦ 

Some chance of small price increases might also be forthcoming if business 
continues good, same sources hinted. To a man, they agree nobody's making money at 
current low prices ($140 and up for 17-in., $180 for 21-in.) and fear is that small 
manufacturers lacking diversification will be forced out of business by price cuts. 

Motorola's Robert W. Galvin let out some hints on prices this week, telling 
Bureau of Home Appliances in San Diego that industry's profit is low or non-existent 
and must be " dealt with constructively " in months ahead. He added "there is not 
room enough for us to operate" within the present price structure. 

Turning to color , Galvin predicted not more than 100,000 color sets will be 
produced this year out of some 5,500,000 total, with 19-in. tube making debut within 
6 months. And he said color would entail new merchandising problems, declaring: 

" Color is harder to work with than black-& - whit e ; service costs are substan- 
tially greater, and those willing to pioneer it will be obliged to invest more money 
since it will take more capital to sell color. Your turnover will be less because 
the price will be high and there will be some sales resistance. But color is going 
to be worth the profits it will bring." 




- 9 - 

TV production totaled 110,544 week ended Feb. 19 . compared to 107,702 preced- 
ing week and 107,853 week ended Feb. 5. Radio output declined for 8th straight week, 

totaling 173,833, compared to 190,207 week ended Feb. 12 and 192,523 week before. 

RETMA revised Jan, production total this week to 420,571, of which 120,299 

were uhf-equipped at factory. It compared with Jan. 1953 output of 719,234. Radio 

output in Jan. was revised to 871,981 vs. 1,093,142 year ago. 



Trade Personals: Dr. Ralph Down, research v.p. of Bell 

Labs, named v.p. in charge of long-range planning; he’s 
succeeded by Dr. James B. Fisk, director of physical science 
i-esearch . . . Richard L. Beam promoted to Hazeltine asst, 
v.p., reporting to engineering v.p. Orville M. Dunning . . . 
Frank Folsom, RCA president, named to special task force 
on govt, procurement by Herbert Hoover’s Commission on 
Organization of Executive Branch . . . Lewis Gordon, ex- 
Sylvania and chairman of RETMA radio tube committee, 
named pres, of newly-formed CBS International, to handle 
export sales of CBS manufacturing divs. (CBS-Columbia, 
CBS-Hytron, Columbia Records) . . . Ernest A. Marx, Du- 
Mont international div. director, left this week on inspec- 
tion tour of DuMont TV installations in Caribbean . . . 
Alfred A. Medica, ex-asst. adv. mgr., promoted to Admiral 
sales mgr. of national accounts . . . George T. Sotel named 
treas. of Sonotone Corp., Elmsford, N. Y. (electronic com- 
ponents) . . . James R. Ireland named assistant director of 
research, Indiana Steel Products Co., Valparaiso, Ind.; 
James G. Richmond named asst. mgr. of manufacturing 
div. . . . Anthony Dillon, ex-eastern sales mgr., named CBS- 
Columbia midwestern sales mgr. . . . C. E. Reiner named 
field sales mgr. of Philco’s newly-acquired Dexter div. 
(laundry equipment) . . . John Bullock, ex-Zenith Radio, 
named sales mgr. of high-fidelity div., Mitchell Mfg. Co. 
. . . John Angel, ex-sales promotion mgr. of Westinghouse 
TV-radio div., Chicago, named special asst, to sales mgr. 
R. L. Sandefur . . . R. J. McDonald named Westinghouse 
eastern sales mgr. for major appliances; M. E. banning 
southeastern; AV. A. Douglass central; R. C. Walker north- 
western; R. C. Dunson southwestern; W. T. Baker Pacific 
coast . . . John E. Nelson, ex-product mgr. of industrial & 
transmitting tubes, named central regional sales mgr. for 
GE equipment tubes, headquartering in Chicago . . . Albert 
C. Bourget named to new post of southern district mgr. of 
GE replacement tube sales, Wm. B. Every remains north- 
ern distiict mgr. . . . Wm. L. Cunningham, ex-Bendix 
Radio, named midwestern sales mgr. of Hammarlund Mfg. 
Co. (communications equipment). . . . Charles P. Carroll 
promoted to Hallicrafters’ director of engineering, suc- 
ceeding Harold Adler, resigned . . . Leo G. Sands, ex-Bogue 
Electric Mfg. Co., named administrator of new RCA rail- 
way communications equipment sales dept. . . . Harold N. 
Beveridge named mgr. of Raytheon equipment div. opera- 
tions, Chicago. 



RETMA’s special committee on spurious radiation, 
authorized last week to develop industry program for vol- 
untary suppression of TV receiver radiation (Vol. 10:8) — 
which it will present to FCC for approval — will be headed 
by GE’s Dr. W. R. G. Baker, director of RETMA’s engi- 
neering dept. Other members named by RETMA chair- 
man Robert C. Sprague: A. Blumenkrantz, General Instru- 
ment Co.; K. A. Chittick, RCA Victor; Leonard F. Cramer, 
Avco (Crosley) ; T. T. Goldsmith Jr., DuMont; H. L. Hoff- 
man, Hoffman Radio; A. V. Loughren, Hazeltine; David 
B. Smith, Philco. Committee will hold first meeting in 
New York March .3. 

Radar Elccfronics Inc., 229 West 28th St., N. Y., for- 
merly Video Corp. of America, filed Chapter XI petition 
this week in N. Y. Federal Court, listing assets of $207,32.5, 
liabilities of $199,381. Plan offers creditors settlement of 
20 %, payable 5% cash and balance in installments. 



Shakeup in CBS manufacturing divs. continued this 
week with appointment of Admiral adv. v.p. Seymour 
Mintz as president of CBS-Columbia, succeeding David 
Cogan, who resigned from CBS-Columbia and as v.p. of 
CBS but remains on board and retains his 5236 Class A 
and 5236 B holdings in parent company. It followed by 
only 3 weeks elevation of Charles F. Stromeyer to presi- 
dency of CBS-Hytron, succeeding Bruce A. Coffin, and at 
same time Lloyd Coffin retired as treas., both retaining 
their holdings (Vol, 10:6). Cogan, who headed Air King- 
Products Co., and Coffin brothers, who headed Hytron, ob- 
tained their board seats and holdings when CBS pur- 
chased both companies in 1951. Declining comment, 
Cogan said only that he would take extended vacation and 
then planned to re-enter some phase of electronics busi- 
ness, in which case he would be forced to dispose of CBS 
stock. Mintz, who joined Admiral in 1944, will be suc- 
ceeded by Edmond I. Eger, who has handled Admiral 
account almost from company’s inception 20 years ago, 
most recently as v.p. of Russel M. Seeds Co., Chicago. 
For 25 years he operated his own agency, Cruttenden & 
Eger, Chicago. 

Westinghouse organized credit subsidiary capitalized 
at $10,000,000 this week to provide additional financial 
assistance to dealers to “meet stiffen competition,” with 
fiist office due to open in April to serve Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Indiana, New 
York & Maryland. New organization will supplement 
6-year-old Westinghouse equity plan under which some 
4500 banks provide local financing, announced pres. Gwyl- 
im A. Price. He said goals of new organization were to 
help dealers market new consumer products, including TV- 
radio, and increase sales of established lines, explaining: 
It is expected to achieve these goals by making maximum 
credit available to dealers, by offering financing for in- 
stallment buying sufficiently flexible to meet varying eco- 
nomic conditions, and by providing financial aid for special 
promotions where such aid is not now available.” Philco 
last month set up similar financing subsidiary for its 
dealers (Vol. 10:4). 

RETMA lists 28,468,818 TVs shipped to dealers from 
1946 through 1953 in special cumulative state-by-state and 
county-by-county tabulation released this week. Total 
doesn’t include 45,308 TVs shipped to Hawaii and 2330 to 
Alaska last year, first time those territories took any sets. 
Over 62% of shipments went to 6 states: New York 
4,100,448; Pennsylvania, 2,647,072; California, 2,611,984; 
Ohio, 2,236,969; Illinois, 2,048,620; New Jersey, 1,462,698; 
Michigan, 1,386,542; Massachusetts, 1,257,588. 

Radio shipments to dealers (excluding auto radios) 
totaled 7,243,073 last year, up from 7,066,794 in 1952, ac- 
cording to state-by-state and county-by-county report re- 
leased this week and available from RETMA on request. 
Shipments in 1951 were 7,688,810. 

Sylvania TV plant at Batavia, N. Y. (Ned Maradino, 
mgr.), which company claims to be world’s largest factory 
devoted exclusively to TV production (400,000-sq. ft. of 
floor space), starts operation March 22. Buffalo plant 
will continue to turn out TVs and radios. Also this week, 
Sylvania announced purchase of 12-acre tract at Dunn- 
ville, Ont., where TV factory will be built, with set pro- 
duction due to begin in August. 



10 



Topics & Trends of TV Trade: TV industry’s em- 
phasis on table models has one group of manufacturers 
rubbing their hands in glee — the TV table makers, who 
foresee a 20% increase in dollar sales volume this year 
over 1953, when $50,000,000 worth of tables were sold at 
retail, including those used basically for TV (without 
tops) and so-called dual-purpose wood tables, which can 
be used for TV and other purposes. 

Featuring ads declaring “every table model has to 
have a table,” manufacturers are going after TV business 
this year as never before. Two of biggest in field are 
Universal Co., High Point, N. C. (Murray Abeles and 
C. A. Troutman, partners) and National Teletable Corp., 
New York (C. A. Clinton, pres.). Clinton said Jan. busi- 
ness in industry was about 20% over year ago. 

Trend in TV tables has been shifting to wrought 
iron, in keeping with increased purchases of wrought iron 
living room furniture. They sell for about $6 and up. 

♦ 4c ♦ 

Citing RCA practice of non-discrimination in hiring 
and promotions since 1919, pres. Frank M. Folsom this 
week testified before Senate Labor Subcommittee in sup- 
port of bill for national Fair Employment Practices Com- 
mittee. He said: “From the standpoint of good business, 
it is worth re-emphasizing that the policy of hiring people 
for what they can do, rather than for who they may hap- 
pen to be, is hardly sentimental indulgence. The products 
manufactured for competitive trade are as good as the 
manpower that makes them, and the consumer is not con- 
cerned about whether the hands that made an item are 
black or white, or whether the maker goes to one church 
or another.” 

Canadian Westinghouse moves TV-radio div. from 
Hamilton to Brantford, Ont. in May, will occupy 130,000- 
sq. ft. plant leased from Behr-Manning Ltd. for TV-radio 
output. Spokesman said move was designed to improve 
production efficiency. Hamilton plants will be used for 
electronics and defense production projects. No changes 
in executive staff will be made, according to pres. H. H. 
Rogge. 

RCA cut price of its basic industrial TV unit ITV-5A 
from about $5000 to $3985. Price includes camera, vidi- 
con tube, combination control monitor & power supply 
unit and RCA installation supervision. RCA said reduc- 
tion was made possible by increased sales volume and 
more efficient manufacturing procedures. 

Fighting “bootleg” label, National Assn, of Discount 
Merchants was formed last week in N. Y., with offices 
at 551 Fifth Ave., with avowed purposes of counteracting 
unfavorable publicity and acting as clearing house for 
information on legislative actions affecting discount 
houses. At first meeting it set as first goal adoption of 
code of ethics for discount merchants. 

High Fidelity Institute of the Electronic Industries 
is new association formed in Los Angeles “to work for 
uniformity of technical standards for the high fidelity 
industry, new and increased markets, equitable trade 
practices, effective promotional methods.” Jerome J. Kahn, 
ex-Standard Transformer Corp. was named to top office 
of temporary commissioner. 

Drive to remove 10% excise tax on color sets — and 
eliminate or reduce it on black-&-white — will be launched 
by RETMA TV industry committee at special meeting in 
Washington March 4. RETMA cited tradition of deferring 
tax on new industries and products, pointing out it wasn’t 
applied to TV sets until fall of 1950. 

Promotion: Harry Alter Co., Chicago Crosley-Bendix 
distributor, gave crisp $10 bill to every dealer visiting his 
showrooms this week to see new $140 Crosley Super V 
(Vol. 10:7). Only hitch: one $10 bill to a dealer. 



Distributor Notes: RCA appoints Perry Shankle Co., 
1801 So. Flores St., San Antonio, confinning report of last 
week (Vol. 10:8), replacing Straus-Frank Co., now Syl- 
vania distributor; RCA also names J. A. Walsh & Co., 4301 
Freeway, Houston (James A. Walsh, pres.) . . . Motorola 
appoints Kenrow-Georgia Inc., 451 Bishop St., Atlanta . . . 
CBS-Columbia names Appliance Distiubutors Inc., 2 No. 
West 11th St., Oklahoma City (Philip Bird, pres.); Gill- 
Brand Products, 195 Middle St., Portland, Me. (David Gill- 
man, pres.) and Tedesco Inc., 133 Richmond Ave., Syracuse 
(L. B. Tedesco, pres.), latter ex-Hallicrafters outlet . . . 
Emerson appoints Frank Lyon Co., 816 McNeil St., Shreve- 
port, La. (Lewis Anderson, pres.) . . . Raytheon appoints 
Walter F. Slagle & Co., 725 So. Broadway, Denver (Walter 
F. Slagle, pres.) and Roger Penick Co., 1006 Washington 
Ave., Houston (Roger Penick, owner) . . . Admiral Distrib- 
utors Inc., San Francisco, appoints Helmuth Tamberg gen. 
sales mgr. . . . RCA Victor Distributing Corp., Rochester, 
N. Y., promotes George Tanty to gen. sales mgr. . . . Meek 
TV appoints Service Electrical Supply Co., Pittsburgh; 
A.B.C. Distributing Co., Providence; Hedahl Motor Supply, 
Bismarck; Wyeth & Co., St. Joseph, Mo.; Hausam Co., 
Sedalia, Mo.; Central Electric Supply Co., Fulton, Mo.; 
A-T Wholesale Supply Co., Moorhead, Minn.; Robinson 
Motor Co., Winona, Minn.; John E. Larrabee Co., Amster- 
dam. N.Y. 

RCA’s Award of Merit was bestowed recently on 4 
engineers credited with important contributions to develop- 
ment of color TV: Wallace M. James, engineering mgr., 
receiving tube & transistor operations div., for tube work; 
Robert K. Lockhart, Camden engineer, for circuits; John 
W. Wentworth, Camden, terminal design & color projects 
group, for courses on color TV and notes used as handbook; 
Steven Slasuk, RCA Service Co., for test equipment used 
in installation of home color receivers. Sixteen other sal- 
aried employes, 2 of them women, won Award of Merit, 
with gold watches, at ceremonies addressed by pres. Frank 
Folsom. 

Fabulous electronic future in which TV screens may 
be hung like pictures on a wall, connected to receiver by 
a tiny wire, was foreseen last week by GE chairman Philip 
D. Reed in address to Boston Ad Club. As for immediate 
future, he said GE’s ad budget for calendar 1954 probably 
will be largest in its history, necessarily so because “we’re 
back in a buyer’s market, which is a very healthy condi- 
tion, with competitive pressures very great, and evei’yone 
having to sell hard.” 

Danish TV is now in regular operation, having been 
on experimental basis from June 1, 1949 to Jan. 10, 1954. 
First transmitter, 400 watts, now beams 4 hours of pro- 
gramming weekly from Copenhagen’s Radio House, to be 
expanded to 6 hours by April 1, and 8 hours next summer. 
Denmark plans 7 govt.-owned TV stations, financed by 
license fees paid by receiver owners, 4 of them to start 
within next 3 years. On Jan. 31 there were 1157 licensed 
TV sets in Denmark. 

Raytheon will build new electronic engineering and re- 
search lab in Wayland, Mass, if town’s zoning laws can be 
changed to permit consti’uction. Pres. C. F. Adams Jr. 
said new plant will eventually employ about 1500, will have 
110,000-sq ft. of floor space. Also this week, Raytheon 
announced it would close TV parts plant at Oelwein, la. 
March 1 and transfer work to main plant in Chicago. 

Slide-rule “Picture Tube Selector,” giving at-a-glance 
information on interchangeability and characteristics of 
more than 136 picture tube types, is available from Du- 
Mont tube distributors. 

Federal Telephone & Radio, Clifton, N. J., subsidiary 
of IT&T, discontinues manufacture of picture tubes, plans 
to expand operations and to diversify output this year. 




I 



Vhl & Uhf Survey 

TV SET OWNERSHIP BY COUNTIES 



As of November 1, 1953 

Total Families & Receivers, By Geographic Areas, States & Counties 

Prepared for CBS-TV by A. C. Nielsen Co. Under Direction of Oscar Katz, CBS-TV Director of Research 



I 



Last May CBS Television issued the first county- 
byK:ounty report of television ownership. Demand 
for copies was so great that a second printing was 
required within a few weeks. 

But aside from the industry’s evident need for 
up-to-date and accurate ownership figures by county, 
there is another reason for a current report: 

In the six months between May and November, 
the number of station markets has doubled; and 
television counties have increased by almost 50 per 
cent. The number of additional sets— almost four 
million— would make a whole mass medium by them- 
selves. And the period marked the real beginning of 
UFfF television. 

The .May 1 report was based on statistical pro- 
jections. But because of the increasing importance 
of ownership figures, we commissioned the A. C. 
Nielsen Company to conduct an actual national tele- 
vision set survey. It includes the first national count 
of UHF television sets. 

This research was based on a sample of 100,000 



INTRODUCTION 

families, selected by area sampling techniques. The 
details of the research method are presented in the 
Appendix. 

The following definitions apply in all the tables 
appearing in this book: 

Total families; “Sales Management” estimates of 
total families in each county as of November 1, 1953. 

TV families: The number of families with television 
sets ( VHF, UHF or both) in each county on Novem- 
ber 1, 1953 as determined by this survey. These 
figures are reported individually by county only if 
10 per cent or more of all families in a county report 
having a television set. 

VHF families; The number of families with televi- 
sion sets equipped to receive a L’HF signal. These 
figures are reported only if 10 per cent or more of 
all the families in a county report having a UHF set 

TV counties: Counties with at least 10 per cent set- 
owning families. 



Other counties; Counties which have less than 10 
per cent television ownership. For each state, these 
counties are reported as a group. 

The following symbols are used throughout the 
book: 

^Indicates a county wbich is part of a Nielsen cluster, 
i.e., a group of two or more adjacent counties used 
as a sampling unit. In this report, the percentage of 
television set ownership for the cluster has been 
applied to each of the counties within the cluster. 

Indicates a television county in which there is some 
UHF but less than 10 per cent of all families, and 
hence the figure on UHF ownership is not reported 
separately. The number of LIHF families for such a 
county is, however, included in state totals. Because 
of this, the state total of UHF families in television 
counties can exceed the sum of the individually- 
reported county figures. 

LT Indicates less than 1%. 



SURVEY TECHNIQUES 



This is a brief description of the techniques used to 
determine television set ownership as of November 1, 
1953. Additional detail is available on request. 

Background: In May, 1952, the A. C. Nielsen Com- 
pany conducted a study (Nielsen Coverage Service, 
Spring 1952) which measured television set owner- 
ship by individual counties with a relatively large 
population, and by clusters of two or more less pop- 
ulous counties. This study was based on interviews 
with approximately 100,000 homes located in every 
county of the United States, and selected by prob- 
ability sampling techniques developed (and exe- 
cuted ) in collaboration with the U.S. Census Bureau. 
F.very effort was made to minimize non-response 
bias by the use of call-backs on the “not-at-home” 
and by special mailings to the small percentage of 
families not reached by personal interviews. No 
UHF stations were in operation at the time of this 
study. 



In May, 1953, the CBS Television Research De- 
partment made this study the basis of a report called 
“U.S. Television Ownership by Counties.” 

Present Study: The present study consists funda- 
mentally of a re-survey of the 100,000-homes panel 
to determine changes in television set ownership 
status that have occurred since May, 1952. For this 
purpose, the sample was divided into three groups: 

Croup A 72,561 non-owners as of May, 1952. This group 
was surveyed to measure new television set 
ownership fVHF or VHF) since that date. 

Croup R 13,133 owners as of May, 1952 within range of 
one or more VHF signals by November, 1953. 
This group was surveyed to measure conversion 
to, or acquisition of, VHF equipment. 

Croup C 13,491 owners as of May, 1952 beyond the range 
of VHF in November, 1953. It was assumed that 
the set ownership status of this group had re- 
mained unchanged, and hence, the group was not 
re-surveyed. 



Groups A and B were reached by a first-class 
mailing sent on October 15 and 16, 1953. This mail- 
ing consisted of a letter asking for cooperation in 
supplying the requested information, a return reply 
card, and a letter opener sent as a premium. On 
October 19 and 20, a follow-up reminder and “thank 
you” containing a duplicate reply card was mailed 
to each family. By November 9, the closing date set 
for mail returns, usable replies had been received 
from 54,233 of the 85,694 cases in Groups A and B. 
This represented a return of 63.3%. 

The 54,233 families who replied in Groups A 
and B combined with 13,491 families in Group C 
brought the total number of cases whose set owner- 
ship status had been determined as of November, 
1953, to 67,724, or 68.3% of the over-all panel. 

The figures as reported in this booklet represent 
the information gathered from these 67,724 cases 
adjusted for two types of bias: 

(1) non-response bias — i.e. the possibility that the 



Extra Copies of this Report are available at $1 each; 10 copies, $7.50; 25 copies, $12.50; more than 50 copies, 35e each. 



1 



television set ownership of the non-repliers differed 
from that of the repliers: 

t 2 I exaggeration bias— i.e. the possibility that some 
of the repliers had incorrectly reported acquisition 
of a television set since May of 1952. Separate 
studies, described below, were conducted to deter- 
mine these two factors. 

Study of Mon-Repliers; \ ,5,000 cross-section 
sample of the non-repliers was selected for further 
follow-up. Approximately a week after the closing 
date for mail returns, an additional mailing went 
forward to these families including another return 
reply card and fifty cents in coins as an extra pre- 
mium. Intensive efforts— by mail, telephone, and 
personal interview— were then made to reach those 
who did not reply to this appeal. In this way, infor- 
mation was finally received from close to 75% of 
the sample of non-repliers. 

The degree of television set acquisition of repliers 



and non-repliers was compared for groups of coun- 
ties classified according to various characteristics 
such as county population. It was found that the 
greatest statistical variance in television acquisition 
occurred when the repliers and non-repliers were 
compared in terms of whether they came from coun- 
ties in which the mail return had been high, medium, 
or low (county response level). Consequently, this 
breakdown was used to adjust for the non-repliers. 
The adjustment factors were arrived at as follows: 



TV set Ownership adjustment 

since May 1952 factor for 

county response level repliers non^repliers non-repliers 



High (66.8% and over) 26.3% 25.2% .96 

Medium (50.07o-66.7%) 32.17o 33.47o 1.04 

Low (under 50.07o) 27.2%> 28.6% 1.05 



For each county or county-cluster, the appropriate 
factor was applied to the rate of television set acqui- 
sition among the repliers to obtain an acquisition 
rate for the non-repliers. In this manner, possible 
bias resulting from non-response was minimized. 



Study of Exafigeration: During the same lime that 
the non-response study was being conducted, 1,000 
telephone calls were made to a sample of those who 
had indicated that they had become television fam- 
ilies since .May of 1952. The purpose of this survey 
was to measure the extent of exaggeration in the 
affirmative answers to the question of television 
ownership in the mail study. Consequently, in order to 
disassociate the two studies, the telephone calls were 
made in the name of a different research organiza- 
tion. The telephone survey w as ostensibly a study of 
viewing. The interviewer started out by asking; “Is 
your television set turned on?” and then continued 
regarding the channel or program being watched, 
and the channels that could be received. As a result 
of this questioning, it developed that 1.8% of the 
families had exaggerated in their claim of becoming 
television set owners since May, 1952. This factor 
was applied to the results obtained from the mail 
study to adjust for exaggeration. 



TELEVISION OWNERSHIP BY GEOGRAPHIC AREA 



area & state total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


Georgia 


955,500 


389,720 


41 


14,720 


2 














Maryland 


732,600 


588,650 


80 


640 


LT 


ypic England 


2,829.500 


1,985,130 


ro% 


98,820 


3% 


North Carolina 


1,056,400 


395,960 


37 


25,890 


2 














South Carolina 


554,600 


194,410 


35 


44,780 


8 


Connecticut 


630,300 


479,210 


76 


43,970 


7 


Virginia 


919,100 


510,970 


56 


43,900 


5 


Maine 


260,000 


67,970 


26 


14,520 


6 


West Virginia 


529,600 


229,320 


43 


35,990 


7 


Massachusetts 


1,424,300 


1,109,610 


78 


40,^0 


3 














New Hampshire 


162,600 


84,690 


52 






E. South Central 


3,158,100 


1,135,140 


36% 


117,240 


4% 


Khode Island 


243,800 


217,720 


89 


















Vermont 


108,500 


25,930 


24 






Alabama 


824,700 


280,470 


34 


42,440 


5 














Kentucky 


830,100 


354,110 


43 


23,500 


3 


Middle Atlantic 


9,470,400 


7,364,050 


78% 


335,660 


4% 


Mississippi 


587,400 


119,370 


20 


31,980 


5 














Tennessee 


915,900 


381,190 


42 


19,320 


2 


New Jersey 


1,568,100 


1,374,790 


88 


7,850 


1 














New York 


4,800,100 


3,712,620 


77 


69,950 


1 


ff . South Central 


4,430,700 


1,761,350 


40% 


113,870 


3% 


Pennsylvania 


3,102,200 


2,276,640 


73 


257,860 


8 


























Arkansas 


535,500 


102,020 


19 


19,690 


4 


E. North Central 


9,709,700 


6,556,390 


68% 


473,790 


5% 


Louisiana 


790,100 


278,770 


35 


45,260 


6 














Oklahoma 


692,300 


312,040 


45 


5,170 


1 


Illinois 


2,828,700 


1,862,390 


66 


122,700 


4 


Texas 


2,412,800 


1,068,520 


44 


43,750 


2 


Indiana 


1,294,700 


799,700 


62 


97,490 


8 














Micliigan 


2,023,500 


1,417,930 


70 


59,120 


3 














Ohio 


2,517,800 


1,957,490 


78 


85,380 


3 


Mountain 


1,650,300 


521,050 


32%: 






isconsin 


1,045,000 


518,880 


50 


109,100 


10 


Arizona 


253,100 


107,570 


43 


















Colorado 


456,100 


1%,790 


43 






W. Sorth Central 


4,472,900 


1,935,170 


43% 


133,070 


3% 


Idaho 


180,100 


24,820 


14 


















Montana 


197,700 


9,100 


5 






Iowa 


826,700 


399,770 


48 


3,990 


LT 


Nevada 


60,600 


11,930 


20 






Kansas 


662,400 


212,600 


32 


50,570 


8 


New Mexico 


202,000 


43,770 


22 






Minnesota 


900,000 


437,020 


49 


13,520 


2 


Utah 


207,600 


120,320 


58 






Missouri 


1,306,300 


677,160 


52 


64,990 


5 


Wyoming 


93,100 


6,750 


7 






■Nebraska 


427,.300 


177,410 


42 


















North Dakota 


161,200 


13,320 


8 


















South Dakota 


189,000 


17,890 


9 






Pacific 


5,404,800 


3,329,020 


62%, 


252,010 


5% 














California 


4,029,500 


2,809,640 


70 


108,540 


3 


South Atlantic 


6,065,100 


2,919,200 


48% 


250,230 


4% 


Oregon 


546,500 


132,320 


24 


115,170 


21 


Delaware 


101,600 


75,110 


74 






Washington 


828,800 


387,060 


47 


28,300 


3 


Dist. of Columbia 


246,900 


197,710 


80 


















Florida 


%8,800 


337,350 


35 


84,310 


9 


V. S. Total 


47,191,500 


27,506,500 


58% 


1,774,690 


4% 



TELEVISION OWNERSHIP BY STATE 



state 


total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


Arkansas 


535,500 


102,020 


19 


19,690 


4 


Alabama 

Arizona 


824,700 

253,100 


280,470 34% 

107,570 43 


42,440 5% 


California 

Colorado 


4,029,500 

456,100 


2,809,640 

196,790 


70 

43 


108,540 


3 



2 



Connecticut 


630,300 


479,210 


76 


43,970 


7 


Delaware 


101,600 


75,110 


74 






Dist. of Columbia 


246,900 


197,710 


80 






Florida 


968,800 


337,350 


35 


84,310 


9 


Georgia 


955,500 


389,720 


41 


14,720 


2 


Idaho 


180,100 


24,820 


14 






Illinois 


2,828,700 


1,862,390 


66 


122,700 


4 


Indiana 


1,294,700 


799,700 


62 


97,490 


8 


Iowa 


826,700 


399,770 


48 


3,990 


LT 


Kansas 


662,400 


212,600 


32 


50,570 


8 


Kentucky 


830,100 


354,110 


43 


23,500 


3 


Louisiana 


790,100 


278,770 


35 


45,260 


6 


Maine 


260,000 


67,970 


26 


14,520 


6 


Maryland 


732,600 


588,650 


80 


640 


LT 


Massachusetts 


1,424,300 


1,109,610 


78 


40,330 


3 


Michigan 


2,023,500 


1,417,930 


70 


59,120 


3 


Minnesota 


900,000 


437,020 


49 


13,520 


2 


Mississippi 


587,400 


119,370 


20 


31,980 


5 


Missouri 


1,306,300 


677,160 


52 


64,990 


5 


Montana 


197,700 


9,100 


5 






Nebraska 


427,300 


177,410 


42 






Nevada 


60,600 


11,930 


20 






New Hampshire 


162,600 


84,690 


52 







New Jersey 


1,568,100 


1,374,790 


88 


7,850 


1 


New Mexico 


202,000 


43,770 


22 






New York 


4,800,100 


3,712,620 


77 


69,950 


1 


North Carolina 


1,056,400 


395,960 


37 


25,890 


2 


North Dakota 


161,200 


13,320 


8 






Ohio 


2,517,800 


1,957,490 


78 


85,380 


3 


Oklahoma 


692,300 


312,040 


45 


5,170 


1 


Oregon 


546,500 


132,320 


24 


115,170 


21 


Pennsylvania 


3,102,200 


2,276,640 


73 


257,860 


8 


Rhode Island 


243,800 


217,720 


89 






South Carolina 


554,600 


194,410 


35 


44,780 


8 


South Dakota 


189,000 


17,890 


9 






Tennessee 


915,900 


381,190 


42 


19,320 


2 


Texas 


2,412,800 


1,068,520 


44 


43,750 


2 


Utah 


207,600 


120,320 


58 






Vermont 


108,500 


25,930 


24 






Virginia 


919,100 


510,970 


56 


43,900 


5 


Washington 


828,800 


387,060 


47 


28,300 


3 


West Virginia 


529,600 


229,320 


43 


35,990 


7 


Wisconsin 


1,045,000 


518,880 


50 


109,100 


10 


Wyoming 


93,100 


6,750 


7 






Total 


47,191,500 


27,506,500 


58% 


1,774,690 


4% 



TELEVISION OWNERSHIP BY COUNTY 



ALABAMA 



TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


UHF familUs 


Baldwin 


11,700 


2,790 


24% 


1320 


11% 


tBibb 


4.200 


2600 


62 






tBIount 


7,400 


2360 


39 






tBullock 


3.500 


600 


17 


490 


14 


Calhoun 


22300 


10360 


46 






Chambers 


10300 


3,920 


38 


• 


• 


^Cherokee 


4,100 


1,480 


36 






^Chilton 


6.900 


2310 


33 


• 


• 


♦Choctaw 


4.400 


480 


11 


• 


• 


tClarke 


6,700 


790 


12 


• 


• 


♦Clay 


3300 


1,060 


33 


• 


• 


♦Cleburne 


2,900 


1,040 


36 






Colbert 


10,900 


1.060 


10 






♦Conecuh 


4300 


620 


13 






♦Coosa 


2300 


920 


33 


• 


• 


♦Cullman 


12,400 


5,710 


46 






Dallas 


14,600 


3360 


22 


• 


• 


Da Kalb 


11,900 


2330 


20 






♦Elmore 


7.600 


1.750 


23 


• 


• 


♦Escambia 


7.700 


990 


13 






Etowah 


27.900 


13,520 


48 






♦FayMte 


4300 


910 


19 






♦ Franklin 


6,500 


1,430 


22 






♦Greene 


3.900 


660 


17 






♦Hale 


4,600 


790 


17 






Jackson 


9300 


920 


10 






Jefferson 


169,900 


110.120 


65 






♦Lamar 


3300 


720 


19 






t^auderdale 


15300 


1,550 


10 






♦Lawrence 


6300 


1,630 


25 






Lee 


11.000 


1340 


12 






♦Limestone 


8.900 


2310 


25 






♦Macon 


6,900 


1,170 


17 


980 


14 


Madison 


19.900 


4,060 


20 






♦Marengo 


7.000 


1.030 


IS 






♦Marion 


6.900 


1350 


22 






Marshall 


12,100 


2,650 


22 






Mobile 


72300 


26.940 


37 


25300 


35 


Montgoroef7 


41,900 


8340 


21 


8300 


20 


Morgan 


15,100 


4,420 


29 






♦Perry 


4300 


710 


17 






♦Picker, a 


5,400 


970 


18 






♦Randolph 


5300 


1380 


35 






Russell 


10.400 


1,770 


17 


1,770 


17 


♦Saint Gair 


6,700 


2350 


38 






♦Shelby 


7,700 


4.730 


61 






♦Sumter 


5300 


780 


15 






Talladega 


16.600 


10330 


65 






♦Tallapoosa 


9.000 


2,020 


22 


• 


• 


Tuscaloosa 


24.000 


7.090 


30 






Walker 


16300 


8310 


54 






♦Washington 


3,600 


400 


11 


• 


• 



♦Winston 


4,500 


2,070 


46% 






TV eountiet 


733,400 


278,000 


38% 


41,200 


6% 


other counties 


91300 


2,470 


3% 


1340 


1% 


total 


824.700 


280.470 


34% 


42,440 


S% 


ARIZONA 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


Maricopa 


119,400 


79370 


67% 






Pima 


54.500 


16,730 


31 






Pinal 


13300 


6340 


47 






Yuma 


9,000 


3.110 


35 






TV counties 


196,200 


105,950 


54% 






other counties 


56.900 


1,620 


3% 






total 


253.700 


I07.S70 


43% 






ARKANSAS 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


♦Arkansas 


6,800 


1,360 


20% 


680 


10% 


♦Ashley 


6,700 


1,140 


17 






♦Chicot 


6.100 


1,040 


17 






♦Clay 


7,400 


1.920 


26 






♦Conway 


4,400 


480 


11 


• 


• 


Craighead 


13,900 


8360 


59 






Crittenden 


12,700 


6,610 


52 






♦Cross 


6300 


2370 


36 






♦Faulkner 


6.700 


730 


11 


• 


• 


♦ Fulton 


2,600 


960 


37 






♦Greene 


8.000 


2,020 


25 






♦Independence 


6,400 


1,540 


24 






♦Jackson 


7.000 


1,710 


24 






♦Lawrence 


5,700 


2,090 


37 






♦Lee 


6300 


1,920 


31 






♦Little River 


2.700 


1,030 


38 






♦Lonoke 


7300 


1,440 


20 


780 


10 


♦Miller 


10.400 


3,890 


37 






Mississippi 


21,400 


14,010 


65 






♦Monroe 


5.100 


1,120 


22 






Phillips 


12,900 


4,770 


37 






♦ Poinsett 


10.000 


3,600 


36 






♦Prairie 


3.600 


720 


20 


360 


10 


Pulaski 


63,400 


10,570 


17 


10,570 


17 


♦Randolph 


4300 


1,590 


37 






♦St. Francis 


9.500 


2,920 


31 






Sebastian 


20.000 


6,930 


35 


5,700 


29 


Union 


14,700 


1,780 


12 






♦Van Buren 


2,600 


290 


11 


• 


• 


Washington 


15,600 


2,950 


19 






♦Woodruff 


4.400 


920 


21 






TV counties 


314,700 


92,580 


29% 


18,730 


6% 


other counties 


220,800 


9.440 


4% 


960 


LT 



totai 



CALIFORNIA 



Ty counties total families TV families UHF families 



Alameda 


276.900 


202,750 


73% 






♦Alpine 


100 


40 


38 






♦Amador 


3.000 


1.020 


34 






Butte 


24,100 


4.770 


20 






♦Calaveras 


3.500 


1,190 


34 






♦Colusa 


4.000 


960 


24 






Contra Costa 


103.700 


63.530 


61 






♦Eldorado 


6.200 


2.120 


34 






Fresno 


93.200 


45,460 


49 


41.120 


44% 


♦Glenn 


5.100 


1.210 


24 






Humboldt 


27.400 


4.560 


17 






Imperial 


17,300 


3,620 


21 






Kern 


80,000 


28,280 


35 


16,720 


21 


Kings 


15.000 


6,300 


42 


4.000 


27 


♦Lake 


4.700 


1.130 


24 






Lor Angeles 


1.637,600 


1.409,450 


86 






Madera 


11.800 


5,330 


45 


4,140 


35 


Marin 


31,400 


22,990 


73 






♦Mariposa 


1,400 


530 


38 






♦Merced 


22,400 


8.830 


39 


3,960 


18 


♦Mono 


700 


270 


38 






Monterey 


49.100 


20350 


41 






Napa 


15,700 


7,190 


46 






♦Nevada 


7.000 


1.830 


26 






Orange 


90,400 


71,660 


79 






Placer 


14,400 


5,660 


39 


• 


. 


♦Plumas 


4,700 


1.220 


26 






Riverside 


68.400 


39.580 


58 






Sacramento 


105,100 


51,270 


49 


15,280 


15 


♦San Benito , 


4,800 


1,920 


40 


860 


18 


San Bernardino 


107,900 


74,780 


69 


. 


. 


San Diego 


237.000 


172,220 


73 






San Francisco 


287.800 


191.990 


67 






San Joaquin 


69.100 


40,080 


58 






San Luis Obispo 


24,300 


7,550 


31 






San Mateo 


92,600 


78,050 


84 






Santa Barbara 


35,800 


16,960 


47 






Santa Clara 


107,000 


79.330 


74 






'Santa Cruz 


26..500 


7,890 


30 






♦Sierra 


500 


130 


26 






Solano 


40,300 


28,570 


71 






Sonoma 


39,900 


18.370 


46 






Stanislaus 


44,900 


17.540 


39 


• 


• 


♦Sutter 


9,100 


2,620 


29 






♦Tehama 


6,900 


1340 


18 







tTrinity 1.900 340 18 

Tulare 46.500 13,870 30 



535^00 



3 



102.020 19% 19,690 4% 



11.450 25 



■^Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


4.600 

40,300 

14.200 


1,750 

31,300 

6,000 


387o 

78 

42 


2.920 


21% 


+Yuba 


8.500 


2,470 


29 






Ty counties 
other counties 


3,974,700 

S4.800 


2,807,970 

1.670 


71% 108,540 
3% 


3% 


total 


4,029.500 


2,m,640 


70% 


lOB^iO 


3% 



COLORADO 






TV counties 


total families 


TV families VHF families 


Adams 


13.900 


10.810 


78% 


Arapahoe 


19,300 


11.050 


57 


Boulder 


16,700 


7,350 


44 


^Chaffee 


2.300 


280 


12 


^Clear Creek 


1,200 


170 


14 


I^Crowley 


1.400 


360 


26 


^Custer 


600 


70 


12 


Denver 


157,500 


97,220 


62 


■^Douglas 


uoo 


140 


12 


■•■Eagle 


1,100 


160 


15 


tElbert 


1,000 


120 


12 


El Paso 


29.700 


9,900 


33 


■•^Fremont 


5,700 


700 


12 


■•^Gilpin 


200 


30 


15 


■•^Grand 


1,000 


150 


15 


■^Jackson 


700 


no 


15 


Jefferson 


22,000 


15,990 


73 


+Lake 


1.800 


220 


12 


Larimer 


15.100 


7,920 


52 


■^Lincoln 


1,900 


240 


13 


tLogan 


5.100 


1.280 


25 


■•^Morgan 


^,400 


1,280 


24 


^Olero 


8,100 


2.110 


26 


tPark 


400 


50 


12 


^Phillips 


1,500 


380 


25 


Pueblo 


29,200 


14,050 


48 


•^Sedgwick 


1,500 


380 


25 


■^Summit 


400 


60 


15 


♦Teller 


600 


70 


12 


■•^\^'ashington 


2,400 


600 


25 


Weld 


20,300 


10,910 


54 


■f^Yuma 


3.500 


880 


25 


TV counties 


372,700 


195,040 


52% 


other counties 


83,400 


1,750 


2% 


total 


456,100 


196,790 


43% 



CONNECTICUT 

TV counties total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


Fairfield 


160,200 


119,990 


75% 


• 


• 


Hartford 


169,600 


124,110 


73 


36,990 


22% 


Litchfield 


31.500 


22,670 


72% 


• 


• 


Middlesex 


20,500 


16.820 


82 


2,220 


11% 


New Haven 


170.200 


148,310 


87 






New London 


45,400 


26,140 


58 






Tolland 


13,200 


7,930 


60 


• 


• 


Windham 


19,700 


13,240 


67 






TV counties 


630,300 


479,210 


76% 


43,970 


7% 


total"' 


630ri00 


479,210 


76% 


43^70 


7% 



DELAWARE 

TV counties total families 


TV families VHF families 


Kent 


12,800 


9,950 


78% 


New Castle 


68,300 


53,230 


78 


Sussex 


20,500 


11,930 


58 


TV counties 


101,600 


75,110 


74% 


total 


101,600 


75,110 


74% 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 




TV counties 


total families 


TV families VHF families 


D.C 


246,900 


197,710 


80% 


TV counties 


246,900 


197,710 


80% 


total 


246.900 


197,710 


80% 



FLORIDA 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families ^ 


Alachua 


16,200 


3,600 


22% 




♦Baker 


1,300 


790 


61 




Bay 


15,900 


1,710 


11 




^Bradford 


3,300 


2,010 


61 




^Brevard 


8,500 


1,110 


13 




Broward 


36,500 


26310 


72 


13,750 37% 


^Charlotte 


1,500 


180 


12 




^Citrus 


1,600 


260 


16 




♦Clay 


4300 


1,890 


44 




♦Collier 


2300 


280 


12 





■•Columbia 


5,000 


1,010 


20 






Dade 


200,100 


130330 


65 


• 


• 


+Dixie 


700 


no 


16 






Duval 


99,300 


60,720 


61 






Escambia 


35,700 


7,950 


22 


• 


• 


tFlagler 


1.000 


no 


n 






^Gilchrist 


600 


120 


20 






fGlades 


600 


60 


10 


• 


• 


■•Hamilton 


2.200 


530 


24 






■•Hendry 


1.700 


200 


12 






■•Hernando 


1,900 


300 


16 






•Highlands 


4,800 


480 


10 


• 


• 


Hillsborough 


85300 


28.380 


33% 


27,530 


32% 


^Indian River 


4300 


420 


10 


• 


• 


•Jefferson 


2,600 


620 


24 






•Lafayette 


600 


120 


20 






Lake 


12.300 


3360 


27 






♦Lee 


8.800 


1,060 


12 






•Levy 


2,900 


450 


16 






•Madison 


3.400 


770 


23 






Manatee 


12,500 


3,970 


32 


3,970 


32 


Marion 


12,000 


2.940 


25 






•Martin 


2,800 


280 


10 


• 


• 


•Monroe 


10,000 


1320 


12 






•Nassau 


3,600 


2300 


61 






•Okaloosa 


8.000 


810 


10 


• 


• 


•Okeechobee 


900 


90 


10 


• 


• 


Orange 


43.600 


4.730 


11 






•Osceola 


4300 


590 


14 






Palm Beach 


42,700 


9,790 


23 


• 


• 


•Pasco 


7300 


1.080 


15 


780 


11 


Pinellas 


70,800 


10370 


15 


10,270 


15 


•Putnam 


7,500 


3300 


44 






•St. Johns 


8,000 


3,530 


44 






•St. Lucie 


7,100 


790 


11 


• 


• 


•Santa Rosa 


5.000 


550 


11 


• 


• 


•Seminole 


8,500 


1.190 


14 






•Sumter 


3300 


480 


15 


350 


11 


•Suwannee 


4.400 


880 


20 






•Taylor 


2,900 


700 


24 






•Union 


1.100 


670 


61 






•Volusia 


27.700 


3,030 


11 






•Walton 


4,000 


440 


11 


• 


• 


TV counties 


862,800 


328,770 


38% 


80,340 


9% 


other counties 


106.000 


8,580 


8% 


3,970 


4% 


total 


968,800 


337350 


35% 


84,310 


9% 


GEORGIA 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


•Appling 


3,300 


430 


13% 






•Atkinson 


1.700 


270 


16 






•Bacon 


2300 


770 


35 






•Baldwin 


5,100 


1,410 


28 






•Banks 


1,500 


540 


36 


• 


• 


•Barrow 


3,700 


1.520 


41 






•Barlow 


7,300 


4,600 


63 






♦ Ben Hill 


4.100 


670 


16 






•Berrien 


3,300 


540 


16 






Bibb 


35,500 


11,950 


34 


6320 


19% 


•Bleckley 


2300 


600 


26 






TBrantley 


1,500 


200 


13 






•Brooks 


4,100 


780 


19 






•Butts 


2.300 


1.630 


71 


• 


• 


•Camden 


2,100 


950 


45 






•Carroll 


9.300 


4.860 


52% 






•Catoosa 


4,300 


2.620 


61 






•Charlton 


1,100 


500 


45 






Chatham 


47300 


7.790 


17 






•Chattahoochee 1,500 


240 


16 


150 


107® 


•Chattooga 


5,700 


2.310 


41 






•Cherokee 


5,500 


2,190 


40 






•Clarke 


10,600 


4,000 


38 






•Clay 


1,300 


290 


22 


• 


• 


■^Clayton 


7,400 


5,400 


73 






•Clinch 


1.500 


530 


35 






Cobb 


19,500 


13,780 


71 






•Coffee 


5,800 


1,010 


17 






•Columbia 


2,300 


480 


21 






•Coweta 


7,600 


5,500 


72 






•Crawford 


1.100 


350 


32 


• 


• 


•Crisp 


4.900 


1.470 


30 


• 


• 


•Dade 


1.700 


680 


40 






•Dawson 


600 


230 


39 






De Kalb 


45.900 


36340 


79 






•Dodge 


4,300 


1,120 


26 






•Dooly 


3,400 


1,020 


30 


* 


* 


•Douglas 


3300 


1,660 


52 






•Echols 


500 


180 


35 






♦Elbert 


4,800 


1,680 


35 


* 


* 


• Fannin 


3,800 


1,220 


32 






• Fayette 


1.900 


1.390 


73 






Floyd 


17.500 


9,040 


52 






•P'orsyth 


2,900 


1,130 


39 






•Franklin 


3.600 


1300 


36 


* 


* 



Fulton 

•Gilmer 

•Glascock 

•Glynn 

•Gordon 


144,600 

2300 

600 

8.900 

5.000 


107,930 

960 

130 

4.000 

3,050 


75 

39 

21 

45 

61 






•Greene 


3300 


1340 


39 






•Gwinnett 


8,900 


3,640 


41 






•Habersham 


4.400 


1,410 


32 






Hall 


11300 


6340 


61 






•Hancock 


2,400 


630 


27 






•Haralson 


3,900 


2.460 


63 






•Harris 


2300 


1320 


47 






♦Hart 


3,600 


1300 


36 


• 


• 


•Heard 


1.400 


730 


52 






•Henry 


3.900 


2,730 


70 






Houston 


7,000 


2300 


36 


1.590 


23 


•Irwin 


2.600 


420 


16 






•Jackson 


4,800 


1 970 


41 






•Jasper 


1,600 


590 


37 






•Jeff Davis 


2,400 


380 


16 






•Jefferson 


4,600 


910 


20 






•Johnson 


2,600 


420 


16 






•Jones 


1,600 


430 


27 






•Lamar 


2.500 


1,780 


71 


• 


• 


•Lanier 


1300 


250 


19 






•Laurens 


7,700 


2,050 


27% 






•Lee 


1300 


390 


30 


• 


• 


•Lincoln 


1300 


470 


39 






•Long 


900 


120 


13 






•Lowndes 


11,700 


2,180 


19 






•Lumpkin 


1.500 


590 


39 






•McDuffie 


3,100 


650 


21 






•Macon 


3,400 


1,050 


31 


• 


• 


•Madison 


3,000 


1,080 


36 


• 


• 


•Marion 


1,400 


310 


22 


• 


• 


•Meriwether 


5300 


3300 


73 






•Monroe 


2.600 


1350 


71 


• 


• 


•Morgan 


2.900 


1,070 


37 






•Murray 


2.600 


1.590 


61 






•Muscogee 


35,100 


5,600 


16 


3,670 


10% 


•Newton 


5300 


3,740 


71 






•Oconee 


1.600 


590 


37 






•Oglethorpe 


2.300 


900 


39 






•Paulding 


3.000 


1.890 


63 






•Peach 


3,100 


990 


32 


• 


• 


•Pickens 


2300 


900 


39 






♦Pierce 


2.600 


340 


13 






♦Pike 


1.800 


1380 


71 


• 


• 


♦Polk 


8300 


5310 


64 






•Pulaski 


2300 


570 


26 






•Putnam 


1,600 


430 


27 






•Quitman 


800 


180 


22 


• 


• 


•Rabun 


1.700 


540 


32 






•Randolph 


3300 


750 


23 


• 


• 


Richmond 


40,600 


6330 


16 • 






•Rockdale 


2300 


1340 


70 






•Schley 


700 


150 


22 


• 


• 


•Spalding 


8.900 


6330 


70 


• 


• 


•Stephens 


4.700 


1.500 


32 






•Stewart 


2300 


480 


22 


• 


• 


•Sumter 


6.500 


1.970 


30 


• 


• 


♦Talbot 


1,800 


850 


47 






•Taliaferro 


800 


310 


39 






•Taylor 


2,300 


740 


32 


• 


• 


•Telfair 


3.100 


500 


16 






•Terrell 


3,400 


1.020 


30 


• 


• 


♦Tift 


6300 


1,060 


17 






•Towns 


900 


290 


32 






Troup 


14,100 


7,640 


54 






•Turner 


2.600 


470 


18 






♦Twiggs 


1,700 


270 


16 






•Union 


1,700 


540 


32 






•Upson 


6.600 


3,140 


48 






Walker 


11300 


4.800 


43 






•Walton 


5300 


3,640 


70 






•Ware 


8,300 


2370 


35 






•Warren 


2,100 


440 


21 






•Washington 


5.100 


860 


17 






•Wayne 


3.600 


440 


12 






•Webster 


800 


180 


22 


• 




•Wheeler 


1.300 


210 


16 % 






•White 


1.400 


450 


32 






•Whitfield 


10,100 


6,190 


61 






•Wilcox 


2,500 


650 


26 






•Wilkes 


3.100 


1310 


39 






•Wilkinson 


2.400 


380 


16 






•Worth 


4,500 


810 


18 






TV counties 


845.000 


384.400 


4S% 


14,720 


2% 


other counties 


110.500 


5320 


5% 






total 


9553(W 


389.720 


41% 


J4.720 


2% 


IDAHO 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Ada 


24,700 


9,010 


36% 






•Bannock 


12,700 


1.440 


11 







4 



'^Bear Lake 


1.700 


190 


11 




+Boise 


600 


70 


11 




■•^Bonner 


4,500 


1,850 


41 




■’’Boundary 


1,600 


660 


41 




Canyon 


17.100 


3,050 


18 




■^Caribou 


2,100 


230 


11 




■•■Cleanvater 


2,200 


330 


15 




+Elmore 


2,300 


370 


16 




+Franklin 


2,600 


290 


11 




■t^Gem 


2,500 


270 


11 




■•■Kootenai 


8,200 


3.300 


40 




■^Oneida 


1,000 


no 


11 




■^Owyhee 


1,700 


290 


17 




^Payette 


3,900 


390 


10 




■•■power 


800 


90 


11 




^Shoshone 


7,100 


1,020 


14 




tWashinglon 


2,700 


290 


11 




TV counties 


100,000 


23,250 


23% 




other counties 


80,100 


1,570 


2% 




total 


180,100 


24,820 


14% 





ILLINOIS 

Ty counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Adams 


22,000 


6370 


29% 






■^Alexander 


7.000 


1310 


17 






7Bond 


4.700 


2,540 


54 


710 


\h% 


^ Boone 


5,400 


2,050 


38 


• 


• 


■^Brown 


2300 


620 


27 






^Bureau 


12300 


4,950 


41 


• 


• 


^Calhoun 


1,700 


900 


53 


• 


• 


^Carroll 


6.400 


4,860 


76 






7Cass 


4,700 


1,690 


36 






Champaign 


31300 


4,460 


14 


• 


• 


Christian 


12,800 


3,690 


29 


2,060 


16 


'Clark 


5,700 


2,000 


35 






'Clay 


5,600 


1,010 


18% 






■^Clinton 


6,900 


3,790 


55 


1,100 


157o 


Coles 


13300 


3330 


25 


• 


• 


Cook 


1,465,800 


1308.970 


82 






^Crawford 


7.400 


2380 


35 






■^Cumberland 


3300 


1,160 


35 






De Kalb 


13,000 


7320 


56 






■^De Wilt 


5,600 


590 


11 


• 


• 


■^Douglas 


5.400 


1.400 


26 






Du Page 


53,000 


44,930 


85 






^Edgar 


8,000 


2.060 


26 






^Edwards 


3.000 


570 


19 


• 


• 


■^Effingham 


6.700 


2.610 


39 






^Fayette 


7.400 


2.950 


40 






'Ford 


5300 


1,660 


32 






Franklin 


16.500 


3.900 


24 






Fulton 


14,900 


5,180 


35 


2,460 


17 


^Greene 


6300 


3340 


52 


• 


• 


^Grundy 


6300 


3.930 


62 






^Hancock 


8.700 


3.720 


43 






^Henderson 


2,700 


1,160 


43 






Henry 


15,600 


11,440 


73 






Uroquois 


10.400 


3,400 


33 






■^Jackson 


12.100 


4300 


37 


• 


• 


^Jasper 


3.900 


1370 


35 






JeOerson 


12,000 


3,900 


33 






♦Jersey 


4300 


2340 


S3 


• 


• 


♦Jo Daviess 


6300 


2,720 


40 


950 


14 


Kane 


47,000 


36,730 


78 






Kankakee 


20.100 


14370 


71 






'Kendall 


3.900 


2.420 


62 






Knox 


18300 


12.440 


68 






Uke 


57,100 


48,130 


84 






U Salle 


32,000 


8,190 


26 






♦Lawrence 


6.700 


1330 


18 


• 


• 


Lee 


10,100 


4370 


48 






Livingston 


11,400 


2.400 


21 


• 


• 


♦Logan 


8300 


1,930 


22 


1,930 


22 


♦McDonough 


9.400 


2,480 


26 






McHenry 


17.400 


11.160 


64 






McLean 


24300 


5390 


22 


4,080 


17 


Macon 


34300 


9.720 


28 


7.680 


22 


Macoupin 


14,700 


6.750 


46 


• 


• 


Madison 


60,900 


45,000 


74 


7.810 


13 


Marion 


13300 


5370 


44 


• 


• 


'Marthall 


4300 


670 


16 


460 


11 


♦Mason 


5300 


1,140 


22 


1,140 


22 


♦Menard 


3,100 


680 


22 


680 


22 


♦Mercer 


5300 


3,470 


63 






♦Monroe 


4300 


2,600 


62 


500 


12 


Montgomery 


11,000 


3,760 


34 


• 


• 


♦Morgan 


10.100 


3340 


36 






♦Moultrie 


4300 


840 


20 


710 


17 


'Ogle 


11.000 


4,160 


38 


• 


• 


Peoria 


56.700 


25,030 


44 


20310 


36 


'Perry 


7,000 


2390 


37% 


• 


• 


'Piatt 


4.400 


440 


10 


• 


• 


'Pike 


7300 


2.480 


34 






•Pulaaki 


4.400 


750 


17 






♦Putnam 


uoo 


210 


16 


140 


11% 



♦Randolph 


8,800 


5,430 


62 


1,040 


12 


♦Richland 


5.800 


1,100 


19 


• 


• 


Rock Island 


43,700 


34,900 


80 






St. Clair 


67300 


50,650 


75 


13,530 


20 


Saline 


11,000 


1,980 


18 


• 


• 


Sangamon 


44,300 


8,090 


18 


7,110 


16 


♦Schuyler 


3,300 


890 


27 






♦Scott 


2,400 


820 


34 






♦Shelby 


8.000 


1.580 


20 


1,390 


17 


'Stark 


2,800 


1,120 


40 


• 


• 


♦Stephenson 


13,600 


5,400 


40 


1,960 


14 


Tazewell 


26,100 


13,520 


52 


12,880 


49 


♦Union 


5,600 


950 


17 






Vermibon 


28,100 


5,610 


20 






'Wabash 


4,800 


910 


19 


• 


• 


♦Warren 


7.200 


4,530 


63 






♦Washington 


4.700 


2,540 


54 


710 


15 


♦ Wayne 


6,700 


1320 


18 






♦Whiteside 


16.300 


12,500 


77 






Will 


42,300 


33.670 


80 






Williamson 


16300 


3320 


23 


• 


• 


Winnebago 


52,300 


25,890 


50 


21370 


42 


♦Woodford 


6,800 


1.080 


16 


700 


11 


TV counties 


2,804,000 


1,861,010 


66% 122,700 


4% 


other counties 


24.700 


1.380 


6% 






total 


2,828,700 


1,862,390 


66% 


122,700 


4 % 


INDIANA 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Adams 


6300 


1,700 


25% 


750 


11% 


Allen 


61,500 


13,870 


23 






Bartholomew 


14300 


10320 


72 






♦Benton 


3300 


2380 


65 






♦Blackford 


4300 


1,130 


25 


500 


V 


♦Boone 


8300 


5310 


70 






♦Brown 


1300 


830 


55 






♦Carroll 


5,400 


2,970 


55 


590 


11 


Cass 


12,100 


5.760 


48 






Clark 


17.000 


12.930 


76 


3,010 


18 


♦Clay 


8,100 


2.740 


34 






♦Clinton 


10,000 


6.960 


70 






♦Crawford 


2300 


1,180 


42 






♦Daviess 


8300 


4.770 


57 






♦Dearborn 


8,000 


4,640 


58 






♦Decatur 


5,700 


3360 


59 






'DeKalb 


8,600 


2,680 


31 






Delaware 


30.700 


21330 


71 


8340 


27 


♦Dubois 


6.900 


2350 


34% 


• 


• 


'Elkhart 


28.500 


13,610 


48 


6,760 


24% 


♦Fayette 


7,600 


3.860 


51 






Floyd 


15.000 


13,050 


87 


2.040 


14 


♦Fountain 


6.100 


2360 


39 


• 


• 


♦Franklin 


4.500 


2300 


51 






♦Fulton 


5,500 


2,970 


54 


2,040 


37 


♦Gibson 


10.000 


2,720 


27 


1,610 


16 


Grant 


20300 


12,460 


62 


• 


• 


♦Greene 


9,300 


4,620 


50 






♦Hamilton 


9,600 


6.700 


70 






♦Hancock 


7.100 


4,970 


70 


• 


• 


♦Harrison 


5300 


2340 


42 






♦Hendricks 


8300 


6,560 


80 






Henry 


14,500 


8,750 


60 


• 


• 


Howard 


18300 


12,090 


66 






♦Huntington 


10,400 


1350 


12 


• 


• 


♦Jackson 


9.000 


4,990 


55 






♦Jasper 


5300 


3,440 


65 






♦Jay 


7,700 


1,910 


25 


810 


11 


♦Jefferson 


6.400 


3.760 


59 






♦Jennings 


4,100 


2,420 


59 






♦Johnson 


8,700 


6,950 


80 






Knox 


14,100 


9,120 


65 






Kosciusko 


11.100 


5,560 


50 


1.610 


15 


♦LaGrange 


4300 


2,160 


48 


1,080 


24 


Lake 


116300 


111,910 


96 


• 


• 


♦La Porte 


25,000 


19,740 


79 


• 


• 


Lawrence 


10,800 


6,160 


57 






Madison 


35300 


28360 


81 


4,920 


14 


Marion 


188300 


156390 


83 






♦Marshall 


9,700 


5.170 


53 


3,640 


37 


♦Martin 


3300 


1,620 


49 






♦Miami 


9,400 


2.730 


29 






Monroe 


14300 


8310 


58 






Montgomery 


9300 


7,190 


73 


• 


• 


♦Morgan 


7,900 


6320 


80 






♦Newton 


3.600 


2340 


65 






'Noble 


8300 


3.980 


49 


1.570 


19 


'Ohio 


1300 


770 


59 






♦Orange 


5300 


2,180 


42 






^Owen 


3300 


1.860 


49 






'Parke 


4.900 


1,910 


39 


• 


• 


♦Perry 


5300 


2,180 


42 






♦Pike 


4,600 


2,670 


58 






Porter 


13300 


10,830 


82 






♦Posey 


6.200 


1,670 


27 


990 


16 



'Pulaski 


3.900 


2.1S0 


55 


430 


a 


♦Putnam 


6.900 


2380 


33 






♦Randolph 


9.200 


5,980 


65 


• 


• 


♦Ripley 


6.000 


3340 


59 






♦Rush 


6300 


3,680 


59 






St. Joseph 


67,600 


39,250 


58 


27370 


41 


♦Scott 


4.000 


2320 


58 






♦Shelby 


9.600 


6,640 


69 


• 


• 


♦Spencer 


4,600 


1,560 


34% 


• 


• 


♦Starke 


5,100 


4,030 


79 


• 


• 


♦Steuben 


5,700 


1.770 


31 






Sullivan 


7,900 


3,910 


49 






♦Switzerland 


2.200 


1,300 


59 






Tippecanoe 


23,000 


9.170 


40 


5,430 


24% 


♦Tipton 


4,900 


3.430 


70 






♦Union 


1,900 


970 


51 






Vanderburgh 


54.900 


15,750 


29 


13,860 


25 


♦Vermillion 


7300 


2.800 


39 


• 


• 


Vigo 


35,800 


24,790 


69 






♦Wabash 


9,600 


2,760 


29 






♦W'arren 


2,800 


1,090 


39 


. 


• 


♦Warrick 


7,000 


2.340 


33 


• 


• 


Washington 


5.200 


3.020 


58 






■•^Wayne 


22,300 


14..500 


65 


• 


• 


♦Wells 


6,500 


780 


12 


• 


• 


'White 


6.100 


3380 


54 


730 


11 


♦Whitley 


6.400 


3,070 


48 


1.220 


19 


TV counties 


1,294,700 


799,700 


62% 


97,490 


8% 


total 


1,294,700 


799.700 


62% 


97.490 


8% 


IOWA 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Adair 


4,000 


1,920 


48%- 






♦Adams 


2,800 


1340 


48 






♦Allamakee 


4.700 


560 


12 






♦Appanoose 


6.300 


1,390 


22 






♦Audubon 


3,500 


1,820 


52 






♦Benton 


7300 


2,840 


39 






Black Hawk 


33.000 


11,680 


35 






♦Boone 


8,600 


5.120 


60 






♦Bremer 


5.800 


1,280 


22 






♦Buchanan 


6.100 


2,440 


40 






♦Buena Vista 


7,100 


1.710 


24 






♦Butler 


5,500 


1.270 


23 






•Calhoun 


5.-100 


1,370 


25 


• 


• 


♦Carroll 


6.600 


3,360 


51 






♦Cass 


6,300 


3.810 


60 






♦Cedar 


5.400 


4.000 


74 






Cerro Gordo 


14.600 


5,750 


39 






♦Cherokee 


5,300 


1320 


23 






♦Chickasaw 


4.500 


630 


14 






♦Clarke 


3.100 


620 


20 






♦Clay 


5,700 


970 


17 






♦Clayton 


6,800 


780 


11 






♦Clinton 


15.900 


11.990 


75 






♦Crawford 


5,700 


2,960 


52 






♦ Dallas 


7,800 


4,820 


62 


• 


• 


♦Davis 


3,100 ' 


650 


21 






♦Decatur 


3.800 


760 


20 






♦Delaware 


5.200 


2,810 


54 






Des Moines 


14,300 


9.620 


67% 






♦Dickinson 


4.000 


680 


17 






Dubuque 


20,100 


8,050 


40 






♦Emmet 


4,300 


770 


18 






♦Fayette 


8.500 


1.300 


IS 






♦Floyd 


6.900 


880 


13 






♦ Franklin 


5300 


2,810 


54 






♦Fremont 


3,700 


2,590 


70 






♦Greene 


4.900 


2.890 


59 






♦Grundy 


4.400 


2,070 


47 






♦Guthrie 


4.600 


2,850 


62 


• 


• 


♦Hamilton 


6,400 


4.420 


69 


• 


• 


♦Hancock 


4.500 


1,540 


34 


• 


• 


♦Hardin 


7,500 


5.110 


68 


• 


• 


♦Harrison 


5,800 


3,690 


64 






♦Henry 


5.000 


1,950 


35 






♦Howard 


3.900 


550 


14 


• 


• 


♦Humboldt 


4,100 


980 


24 


. 


. 


'Ida 


3..300 


760 


23 






♦Iowa 


4,<W0 


1,570 


32 






♦Jackson 


5,700 


4.330 


76 






♦Jasper 


10.200 


6.050 


59 






♦Jefferson 


5.100 


1.7.30 


34 






Johnson 


12.900 


5,460 


42 






♦Jones 


5.800 


3.160 


54 






♦ Keokuk 


5.f»00 


1.790 


32 






♦Kossuth 


7,500 


1,430 


19 






I.P.- 


13.600 


2.160 


16 






Linn 


3.5.;tOO 


19.670 


.36 






♦ Louisa 


3.100 


2,520 


74 






♦Lucas 


3,900 


780 


20 






♦ Lyon 


4.300 


i.;wo 


32 







♦ Madison 


4.300 


2,410 


56 


♦ 


• 


♦ Mahaska 


H.lOU 


2.2.S0 


28 






• Marion 


7.700 


1.540 


59 







6 



Marshall 


11^ 


6320 56 






'Mills 


3.700 


2.590 70 






'Milchell 


4.200 


590 14 






^Monona 


5.000 


3,150 63 






^Monroe 


3.400 


710 21 






’Montgomery 


5,300 


3,710 70 






’Muscatine 


10.600 


7,880 74 






’O’Brien 


6.100 


1,010 17 






’Osceola 


3.000 


510 17 






'Page 


7.300 


5.130 70 






'Palo Alio 


4.500 


810 18 






’Plymouth 


6.800 


2.180 32 






’Pocahontas 


4,600 


1,100 24 


• 


• 


Polk 


77.000 


56.140 73 


• 


• 


Pottawattamie 


21,900 


13.870 63 






’Poweshiek 


5.800 


1,620 28 






’Ringgold 


3.200 


1,540 48 






’Sac 


5.500 


1870 23 






Scott 


32.700 


27,030 83 






’Shelby 


4,600 


2.810 61 






’Sioux 


7,500 


2.300 31 






Story 


13.100 


8.420 64 


* 




’Tama 


7.000 


3,300 47 






’Taylor 


4,000 


1.920 48 






’Union 


5,100 


2.470 48 






’Van Buren 


3.700 


1.260 34 






^K'apello 


15.400 


2,100 14 






’Warren 


5,500 


3.090 56 


• 


• 


’W^ashington 


6,400 


2.040 32 






’Wayne 


3.900 


750 19 






Webster 


14.000 


9810 66 






’Winnebago 


4,000 


1,400 35 


* 


* 


’Winneshiek 


6,.300 


950 15 






Woodbury 


34.600 


21.380 62 






'Worth 


3.300 


1.160 35 


• 




’W right 


6.400 


3,440 54 






TV eountiet 


826,700 


399,770 48% 


3,990 


LT 


total 


826J00 


399,770 48% 


3,990 


LT 


KANSAS 










TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


'Allen 


6,300 


860 14% 






’Anderson 


3,400 


480 14 






’Atchison 


0.800 


3.480 51 






’Barber 


2,800 


560 20 






’Barton 


10,100 


2,850 28 






’Bourbon 


6,800 


1,650 24 






’Brown 


5.200 


2.700 52 






’Butler 


11,400 


3.340 29 


3.130 


27% 


’Chase 


1.400 


2.50 18 






’Chautauqua 


2,400 


380 16 






’Cherokee 


8,800 


850 10 






’Clay 


4.000 


440 11 






’Coffey 


3.200 


450 14 






’Comanche 


1.300 


260 20 






Cowley 


12,400 


2,070 17 






Crawford 


15.300 


1,490 10 






’Dickinson 


7.100 


680 10 






’Doniphan 


3.200 


1.660 52 






’Douglas 


10.900 


4,920 45 


* 




’Edwards 


2,100 


420 20 






'Elk 


2,100 


340 16 






’Ellsworth 


2.600 


360 14 






’Franklin 


6,700 


2,640 39 






’Geary 


7,100 


680 10 






’Greenwood 


4,400 


700 16 






’Harper 


3,300 


590 18 


• 


* 


’Harvey 


7,000 


2,100 30 


1,890 


27 


’Jackson 


3.700 


1.920 52 






’Jefferson 


3,600 


1,620 45 


* 


* 


Johnson 


28.100 


25.600 91 


2,850 


10 


’Kingman 


3300 


590 18 


• 


• 


’Kiowa 


1.500 


300 20 






’Labette 


10,400 


990 10% 






I^avcnworth 


12.000 


8,340 70 


* 


* 


’Lincoln 


1,800 


250 14 






’Linn 


3,600 


1,760 49 


• 


• 


’Lyon 


8.800 


1,680 19 






’McPherson 


7,900 


1,480 19 






’Marion 


5300 


940 18 






’Marshall 


6.000 


840 14 






^Miami 


6,300 


3,080 49 


• 


• 


Montgomery 


16,900 


2.900 17 






’Morris 


2.600 


260 10 






’Nemaha 


4,400 


660 15 






’.Neosho 


6,800 


1,700 25 






’Osage 


4,100 


1.600 39 






’Ottawa 


2.400 


340 14 






’Pawnee 


3,000 


600 20 






’ f'otlawatomie 


3800 


570 15 






’ Pratt 


4,100 


840 20 






Reno 


18.600 


7.110 38 


• 


• 


’Rice 


5..300 


1 480 28 






'Riley 


10,100 


1,040 10 






’Saline 


11,600 


1,630 14 






Sedgwick 


94800 


37,270 40 


35,310 


37% 



Shawnee 


39,000 


19.790 51 






’Stafford 


2.800 


560 20 






’Sumner 


8,600 


1,580 18 


• 


• 


’Wabaunsee 


2,200 


420 19 






’Washington 


4.200 


460 11 






’Wilson 


4.900 


760 16 






’Woodson 


2,200 


310 14 






Wyandotte 


55,400 


41,180 74 


• 


• 


TV eountiei 


567,500 


209,650 37% 


50,570 


9% 


other counties 


94.900 


2,950 3% 






total 


662,400 


212.600 32% 


50,570 


8% 


KENTUCKY 










TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


’Adair 


4,500 


1,640 36% 






’Allen 


4.000 


1.440 36 


• 


• 


’Anderson 


2,600 


1,170 45 






’Barren 


8.500 


2.760 32 






'Bath 


2.800 


310 11 






Bell 


11,400 


1.110 10 






’ Boone 


4.000 


2.560 64 






’Bourbon 


5,200 


2,210 43 






Boyd 


14.400 


9,690 67 






’Boyle 


5.700 


1.990 35 






’Bracken 


2.600 


1,090 42 






’ Breckinridge 


4,200 


2,020 48 






'Bullitt 


3.400 


2,520 74 


• 


• 


'Butler 


2,600 


650 25 


• 


• 


’Caldwell 


4.000 


720 18 


600 


15% 


’Calloway 


6,100 


1,810 30% 






Campbell 


23300 


21,130 89 






’Carroll 


2,600 


1,660 64 






’Carter 


5300 


2,540 48 






’Casey 


4,100 


1,520 37 






Christian 


11.500 


4,720 41 






'Clark 


5,600 


1,310 23 






’Clinton 


2.700 


490 18 






’Crittenden 


3300 


580 18 


480 


15% 


’Cumberland 


2,200 


400 18 






Daviess 


16,700 


8.330 50 


4,530 


27 


’Edmonson 


2,300 


620 27 






'Elliott 


1300 


620 48 






'Estill 


3.600 


830 23 






Fayette 


29.800 


6,370 21 






’Fleming 


3.500 


940 27 






F'loyd 


12.000 


5,650 47 






’Franklin 


7.900 


3.150 40 


• 


• 


’Gallatin 


1300 


770 64 






’Garrard 


3,100 


1,120 36 






’Gram 


3,000 


1,920 64 






’Grayson 


4,700 


1,290 27 






’Green 


3,300 


1,220 37 






’Greenup 


6,400 


3,000 47 






’Hancock 


1.500 


380 25 


• 


• 


’Hardin 


11,400 


5,420 48 






’Harlan 


16,800 


3,500 21 






’Harrison 


4,100 


1,720 42 






'Hart 


4.400 


1,190 27 






’Henderson 


10.100 


1,900 19 


1,560 


IS 


’Henry 


3,400 


1,390 41 


• 


• 


Hopkins 


11,600 


1,360 12 


• 


• 


Jefferson 


152,900 


123,510 81 


• 


• 


’Jessamine 


3,600 


1,300 36 






’Johnson 


5,800 


2,340 40 






Kenton 


33,900 


28,450 84 






’Knott 


4,100 


410 10 






’Larue 


2.700 


1,220 45 






’i.awrence 


3,500 


1,680 48 






’Lee 


1,800 


200 11 






’Leslie 


3,200 


320 10 






’Letcher 


9,000 


910 10 






’Lewis 


3,200 


830 26 






’Lincoln 


4,900 


1,760 36 






’Livingston 


2,300 


410 18 


350 


15 


’Logan 


6,400 


2,340 37 


• 


• 


’l.yon 


1.400 


410 29 






McCracken 


28,600 


4,940 17 






’McLean 


2,800 


700 25 


• 


• 


’Magoffin 


2,700 


1,110 41 






’Marion 


4,200 


1,860 44 






’Marshall 


4.200 


1.220 29 






’ Marlin 


2,500 


1,030 41 






’Mason 


5,400 


2.190 41 






’Meade 


2.800 


1,340 48 






’Menifee 


1,000 


110 11% 






’ Mercer 


4.500 


1,620 36 






’Metcalfe 


2,700 


860 32 






’Monroe 


3,600 


1.150 32 






’Montgomery 


3.800 


870 23 






’ Morgan 


3,200 


330 10 






’Muhlenberg 


8.500 


2,110 25 


* 


* 


’Nelson 


5,000 


3.690 74 


• 


* 


’Nicholas 


2,200 


920 42 






'Ohio 


5.600 


1,360 24 


• 





'Oldham 


2,700 


UlO 


41 


’Owen 


3,000 


1,920 


64 


’Pendleton 


3,000 


1.260 


42 


'Perry 


10,100 


1,040 


10 


Pike 


18,900 


8,280 


44 



’Powell 

’Robertson 

’Rowan 

’Russell 

’Scott 


1,400 

800 

3,100 

3,600 

4,500 


320 

340 

810 

650 

1,940 


23 

42 
26 
18 

43 






’Shelby 


5,100 


2.090 


41 


• 


• 


’Simpson 


3,500 


1360 


36 


• 


• 


’Spencer 


1,400 


1,040 


74 


• 


• 


’Taylor 


4.100 


1320 


37 






'Todd 


3,700 


1330 


36 


• 


• 


'Trigg 


2300 


670 


29 






’Trimble 


1,500 


620 


41 


• 




’Union 


4,100 


740 


18 


620 


15% 


Warren 


12.700 


4,140 


33 






’Washington 


3.300 


1,490 


45 






’Wayne 


4,000 


710 


18 






’Webster 


4.600 


830 


18 


690 


IS 


’Wolfe 


1,400 


150 


11 






’Woodford 


3.400 


1,460 


43 






TV eountie* 


747,300 


349,950 


47% 


23,500 


3% 


other counties 


82300 


4,160 


5% 






total 


830,100 


354,110 


43% 


23,500 


3% 


LOUISIANA 












TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Acadia 


12.900 


1,720 


13% 


• 


• 


’Allen 


5.400 


650 


12 






’Ascension 


6,100 


1.680 


28 


• 


• 


’Assumption 


4300 


1380 


32 






Avoyelles 


10,500 


1,410 


13 






’Beauregard 


5.300 


800 


15 






’Bienville 


4,700 


610 


13 


• 


• 


Calcasieu 


30,500 


4.700 


IS 


• 


• 


’Caldwell 


2,800 


390 


14 


• 


• 


’Cameron 


1300 


130 


11 


• 


• 


’Catahoula 


3.000 


420 


14 


• 


• 


’Claiborne 


6,500 


980 


15 






’Concordia 


4,000 


580 


15 


• 


• 


E. Baton Rouge 


54,700 


17350 


32% 


14.580 


27% 


’East Carroll 


4300 


1.390 


33 


• 


• 


’Evangeline 


9,000 


1,080 


12 






’Franklin 


7300 


1340 


18 






’Grant 


3,700 


520 


14 






Iberia 


11.100 


2,150 


19 






’Iberville 


7,300 


730 


10 






’Jackson 


3,900 


510 


13 


• 


• 


Jefferson 


39300 


30.510 


78 


• 


• 


’Jeff Davis 


7.400 


820 


11 


• 


• 


Lafourche 


10,800 


5,130 


48 






+La Salle 


3,800 


530 


14 


• 


• 


’Lincoln 


6.500 


840 


13 


• 


• 


’Livingston 


5.600 


1,570 


28 


• 


• 


’Madison 


4.700 


1,550 


33 


• 


• 


’Natchitoches 


9,700 


1,410 


15 






Orleans 


180,300 


120.490 


67 


• 


• 


Ouachita 


23.700 


6,680 


28 


4.770 


20 


’Plaquemines 


3.700 


2.410 


65 


• 


• 


Rapides 


27,300 


6.120 


22 






’Richland 


6,700 


2390 


34 


• 


• 


’St. Bernard 


3.400 


2310 


65 


• 


• 


’St. Charles 


3,600 


1,620 


45 






’St. James 


3,700 


1.690 


46 






'St. John 


3,600 


1.620 


45 






St. Landry 


19.800 


2,990 


15 


• 


• 


’St. Martin 


6.300 


630 


10 






’St. Mary 


10,100 


3350 


32 






’St. Tammany 


8.000 


5,220 


65 


• 


• 


Tangipahoa 


15.400 


9,680 


63 


• 


• 


’Tensas 


3.500 


670 


19 






Terrebonne 


11.400 


7.120 


62 






Vermilion 


10,400 


1350 


12 






’Vernon 


6.200 


910 


15 






Washington 


10.800 


8.860 


82 






’Webster 


10,100 


1,460 


14 






’W. Baton Rouge 


3.300 


330 


10 






’West Carroll 


4.000 


1.32a 


33 


• 


• 


’Winn 


4.600 


640 


14 






TV counties 


666,000 


272,340 


41% 


43,430 


7% 


other counties 


124.100 


6.430 


5% 


1,780 


1% 


total 


790,100 


278.770 


35% 


45.260 


6% 


MAINE 












TV counties total families 


TV families 


( 'HF families 


Androscoggin 


24.400 


3370 


13% 


• 


• 


Cumberland 


50.500 


15.490 


31 


11320 


23% 


Hancock 


10.000 


1,850 


19 






Kennebec 


23.500 


6.170 


26 






’Knox 


8.900 


2.550 


29 







6 



'^Lincoln 


5.500 


1,160 


21 


• 


• 


Penobscot 


28,800 


14,950 


52 






H'iscataquis 


5.400 


1,240 


23% 






^Sagadahoc 


6,400 


1,360 


21 


• 


• 


Somerset 


11,400 


2,600 


23 






IWaldo 


6,400 


1,860 


29 






York 


27,500 


14,080 


51 


• 


• 


TV counties 


208,700 


66,580 


32% 


14,520 


7% 


other counties 


51,300 


1,390 


3% 






total 


260.000 


67$70 


26% 


14,520 


6% 



MARYLAND 










TV counties total families 


TV families 


UHF famUies 


^Allegany 


27.200 


9,870 


36% 




Anne Arundel 


35.100 


28,950 


82 




Baltimore 


378,800 


329,670 


87 




■^Calvert 


3,300 


2,080 


63 




■^Caroline 


5,800 


4.060 


70 




'•‘Carroll 


12,300 


8,440 


69 




Cecil 


9.700 


7.180 


74 




^Charles 


6.100 


3,840 


63 




^Dorchester 


8.500 


5,430 


64 




Frederick 


18.700 


11330 


63 




^Garrett 


5,500 


1,980 


36 




Harford 


16,400 


14,380 


88 




^Howard 


6.800 


4,690 


69 




^Kent 


4,300 


3,010 


70 




Montgomery 


56,700 


52,060 


92 




Prince George 


66.700 


64.950 


97 




Annes 


4,500 


3,150 


70 




■•St. Marys 


8.300 


5330 


63 




^Somerset 


6,200 


1,300 


21 




^Talbot 


6,400 


4,460 


70 




Washington 


24,500 


15,680 


64 


• • 


Wicomico 


13,000 


4.740 


36 




■•Worcester 


7,800 


1,670 


21 




TV counties 


732,600 


588.650 


80% 


640 LT 


total 


732.600 


588,650 


80% 


640 LT 



mASSACHUSETTS 



TV counties total families TV families UHF families 



^Barnstable 


16,400 


9,880 


60% 






Berkshire 


41,000 


31,920 


78 






Bristol 


119,600 


95.560 


80 






^Dukcs 


1,800 


1,080 


60 






Essex 


164,600 


139,420 


85 






Franklin 


17,000 


6,760 


40 


3360 


19% 


Hampden 


114,000 


71320 


63 


25,180 


22 


Hampshire 


24300 


11,430 


47 


7.020 


29 


Middlesex 


313,600 


244,890 


78 


• 


• 


^Nantucket 


1,100 


660 


60 






Norfolk 


120,700 


95360 


79% 


• 


• 


Plymouth 


61.600 


49,590 


81 






Suffolk 


263.700 


219.610 


83 






Worcester 


164,900 


131,630 


80 






TV counties 


1,424,300 


1,109,610 


78% 


40,330 


3% 


total 


1.424,300 


1,109,610 


78% 


40J30 


3% 



MICHIGAN 




TV counties total families 


TV families UHF famUies 



^Allegan 


15300 


9380 


61% 






^Antrim 


3,500 


540 


15 


• 


• 


^Barry 


8,700 


5310 


61 






Bay 


27,400 


13360 


51 


7,670 


2B% 


^Benzie 


2,600 


290 


11 






Berrien 


39300 


31.750 


80 


4.960 


12 


•Branch 


9.600 


6340 


66 






Calhoun 


39300 


29,580 


75 






’C»»s 


9,900 


7320 


79 






^Clarc 


3300 


1320 


46 


660 


20 


•Clinton 


9,400 


6,020 


64 






•Crawford 


1300 


180 


14 






•Dickinson 


7,700 


1,650 


21 






F^ton 


13300 


7.050 


53 






Genesee 


86300 


48,980 


56 






•Gladwin 


2.600 


1300 


46 


520 


20 


•Grand Traverse 


8300 


940 


11 






•(Gratiot 


10,100 


6330 


65 






HilMale 


11300 


5,610 


48 






•Huron 


9.600 


2350 


24 






Ingham 


56300 


42300 


75 


13300 


25 


Ionia 


11300 


5310 


47 






•Isabella 


8300 


3,460 


42 






Jackson 


34.000 


24.9ort 


73 






Kalamazoo 


41,900 


31,080 


74 


• 


• 


«Kalka«ka 


uwo 


180 


14 


• 


• 


Kent 


95.100 


60360 


64 






•Irske 


1300 


200 


11 







Lapeer 


9,600 


5.350 


56 






•Leelanau 


2,600 


290 


11 






Lenawee 


21.000 


13380 


63 






Livingston 


8,800 


6,790 


77 


• 


• 


Macomb 


64.100 


58.340 


91 






•Manistee 


6,300 


630 


10 






•Mason 


6,600 


1,100 


17 






•Mecosta 


5,800 


2,440 


42 






•Menominee 


7,600 


1,670 


22 






tMidland 


11300 


5320 


47 


2,170 


20 


•Missaukee 


2,100 


300 


14 


• 


• 


Monroe 


24,000 


19,490 


81 


• 


• 


•Montcalm 


10300 


5,420 


53 






Muskegon 


40300 


24,580 


61 






•Newaygo 


6,900 


3,590 


52 






Oakland 


135,200 


125,060 


93% 






•Oceana 


5,100 


820 


16 






•Osceola 


4,100 


1,720 


42 






•Otsego 


1,700 


240 


14 


• 


• 


Ottawa 


23,900 


14,890 


62 






•Roscommon 


2.400 


340 


14 


• 


• 


Saginaw 


47,800 


27,750 


58 


15,820 


33% 


St. Clair 


29,800 


25.060 


84 






•St. Joseph 


11,900 


7,950 


67 






•Sanilac 


9,500 


2,380 


25 






Shiawassee 


14,800 


10,020 


68 






I'uscola 


11,300 


3,370 


30 


1,200 


11 


•Van Buren 


13,400 


10,570 


79 


• 


• 


Washtenaw 


40,300 


26.110 


65 


• 


• 


Wayne 


759,500 


653,690 


86 






•Wexford 


5,800 


640 


11 






TV counties 


1,913,900 


1,414,190 


74% 


58,940 


3% 


other counties 


109,600 


3,740 


3% 


180 


LT 


total 


2,023,500 


1,417,930 


70% 


59,120 


3% 



MINNESOTA 








TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


UHF families 


fAitkin 


4.100 


1,150 


2&% 




Anoka 


11,000 


8.650 


79 




•Becker 


6300 


720 


11 




•Benton 


4,100 


1,150 


28 




•Big Stone 


2.600 


340 


13 




Blue Earth 


11.400 


6,080 


53 




•Brown 


7.600 


2,170 


29 




•Carlton 


6,800 


1,190 


18 


• • 


•Carver 


5300 


2390 


44 




•Cass 


5,300 


690 


13 




•Chisago 


3.900 


2,540 


65 




tClay 


9,100 


4.070 


45 




•Cottonwood 


4,700 


1.500 


32 




•Crow Wii)g 


9,600 


1360 


13 




Dakota 


14.500 


11.300 


78 




•Dodge 


3,600 


1,080 


30 




•Douglas 


6.400 


900 


14 




•Faribault 


7,000 


1,190 


17 




•Fillmore 


7,300 


1,360 


19 




•Freeborn 


10,400 


3,390 


33 




•Goodhue 


9,800 


5,670 


58 




•Grant 


2,800 


360 


13 




Hennepin 


220.500 


182,700 


83 




•Houston 


4300 


760 


18 




•Hubbard 


3300 


360 


11 




•Isanti 


3300 


2,080 


65 




•Jackson 


4.700 


1,500 


32 




•Kanabec 


2,800 


790 


28 




•Kandiyohi 


8.100 


2,510 


31 




•Le Sueur 


5,800 


3.000 


52 




•Lincoln 


3.000 


570 


19% 




•Lyon 


6,600 


1300 


18 




tMcLeod 


6,600 


2,900 


44 




•Mahnomen 


1.400 


150 


11 




•Martin 


7,600 


1,370 


18 




^Meeker 


5,400 


1.670 


31 




•Mille Lacs 


4,400 


1390 


29 




•Morrison 


6,800 


680 


10 




•Mower 


12.600 


3,740 


30 




•Murray 


4,000 


760 


19 




•Nicollet 


5300 


1,480 


28 




•Nobles 


6,500 


2,090 


32 




•Norman 


3,600 


1,620 


45 




•Olmsted 


14300 


7330 


52 




Otter Tail 


13,900 


1,830 


13 




tPinc 


5,100 


870 


17 


• • 


• Pipestone 


3,900 


740 


19 




• Pope 


3,600 


500 


14 




Ramsey 


113,700 


88330 


78 




•Redwood 


6.400 


1,860 


29 




•Renville 


6300 


1.930 


28 




•Rice 


9.200 


5,340 


58 




•Rock 


3,400 


650 


19 




St. I^ouis 


66,300 


16.110 


24 


12,860 19%> 


•Scott 


4,500 


2,340 


52 




•.Sherburne 


2,800 


1,120 


40 





•Sibley 


4.400 


2390 


52 






•Stearns 


17,100 


6,910 


40 






•Steele 


6,500 


3,770 


58 






•Stevens 


3.000 


430 


14 






♦Swift 


4,600 


640 


14 






♦Todd 


6,900 


760 


11 






•Traverse 


2,300 


300 


13 






•Wabasha 


4.900 


2,550 


52 






•Wadena 


3,500 


350 


10 






•Waseca 


4,500 


1,490 


33 






•Washington 


10,700 


6.960 


65 






• Watonwan 


4.100 


700 


17 






♦Wilkin 


2,800 


360 


13 






Winona 


11,900 


1,500 


13 






•Wright 


8.000 


3,580 


45 






TV counties 


829,400 


433,710 


52% 


13,400 


2 % 


other counties 


70,600 


3,310 


5% 


120 


LT 


total 


900,000 


437.020 


49% 


13,520 


2% 



MISSISSIPPI 

TV counties total families 


TV families 


UHF famUUs 


•Adams 


9.700 


980 


10% 






•Alcorn 


7.800 


1,780 


23 






•Amite 


4,600 


780 


17 


* 


• 


•Attala 


6.600 


730 


11 


• 


• 


•Benton 


2.100 


670 


32 






Bolivar 


16.400 


2.860 


17% 






•Calhoun 


4.600 


640 


14 






•Carroll 


3.400 


410 


12 






•Chickasaw 


4,700 


560 


12 






•Choctaw 


2,800 


340 


12 






•Claiborne 


3.000 


780 


26 


600 


20% 


♦Clay 


4,400 


530 


12 






Coahoma 


14.500 


1,540 


11 






•Copiah 


7,900 


2.020 


26 


1,630 


20 


•Covington 


3.800 


610 


16 






•De Soto 


6.000 


1,980 


33 






•Forrest 


14.100 


4,210 


30 






•Franklin 


2.900 


290 


10 






•George 


2,700 


840 


31 






•Grenada 


5.000 


650 


13 






•Hancock 


3,300 


2,050 


62 






Harrison 


30,100 


9,880 


33 






Hinds 


43.100 


17,410 


40 


17.410 


40 


•Holmes 


8.100 


880 


11 


• 


• 


•Humphreys 


5,400 


1,260 


23 


930 


17 


•Issaquena 


1.100 


250 


23 


190 


17 


•Itawamba 


4,400 


700 


16 






•Jackson 


10.000 


3,100 


31 






•Jefferson 


2,900 


290 


10 






•Jeff Davis 


3,800 


530 


14 






•Jones 


16,800 


2,610 


16 






•Lafayette 


5,500 


850 


15 






•Lamar 


3.600 


1,080 


30 






Lauderdale 


19.700 


2,800 


14 


• 


• 


•Lawrence 


3,100 


430 


14 






•Leake 


5,200 


570 


11 


• 


• 


Lee 


11,000 


3.340 


30 






Leflore 


13,700 


2,980 


22 


• 


• 


•Lincoln 


7,700 


1,310 


17 


• 


• 


•Madison 


8,100 


1,050 


13 


1.050 


13 


•Marion 


6,400 


970 


IS 






•Marshall 


5,800 


1.860 


32 






•Monroe 


10.000 


UlO 


12 






•Montgomery 


3,800 


420 


11 






•Panola 


7,800 


4,030 


52 






•Pearl River 


5,800 


3,590 


62 






♦Pike 


9,600 


1.610 


17 


• 


• 


•Pontotoc 


5,200 


780 


15 






•Prentiss 


5.200 


790 


15 






•Quitman 


6.500 


1,170 


18 






•Rankin 


6.200 


830 


13 


830 


13 


•Scott 


5,500 


610 


11 


• 


• 


•Sharkey 


3.100 


710 


23 


530 


17 


•Simpson 


5,500 


720 


13 


720 


13 


•Smith 


3,900 


430 


11 


• 


• 


•Stone 


1,400 


420 


30 






•Tallahatchie 


7,600 


1,430 


19 






•Tate 


4,500 


2,300 


51 






•Tippah 


4,400 


1.010 


23 






•Tishomingo 


4.200 


670 


16 






•Tunica 


5,600 


2,860 


5\% 






•Union 


5,700 


1,310 


23 






•Walthall 


3,600 


500 


14 






Warren 


12,500 


3,160 


25 


2,110 


17% 


Washington 


21.100 


2,980 


14 






•Webster 


2,900 


350 


12 






•Wilkinson 


3,400 


340 


10 






•Yalobusha 


3,900 


550 


14 






•Yazoo 


8.900 


1,200 


13 


1.200 


13 


TV counties 


513.600 


115,380 


22 % 


31,980 


6 % 


other counties 


73,800 


3,990 


5 % 







total 587,400 119,370 20% 31,980 5% 



7 



MISSOURI 








TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


^Andrew 


4,000 


2330 567o 




■•^ Atchison 


3.500 


1.050 30 




^Audrain 


8.400 


1,880 22 




■♦^Barrv 


6,700 


1370 19 




’Barton 


4,400 


720 16 




■•^Baies 


6,200 


3390 53 




^Benton 


2.700 


570 21 




’Bollinger 


3.100 


840 27 




Boone 


14,200 


1,950 14 




Buchanan 


31,600 


19.620 62 




tCaldwell 


3,600 


2.010 56 


• • 


^Callaway 


6.500 


1,500 23 




■•^Camden 


2,500 


530 21 




Cape Girardeau 


12.000 


1350 10 




tCarroU 


5,100 


2,500 49 




’Carter 


1.300 


200 15 




’Cass 


6,700 


3,550 S3 




’Cedar 


3,800 


650 17 




’Chariton 


4,900 


1,180 24 




’Christian 


3,900 


900 23 




’Clark 


3.000 


750 25 




Clay 


18.400 


14.790 80 


1,880 10% 


’Clinton 


4.000 


2,230 56 


* * 


’Cole 


10.100 


2,080 21 




’Crawford 


3.600 


1310 34 




’Dade 


3,000 


510 17 




’Dallas 


3.300 


320 10 




’Daviess 


3,700 


2.060 56 


* * 


’De Kalb 


3.000 


1,680 56 


* * 


’Dent 


3,400 


1.160 34 




’Douglas 


3,600 


860 24 




Dunklin 


13,000 


3,850 30 




Franklin 


11,700 


4.340 37 




’Gasconade 


4.100 


1.150 28 




’Gentry 


3.600 


1,080 30 




Greene 


37.000 


13,480 36 




’Grundy 


4.500 


1,890 42 




’Harrison 


4,600 


1.370 30 




’Henry 


6.900 


3.660 53% 




’Hickory 


1.700 


360 21 




'Holt 


3.100 


930 30 




’Iron 


2.600 


880 34 




Jackson 


193.600 


132.120 68 


21,070 n% 


Jasf>er 


28.300 


4.430 16 




Jefferson 


12.500 


8300 66 




’Johnson 


6,900 


3,800 55 


• • 


’Knox 


2,700 


680 25 




’Laclede 


6.100 


1,330 22 


1 


’Lafayette 


8.200 


4.460 54 


* 


’Lawrence 


8.000 


1,550 19 




’Lewis 


3.600 


890 25 




’Lincoln 


4.700 


2,020 43 




’Linn 


6.600 


1,150 17 




’Livingston 


5,500 


2.310 42 




’McDonald 


4..300 


650 15 




’Macon 


6.400 


1.090 17 




’Madison 


3.200 


860 27 




’Maries 


2,100 


590 .28 




’Marion 


10,300 


3.420 33 




’Mercer 


2,500 


750 30 




’Miller 


4300 


900 21 




’Monroe 


3,900 


820 21 




’Montgomery 


4.000 


1,720 43 




’Morgan 


3.200 


630 20 




’New Madrid 


10.300 


2,130 21 




’Newton 


9.100 


1,310 14 




’Nodaway 


7,800 


2300 29 




’Oregon 


3300 


530 15 




’Osage 


3,100 


870 28 




’Ozark 


2.400 


580 24 




Pemiscot 


12.600 


5,520 44 




’ Perry 


4,300 


1,150 27 




Pettis 


11,100 


4.240 38 




’Phelps 


8300 


2.260 28 




'Pike 


6.000 


2,540 42 




'Platte 


4.900 


2.700 55 


• • 


'Polk 


5300 


500 10 




'Piilavki 


3.400 


710 21 




'Rail, 


2,700 


920 34 




’ Randolph 


8300 


1.730 21 




'Ray 


5300 


2,740 50 




’Reynolds 


1,500 


Z30 IS 




'Ri,,b-y 


3300 


550 16 




St. fdurles 


9.400 


5.740 61 


* * 


’Si. Clatr 


3,500 


880 25 




’St. Francois 


10,700 


6,680 62 




St. UHli, 


419.400 


327.410 78 


40.050 10 


’Sie. (/enevievc 


3300 


1.980 62 




’Saline 


8300 


2.100 25 




•S<-olland 


2300 


630 25 




’Shannon 


2300 


330 15 




'Sli.'ll.y 


3.700 


1.260 34 




’^SlfMldard 


9,700 


1,940 20 




’Slone 




700 247o 



■^Taney 



3,100 



’Vernon 


7.000 


1.710 


24 






’^^’arren 


2.600 


U20 


43 






’X^’ashington 


4,100 


1,340 


33 






’Webster 


4.600 


450 


10 






’Worth 


1.400 


420 


30 






’Wright 


5.000 


1,050 


21 






TV counties 


1,234,800 


672.690 


54% 


64,990 


5% 


other counties 


71.500 


4.470 


7% 






total 


urnjioo 


677.160 


527c 


64^0 


5% 



Rockingham 

Strafford 

^Sullivan 

Ty counties 
other counties 



MONTANA 



TV counties total families 



TV families VHF families 



Silver Bow 
TV counties 
other counties 



NEBRASKA 



18.300 

18,300 

179,400 

197,700 



6,080 33% 

6,080 33% 
3,020 2% 

9,100 5% 



+Thurslon 
^Washington 
t Wayne 
tYork 

TV counties 
other counties 



2,500 

3.700 
3,000 

4.700 

321,600 

105,700 



NEVADA 

TV counties total families 



980 39 

2,850 77 

1.170 39 

1,630 35 

175,330 55% 

2,080 2% 

177,410 42% 



TV families VHF families 



22300 


17370 


78 


15300 


7.760 


51 


8.100 


4.0S0 


so 


18.000 


83,070 


60% 


24,600 


1320 


7% 



162,600 



NEW JERSEY 



TV counties total families 



84A90 52% 



TV families VHF families 



TV counties 


total families 


TV families VHF families \ 


’Adams 


9,400 


1,600 


17% 


’Antelope 


3,700 


810 


22 


’Boone 


3,300 


420 


13 


’Buffalo 


8.500 


1,060 


12 


’Burt 


3,600 


2,770 


77 


'Butler 


3,800 


1,360 


36 


’Cass 


5.400 


4.000 


74 


’Cedar 


3,900 


860 


22 


’Colfax 


3.400 


1.600 


47 


’Cuming 


3.900 


1,840 


47 


’Dakota 


3300 


1350 


39 


’Dawson 


6,600 


860 


13 


’Dixon 


2.900 


1,130 


39 j 


’Dodge 


9.500 


7360 


76 


Douglas 


92,500 


78300 


85 


’Fillmore 


3.200 


640 


20 


’Gage 


8,900 


3.960 


44 


’Greeley 


1.400 


200 


14 


'Hall 


10.900 


1,940 


18 


’Hamilton 


3,000 


1,080 


36 


’Howard 


2,300 


320 


14 


’Jefferson 


4,400 


880 


20 


’Johnson 


2.400 


1,080 


45 


’Knox 


4,500 


1,040 


23 


Lancaster 


40,800 


25.140 


62 


’Madison 


7,700 


3.050 


40 


’Merrick 


3,000 


410 


14 


’Nance 


1.800 


250 


14 


’Nemaha 


3.400 


1320 


36% 


’Otoe 


5,500 


4,090 


74 


’Pawnee 


2300 


790 


36 


’Pierce 


3.000 


660 


22 


’Platte 


6,100 


2,380 


39 


tPolk 


2,500 


900 


36 


’Richardson 


5,600 


1.990 


36 


’Saline 


4,900 


1.030 


21 


’Sarpy 


4.900 


3,820 


78 


’Saunders 


5,600 


4.420 


79 


’Seward 


4300 


1,500 


36 


’Stanton 


1,900 


890 


47 



Clark 

Washoe 

TV counties 
other counties 



22,800 


6,110 


21% 


19,700 


5,460 


28 


42.500 


11,570 


27% 


18.100 


360 


2% 


60,600 


I1S30 


20% 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

TV counties total families 

■•Belknap 8.400 

^Carroll 5,000 

^Cheshire 11.600 

Hillsboro 48,800 

Merrimack 18,300 



TV families VHF families 



3.210 38% 

1,900 38 

5,720 49 

31,960 65 

10,900 60 



Atlantic 


44300 


31,930 


72% 


5,190 


12% 


Bergen 


190.900 


172350 


91 






Burlington 


39300 


34340 


88 






Camden 


96,500 


80,790 


84% 






Cape May 


13,600 


11370 


84 


1.750 


13% 


Cumberland 


29300 


25310 


86 






Essex 


285,600 


242340 


85 






Gloucester 


30,700 


27.000 


88 






Hudson 


202,700 


192350 


95 






Hunterdon 


14300 


12360 


87 






Mercer 


68,000 


60340 


89 






Middlesex 


84.000 


71,160 


85 






Monmouth 


77300 


72360 


94 






Morris 


52300 


42360 


81 






Ocean 


21,900 


17340 


80 






Passaic 


111,700 


97300 


88 






Salem 


16300 


14,950 


92 






Somerset 


31300 


26.530 


85 






Sussex 


11300 


8300 


73 






Union 


129300 


119,420 


92 






Warren 


17.600 


12390 


70 


• 


• 


TV counties 


1,568.100 


1,374,790 


88% 


7.850 


1 % 


total 


7368,7 00 


1,374.790 


88% 


7350 


1% 


NEW MEXICO 










TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Bernalillo 


50300 


22,930 


45% 






’Chaves 


13.900 


4370 


31 






'Curry 


8.000 


1.010 


13 






’De Baca 


1,000 


310 


31 






’Dona Ana 


1U300 


2390 


21 






Eddy 


14,400 


3.480 


24 






’Guadalupe 


1,400 


430 


31 






’Lincoln 


1,700 


270 


16 






’Los Alamos 


3,600 


680 


19 






’Luna 


2300 


590 


21 






’Otero 


4.400 


680 


15 






’Quay 


4300 


560 


13 






Sandoval 


2,500 


540 


22 






’Santa Fe 


10.700 


2,100 


20 






’Torrance 


1,700 


320 


19 






Valencia 


5.400 


2.090 


39 






TV counties 


137,400 


42,550 


31% 






other counties 


64.600 


1320 


2% 






total 


202Sm 


43,770 


22% 






NEW YORK 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Albany 


79,600 


59350 


75% 


* 


• 


Allegany 


13300 


7330 


58 






Bronx 


458,400 


360,970 


79 






Brnome 


58,300 


42360 


74% 






Cattaraugus 


24300 


16350 


70 






Cayuga 


21,600 


17,690 


82 






Chautauqua 


46,300 


29,000 


63 






Chemung 


28.800 


12.080 


42 


6.040 


21% 


Chenango 


12300 


7350 


60 






Clinton 


13,900 


4,690 


34 






Columbia 


14.000 


10300 


77 






Cortland 


11.700 


7350 


63 






Delaware 


13,900 


5,460 


39 






Dutchess 


38,400 


23.960 


62 






Erie 


281,600 


243390 


87 


39370 


14 


Essex 


10,400 


2310 


27 






Franklin 


12300 


1.910 


15 






Fulton 


17300 


10,770 


62 






Genesee 


14.600 


10380 


71 






’Greene 


9300 


5.490 


60 






Hamilton 


1300 


770 


59 






Herkimer 


19.500 


14.110 


72 






Jefferson 


26.900 


10.930 


41 






Kings 


851,900 


735350 


86 






Lewis 


6.600 


3,730 


57 






Livingston 


11.300 


6.S30 


58 






Madison 


14.400 


8380 


62 






Monroe 


160,400 


131.030 


82 






Montgomery 


19300 


11.660 


61 






Nassau 


261300 


233.160 


89 







8 



New York 
Niagara 
Oneida 
Onondaga 
^Ontario 


672.700 
60,500 
68.900 

109.700 
18.100 


401,750 

50.810 

64,920 

98380 

12,570 


60 

84 

94 

90 

69 


9,620 


16 


Orange 


47,100 


41,100 


87 






Orleans 


9,600 


7.940 


83 


• 


• 


Oswego 


23,800 


17,450 


73 






Otsego 


16.600 


10.820 


65 






Putnam 


6,700 


4,010 


60 






Queens 


521.900 


460,000 


88 






Rensselaer 


41,900 


34390 


82 


• 


• 


Richmond 


56,400 


50.620 


90 






Rockland 


24,500 


21,420 


87 






St. Lawrence 


27,700 


4300 


15 






Saratoga 


24,000 


16,710 


70 






Schenectady 


48.600 


36,640 


75 






Schoharie 


7,200 


4,320 


60 






tSchuyler 


4,600 


3,450 


75 






■^Seneca 


8.100 


6,120 


76 






Steuben 


28300 


11.790 


42 


4370 


15 


Suffolk 


92.000 


75330 


82 






Sullivan 


13,300 


8350 


67 


• 


• 


Tioga 


9300 


6,120 


62 


1,180 


12 


Tompkins 


17,900 


12,420 


69 






Ulster 


30.300 


15,920 


53 


• 


• 


Warren 


12,700 


9,960 


78 






W'ashington 


14,000 


9,350 


67 






W'ayne 


18.400 


14.440 


78% 






Westchester 


195,600 


153,610 


79 






Wyoming 


9.700 


5,810 


60 






Yates 


5300 


4,060 


70 






TV counties 


4,800,100 


3,712,620 


77% 


69,950 


1% 


total 


4,800,100 


3,712.620 


77% 


69^50 


1% 



NORTH CAROLINA 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


(JHF families 


Alamance 


20.000 


12.090 


60% 






■^Alexander 


3,600 


1,690 


47 






^Alleghany 


2,100 


970 


46 






^Anson 


6300 


3380 


52 






+Ashe 


5300 


2,390 


46 






7Avery 


3300 


860 


27 






^Beaufort 


9300 


3300 


41 






^Bertie 


6,100 


2360 


37 






Buncombe 


34300 


11330 


33 


4.040 


12% 


Burke 


11,400 


7,980 


70 






Cabarrus 


17,400 


11310 


64 


• 


• 


'Caldwell 


11,100 


5380 


48 






^Camden 


1.400 


760 


54 


• 


• 


^Caswell 


4300 


2,070 


46 


• 


• 


Catawba 


17,400 


10,030 


58 






'^Chatham 


6300 


2,900 


46 


• 


• 


^Cherokee 


4,400 


470 


11 






■^Chowan 


3,000 


810 


27 






'Clay 


1300 


130 


10 






^Cleveland 


16.400 


9370 


58 






Craven 


23.100 


3.550 


27 






Cumberland 


23,900 


2.970 


12 






■^Currituck 


1300 


970 


54 


• 


• 


^Dare 


1300 


350 


27 






Davidson 


17.400 


9,490 


55 


• 


• 


^Davie 


4,000 


2300 


55 


• 


• 


Durham 


28,400 


14380 


52 


• 


• 


Edgecombe 


12,000 


2,040. 


17 






Forsyth 


43,500 


23370 


54 


• 


• 


^Franklin 


7300 


1330 


21 






Gaston 


30.900 


21.420 


69 


• 


• 


^Gates 


2300 


1340 


54 


• 




^Graham 


1.700 


170 


10 






^Granville 


7,000 


2310 


40 


• 


• 


Guilford 


55,000 


24,410 


44 






Halifax 


13300 


1,630 


12 






Harnett 


11,700 


1300 


11 






^Haywood 


10.000 


1,680 


17 






^Henderson 


9300 


2,070 


23 


• 


• 


^Hertford 


4,900 


2350 


54 


• 


• 


'Hoke 


3,400 


780 


23 






'Hyde 


1300 


350 


27 






Iredell 


15300 


6330 


43 






^Jackson 


4300 


990 


22% 


• 


• 


'Lee 


6,100 


1,770 


29 


• 


• 


^Lincoln 


7,000 


4.060 


58 






^McDowell 


6,700 


4320 


63 






^Nfacon 


4.000 


400 


10 






^Madison 


4,600 


780 


17 






^Marlin 


6300 


2340 


41 






Merklenberg 


58300 


35,080 


60 






^Mitchell 


3.600 


970 


27 






^Montgomery 


4.400 


2390 


52 


• 


• 


^Moore 


8,600 


2340 


30 


• 


• 


Na,h 


14300 


2,190 


IS 






^Northampton 


6300 


2300 


37 






^Orange 


8,600 


3.950 


46 


• 


• 



■^Pasquotank 


6,800 


3,700 


54 


• 


* 


■^Perquimans 


2,500 


1,350 


54 


• 


• 


Person 


5,500 


2.200 


40 


• 


• 


Pitt 


14,900 


4,600 


31 






'Polk 


3300 


2,020 


63 






Randolph 


14,100 


6.080 


43 


• 


• 


■f Richmond 


10,300 


5310 


52 


• 


• 


Robeson 


20300 


3,400 


17 






■^Rockingham 


17,600 


7,690 


44 






^Rowan 


21300 


11.580 


55 


• 


• 


■^Rutherford 


11,900 


7,520 


63 






^Scotland 


6.300 


1.420 


23 






Stanly 


10.700 


8,380 


78 






Stokes 


5,100 


2340 


44 






♦Surry 


11,900 


5,380 


45 






■tSwain 


2,300 


230 


10 






^Transylvania 


3,900 


860 


22 


• 


• 


■^Tyrrell 


1300 


320 


27 






■t^Union 


10,600 


5.470 


52 






■•^Vance 


8,000 


1,660 


21 






Wake 


36.000 


11.420 


32 


7350 


20% 


^W'arren 


5.100 


1,070 


21 






^Washington 


3,100 


860 


28 






■^Watauga 


4,300 


1,140 


27 






Wayne 


15,800 


1,970 


12 






Wilkes 


11,100 


4,200 


38 






■•^Yadkin 


5,700 


3,140 


55 


• 


• 


^Yancey 


3,700 


630 


17 






TV counties 


920,100 


388,390 


42% 


24,980 


3% 


other counties 


136,300 


7,570 


6% 


910 


1% 


total 


1,056,400 


395^60 


37% 


25,890 


2% 



NORTH DAKOTA 






TV counties 


total families 


TV families UHF families 


■^Barnes 


4,500 


1,140 


2S% 


^Bottineau 


3300 


420 


13 


'Burke 


1,700 


220 


13 


Cass 


17.400 


5,500 


32 


'Griggs 


1300 


300 


25 


^McHenry 


3300 


420 


13% 


■^Ransom 


2.300 


230 


10 


Renville 


1,500 


200 


13 


^Richland 


5.300 


550 


10 


^Sargent 


1,700 


170 


10 


■•■Steele 


1,100 


280 


25 


'Traill 


3.000 


750 


25 


7Ward 


10,200 


1340 


12 


TV counties 


56,300 


11,420 


20% 


other counties 


104.900 


1,900 


2% 


total 


161,200 


13,320 


8% 



OHIO 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


JJHF families 


^Adams 


6,400 


3,840 


60% 






Allen 


28,500 


11,750 


41 


6,460 


23% 


Ashland 


10,700 


7370 


68 






Ashtabula 


25300 


19,990 


79 


4,830 


19 


^Athens 


12300 


5,670 


46 






^Auglaize 


9,800 


6310 


64 


• 


• 


Belmont 


26.000 


12,840 


49 






^Brown 


7,000 


4300 


60 






Butler 


46,000 


40390 


88 






■•Carroll 


5,700 


3,710 


65 


• 


• 


Champaign 


8,500 


5,970 


70 






Clark 


35,900 


28,570 


80 


• 


• 


Clermont 


13300 


9,710 


74 






Clinton 


8,400 


4,760 


57 






Columbiana 


31,000 


19,710 


64 


• 


• 


Coshocton 


10,000 


2380 


23 


• 


• 


Crawford 


12,600 


7,040 


56 






Cuyahoga 


439,000 


399,190 


91 






'Darke 


13300 


10,630 


81 






^Defiance 


8300 


5,190 


63 


• 


• 


■•Delaware 


8,900 


6,070 


68 






Eric 


17300 


12,540 


73 






Fairfield 


16,400 


11,410 


70 






• Fayette 


7,300 


4.390 


60 






Franklin 


162,600 


138,640 


85 






"•Fulton 


8,000 


5,760 


72 






Gallia 


6,700 


3,190 


48 






•Geauga 


8,100 


6.640 


82 


• 


• 


Greene 


19,500 


12,470 


64 






•Guernsey 


11,600 


4,080 


35 


• 


• 


Hamilton 


243300 


209,060 


86 






•Hancock 


15,000 


10,400 


69 






•Hardin 


9,000 


5,760 


64 






•Harrison 


5,700 


2.000 


35 


• 


• 


•Henry 


6.900 


4380 


62 


• 


• 



'Highland 9.400 5.670 60 

'Hocking 5.600 3«0 69 



•Holmes 


5,200 


2,810 


54% 


• 


• 


Huron 


12,500 


7,860 


63 






•Jackson 


8.300 


4.860 


59 






Jefferson 


27,700 


19,480 


70 


. 


. 


Knox 


11,200 


6320 


61 






Lake 


26300 


21,930 


84 


• 


• 


Lawrence 


14300 


9,910 


70 






Licking 


23,300 


19,130 


82 


• 


• 


•Logan 


10300 


6,540 


64 






•Logan 


47.100 


40,440 


86 






Lucas 


126,800 


107,100 


84 






•Madison 


6300 


3,720 


60 






Mahoning 


74,800 


43,190 


58 


19380 


26% 


•Marion 


16.600 


11,710 


71 






Medina 


13,300 


11,070 


83 






•Meigs 


7,000 


3320 


46 






•Mercer 


8.400 


2,440 


29 






Miami 


20,400 


17.990 


88 


• 


• 


•Monroe 


4,300 


1,460 


34 






Montgomery 


130,300 


119,110 


91 


• 


• 


•Morgan 


4,000 


1,400 


35 






•Morrow 


5.200 


3,690 


71 






Muskingum 


23.400 


10,190 


44 


6,390 


27 


'Noble 


3.400 


1,190 


35 






•Ottawa 


9,500 


5,990 


63 






•Paulding 


4,700 


1,360 


29 






• Perry 


8,500 


5,900 


69 






•Pickaway 


7,800 


5,620 


72 






'Pike 


5,600 


3,300 


59 






•Portage 


19,500 


15,900 


82 


• 


• 


•Preble 


8.500 


6,800 


80 






•Putnam 


7,200 


4,460 


62 


• 


• 


Richland 


29,300 


20,000 


68 






•Ross 


16,000 


11,440 


72 






•Sandusky 


14.700 


9,340 


64 






Scioto 


26,700 


19,010 


71 






Seneca 


16,200 


11,710 


72 






•Shelby 


8.600 


5.500 


64 


• 


• 


Stark 


89,300 


72360 


81 


• 


. 


Summit 


131,900 


117,180 


89 


13,640 


10 


Trumbull 


48,900 


38,150 


78 


11,690 


24 


•Tuscarawas 


22,000 


14,360 


65 


• 


• 


•Union 


6,400 


4.420 


69 






•Van Wert 


8,900 


2,660 


30 






•Vinton 


2,800 


1,930 


69 






Warren 


12.100 


8,120 


67 






Washington 


13,700 


3,730 


27 


• 


• 


•W'ayne 


17,500 


9,430 


54 


• 


• 


•Williams 


8,600 


6370 


73 






Wood 


17,900 


15,710 


88 






•W'yandol 


6.200 


4,340 


70 






TV counties 


2,517,800 


1,957,490 


78% 


85,380 


3% 


total 


2,517,800 


1,957,490 


78% 


85M0 


.3% 



OKLAHOMA 

TV counties total families 


T V families 


VHF families 


•Adair 




4,000 


640 


16% 




'Alfalfa 




3,300 


910 


28 




•Atoka 




3,500 


460 


13 




•Beckliam 




7.200 


890 


12 




•Blaine 




4,400 


2.160 


49 




•Bryan 




8,000 


1,070 


13 




Caddo 




10,200 


4,500 


44 




•Canadian 




7,700 


3,700 


48 




•Carter 




12,300 


2,080 


17 




•Cherokee 




4,900 


780 


16 




•Choctaw 




5.200 


620 


12 




Cleveland 




11,400 


6,530 


57 


1,380 12%> 


•Coal 




1,700 


220 


13 




Comanche 




17,800 


10,350 


58 




•Cotton 




2.900 


870 


30 




•Craig 




4.800 


2,730 


57 




Creek 




12,700 


6,640 


52 




•Custer 




6,500 


1,840 


28 




•Delaware 




4,100 


1,310 


32 




•Dewey 




2,500 


700 


28 




'Ellis 




2,300 


320 


14 




•Garfield 




17,600 


8.710 


49 




•Garvin 




8,800 


3,650 


41 




Grady 




10,600 


4,920 


46 




•Grant 




3.100 


870 


28 




•Greer 




3,400 


370 


11 




•Harmon 




2,300 


250 


11 




•Harper 




1,800 


250 


14 




'Hughes 




5.600 


1,180 


21 




•Jackson 




6,300 


690 


11 




•Jefferson 




3,100 


930 


30 




■•Johnston 




2,800 


360 


13 




Kay 




16,400 


6,410 


39 




•Kingfisher 




4,000 


1.960 


49 




•Kiowa 




5,700 


1,980 


35 




•Lincoln 




6.500 


2,340 


36 





9 



M.ogan 
^ Love* 

’ N!c('lain 
’McCurtain 


6.800 

1.700 

4.100 

8.100 


2,430 

290 

1.720 

930 


36 

17 

42 

11 






^NUIniosh 


4.300 


900 


21 






^ Major 


3,200 


900 


28 






*Mdr>hall 


2.300 


300 


13 






^ Mayes 


5.600 


3.180 


57 






♦Murray 


3.300 


1,550 


47 






♦Muskogee 


20,000 


8,890 


44 






♦Noble 


3.800 


1,860 


49 






♦Nowata 


3,900 


2.210 


57 






♦Okfuskee 


4,300 


1.460 


34 






Oklahoma 


116,500 


79.440 


68 


* 


• 


♦Okmulgee 


13,300 


4,570 


34 






♦Osage 


10.000 


5.200 


52 






♦Ottawa 


10,000 


3.190 


32% 






♦Pawnee 


4.100 


2.130 


52 






Payne 


14.000 


5,710 


41 






Pittsburg 


11.600 


2,750 


24 






♦Pontotoc 


8.900 


4,180 


47 






Pottawatomie 


13,200 


3,630 


28 






♦Pushmataha 


3,200 


380 


12 






♦Roger Mills 


2.100 


590 


28 






♦Rogers 


5,800 


3.240 


56 






Seminole 


10,700 


3.910 


37 






♦Sequoyah 


5.000 


830 


17 






Stephens 


11,500 


3.900 


34 






♦Tillman 


5.000 


1,480 


30 






Tulsa 


88,100 


65,670 


75 






♦Wagoner 


4.300 


1,890 


44 






Washington 


11,000 


5.050 


46 






♦Washita 


4.900 


1,720 


35 






♦Woods 


4,700 


720 


15 






♦Woodward 


4,100 


570 


14 






TV counties 


668,800 


311,560 


47% 


4,690 


1% 


other counties 


23,500 


480 


2% 


480 


2% 


total 


692^00 


312,040 


43% 


5.170 


1% 



OREGON 



TV counties total families 


TV families 


L HF families 


Clackamas 


30,600 


8.400 


21% 


8.400 


27% 


♦Clatsop 


11.600 


1,590 


14 


• 


• 


♦Columbia 


7,500 


1.050 


14 


• 


• 


Jackson 


22.500 


5.470 


24 






Marion 


32,900 


12.670 


39 


12,120 


37 


Multnomah 


175,300 


83.330 


48 


79.790 


46 


♦Tillamook 


6.600 


U20 


17 


730 


11 


Washington 


22.600 


9.650 


43 


8,850 


39 


♦Yamhill 


11,200 


1,910 


17 


1,140 


11 


TV counties 


320.800 


123,190 


39% 


111.480 


35% 


other counties 


225.700 


7,130 


3% 


3,690 


2% 


total 


546,500 


132^20 


24% 


115,170 


21% 



PENNSYLVANIA 



TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF far 


nilies 


Adams 


12,800 


5,610 


447e 


410 


• 


.Mlegheny 


449.600 


391.600 


87 


49,890 


11% 


Armstrong 


23.200 


16,060 


69 






Beaver 


51.200 


43,050 


84 


• 


* 


Bedford 


11,300 


8.540 


76 






Berks 


77,500 


57.580 


74 


9,260 


12 


Blair 


41,100 


26.650 


65 






Bradford 


15,500 


8360 


S3 


• 


• 


Bucks 


48.500 


43,520 


907o 






Butler 


28,500 


21,530 


76 






Cambria 


56.100 


42,660 


76 


• 


• 


♦Cameron 


1.900 


720 


38 


• 


• 


♦Carbon 


16,100 


9,930 


62 


• 


• 


Centre 


17,100 


10,040 


59 






Chester 


44.200 


42390 


96 






Clarion 


10,700 


7,050 


66 






Clearfield 


23.900 


14330 


60 






♦Clinton 


10,700 


4,110 


38 


• 


* 


♦Columbia 


16.200 


4.850 


30 


3350 


24% 


Crawford 


24,200 


6,660 


28 






Cumberland 


29.900 


11390 


38 


6.580 


22 


Dauphin 


61300 


33310 


54 


23,030 


38 


Delaware 


130,100 


112,680 


87 






*Elk 


9,600 


2,000 


21 






Erie 


68,100 


62,490 


92 






F'ayette 


52,100 


39340 


76 






♦Forest 


1300 


250 


21 






Franklin 


22.400 


11300 


50 


2,540 


11 


♦Fulton 


2,900 


1,130 


39 






Greene 


12.500 


5.340 


43 






♦Huntingdon 


11,400 


4.460 


39 






Indiana 


21300 


10,010 


47 






Jefferson 


14300 


8.180 


58 






♦Juniata 


4,400 


700 


16 


• 


• 


l,ackawanna 


72300 


49360 


69 


40320 


57 



Lancaster 


69,800 


50.090 


72 


• 


• 


Lawrence 


31,300 


20,490 


65 


4,740 


15 


Lebanon 


26,300 


17,6.30 


67 


6,090 


23 


Lehigh 


59,400 


47,940 


81 


• 


• 


Luzerne 


107,400 


53,550 


50 


45,100 


42 


Lycoming 


31,600 


5,630 


18 






McKean 


17.200 


8,190 


48 






Mercer 


33,000 


18,310 


55 


5.650 


17 


Mifflin 


12.700 


5,110 


40 






♦ Monroe 


10.400 


6,450 


62 


• 


• 


Montgomery 


104.600 


92,040 


88 






♦Montour 


3,700 


1,110 


30 


890 


24 


Northampton 


54,400 


38,430 


71 


• 


• 


Northumberland 33,700 


8,050 


24 


3.840 


11 


♦Perry 


7.300 


1.200 


16 


• 


• 


Philadelphia 


627.100 


543.100 


87 






iPike 


3,100 


960 


31 


• 


• 


♦Potter 


4,900 


1,720 


35 






Schuylkill 


56,200 


37.000 


66 


13,640 


24 


♦Snyder 


6.400 


830 


13 


• 


• 


• Somerset 


22.500 


11,630 


52 






♦Sullivan 


1.600 


480 


30 


380 


24 


♦Susquehanna 


9,000 


5,190 


58 


1,450 


16 


♦Tioga 


10.700 


3,740 


35 






♦Union 


6.000 


780 


13 


• 


• 


Venango 


18,800 


7,740 


41 






Warren 


12300 


4,240 


35 






Washington 


60.300 


48.090 


80 


• 


• 


♦ Wayne 


8.100 


2,550 


31% 


• 


• 


Westmoreland 


90,000 


69.110 


77 


• 


• 


♦Wyoming 


4.900 


2,790 


57 


780 


16% 


York 


63.800 


45,390 


71 


14,180 


22 


TV counties 


3,102,200 


2,276.640 


73% 257,860 


8% 


total 


3,102^00 


2,276,640 


73% 


257,860 


8% 



RHODE ISLAND 








TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Bristol 


8.700 


8,540 


98% 




Kent 


25.900 


21,350 


82 




Newport 


17.300 


13,910 


80 




Providence 


177,300 


164,030 


93 




Washington 


14,600 


9.890 


68 




TV counties 


243,800 


217,720 


89% 




total 


243,800 


217,720 


89% 




SOUTH CAROLINA 








TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 



♦Abbeville 


5,700 


1,430 


25% 


• 


• 


Aiken 


19,200 


2,350 


12 






Anderson 


24,200 


4.800 


20 


3,720 


157o 


♦Beaufort 


6,600 


1,210 


18 






♦Berkeley 


6,900 


2,550 


37 


• 


• 


♦Calhoun 


3,400 


650 


19 


370 


11 


Charleston 


47.600 


24,760 


52 






♦Cherokee 


8.700 


5.690 


65 






♦Chester 


8,200 


4.670 


57 






♦Chesterheld 


8,300 


2.880 


35 






♦Clarendon 


6,700 


1.010 


15 






♦Colleton 


7.300 


1,790 


25 






Darlington 


12,300 


3310 


27 






♦Dillon 


6,800 


1,700 


25 






♦Dorchester 


5,700 


1.370 


24 






♦Edgefield 


3.800 


1,220 


32 






♦Fairfield 


4.900 


2.790 


57 






Florence 


20,100 


9.560 


48 






♦Georgetown 


7,800 


2,890 


37 






Greenville 


49.200 


19,880 


40 


12,330 


25 


♦Greenwood 


11.200 


2,840 


25 






♦Hampton 


4.500 


860 


19 






♦Jasper 


2.700 


510 


19 






♦Kershaw 


7,700 


3.480 


45 






♦ Lancaster 


9.200 


5,150 


56. 






Laurens 


11.800 


3.360 


28 






♦Lee 


4,800 


2310 


46 






Lexington 


12,200 


4,760 


39 


3,000 


25 


♦McCormick 


2,100 


530 


25 






♦Marion 


7,900 


2,000 


25 






♦ Marlboro 


7.500 


2,630 


35% 






♦Newberry 


8.500 


2,760 


32 






♦Oconee 


9.600 


1,540 


16 


1,340 


14% 


♦Orangeburg 


16.400 


3,080 


19 


1.850 


11 


♦Pickens 


10,400 


1,680 


16 


1,450 


14 


Richland 


41,700 


14,370 


34 


11,500 


28 


♦Saluda 


3.800 


1320 


32 


• 


• 


Spartanburg 


40,600 


22.550 


56 


• 


• 


.Sumter 


14..300 


3370 


24 


• 


• 


♦Union 


7.700 


5,080 


66 






♦ Williamsburg 


9,300 


1320 


14 


• 


• 


York 


18,600 


10,620 


57 






TV counties 


525,900 


192,430 


37% 


44,780 


9% 


other counties 


28,700 


1.980 


7% 






total 


554,600 


194,410 


35% 


44.780 


8% 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



Ty counties total families TV families VHF families 



♦Bon Homme 


2300 


500 


18% 




♦Brookings 


5300 


760 


15 




♦Clay 


3300 


1,420 


43 




♦Hutchinson 


3300 


590 


18 




♦Kingsbury 


2,900 


460 


16 




♦Lake 


3300 


530 


16 




♦Lincoln 


3300 


1.640 


43 




Minnehaha 


23,100 


4370 


18 




♦Moody 


2,600 


420 


16 




♦Turner 


3.700 


1.590 


43 




♦Union 


3300 


1.420 


43 




♦Yankton 


4300 


810 


19 




TV counties 


61.600 


14,410 


23% 




other counties 


127.400 


3,480 


3% 




total 


189,000 


I7JB90 


9% 





TENNESSEE 

TV counties total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


Anderson 


16300 


5.970 


37% 


2,930 


18% 


♦Bedford 


6,900 


3310 


48 






♦Benton 


3300 


450 


14 






♦Bledsoe 


1,600 


320 


20 






Blount 


15300 


4300 


28 


1,680 


11 


♦Bradley 


8,900 


1,030 


12 






♦Campbell 


8,400 


890 


11 


• 


• 


♦Cannon 


2300 


1,100 


48 






♦Carroll 


7.700 


1,090 


14 






♦Carter 


11.100 


3,030 


27 






♦Cheatham 


2300 


13S0 


57 






♦Chester 


2,900 


810 


28 






♦Claiborne 


5.700 


830 


15 


• 


• 


tClay 


2,100 


800 


38% 






♦Coffee 


7300 


3330 


48 






♦Crockett 


4,400 


1,670 


38 






♦Cumberland 


4,700 


750 


16 






Davidson 


96,400 


76,730 


80 






♦Decatur 


2,500 


280 


11 






+De Kalb 


2,600 


990 


38 






♦Dickson 


5300 


3,020 


57 






♦Dyer 


9.400 


3.560 


38 






♦Fayette 


6.100 


2.140 


35 






♦Fentress 


3.400 


510 


15 






♦Franklin 


6.400 


830 


13 






Gibson 


14.400 


2.740 


19 






♦Giles 


7,100 


920 


13 






♦Grainger 


3.000 


420 


14 




• 


♦Greene 


10.900 


1380 


13 






♦Grundy 


3,000 


1.080 


36 






Hamilton 


62,500 


11.190 


18 






♦Hancock 


2,100 


290 


14 


• 


• 


♦Hardeman 


5300 


2,650 


51 






♦Hardin 


4.300 


1300 


28 






♦Hawkins 


7,600 


910 


12 






♦Haywood 


6300 


3310 


51 






♦Henderson 


4.500 


540 


12 






♦Henry 


7.000 


1,470 


21 






♦Hickman 


3300 


1.490 


45 






♦Houston 


1,100 


520 


47 






♦Humphreys 


3,000 


1.410 


47 






♦Jackson 


2,800 


1,060 


38 






♦Johnson 


2.800 


760 


27 






Knox 


65,600 


16380 


26 


12350 


20% 


♦Lake 


3.000 


750 


25 






♦Lauderdale 


6,700 


3.400 


51 






♦Lawrence 


7.400 


1.010 


14 






♦Lewis 


1.500 


680 


45 






♦Lincoln 


6300 


820 


12 






♦Loudon 


6300 


1.450 


23 


• 


• 


♦McMinn 


8.600 


1,030 


12 






♦McNairy 


5300 


1.460 


28 






♦Macon 


3,700 


1,430 


39 






Madison 


17,500 


5,590 


32 






♦Marion 


5.100 


1.840 


36 






tMarshall 


5300 


2.760 


53 






♦Maury 


11.500 


5.140 


45 






♦Meigs 


1,300 


260 


20 






♦Monroe 


5,800 


1,330 


23 


• 


• 


♦Montgomery 


11.700 


5.440 


46 






♦Moore 


1300 


160 


13 






♦Morgan 


3300 


500 


15 






♦Obion 


8,600 


2.110 


25 






♦Overton 


4300 


630 


15 






♦Perry 


1,400 


ISO 


11 






^Pickett 


900 


140 


IS 






’Polk 


3.300 


400 


12 






♦Putnam 


8300 


3,030 


37 






’Rhea 


4.100 


800 


20% 






♦Roane 


8,500 


1.960 


23 


* 


* 


♦Robertson 


7.300 


4.110 


56 






Rutherford 


11,300 


7.770 


69 






♦Scott 


4.100 


410 


10 


• 


• 



10 



^Sequatchie 1300 260 20 

Shelby 148,000 115,100 78 



^^Smith 


3.600 


1,370 


38 






■•^Stewart 


2,100 


990 


47 






Sullivan 


27,500 


9,320 


34 






^Sumner 


9,300 


5,550 


60 






^Tipton 


7,700 


2,660 


35 






^Trousdale 


1,600 


610 


38 






^Unicoi 


4,000 


680 


17 






■^Union 


1,800 


250 


14 


• 


* 


^Van Buren 


800 


160 


20 






^Warren 


6.500 


2,300 


35 






♦Washington 


15,800 


2.650 


17 






♦Wayne 


3.400 


370 


11 






^Weakley 


8300 


1,740 


21 






tWhite 


4,200 


1,600 


38 






♦Williamson 


6300 


3380 


53 






♦Wilson 
TV countie$ 
other countUs 
total 


7.600 


4.560 


60 






892,800 

23,100 


379,220 

1,970 


42% 

9% 


19,320 


2% 


915^00 


38/./90 


42% 


19^20 


2% 



TEXAS 












TV counties total families 


TV families 


JJHF famihUs 


♦Anderson 


9,000 


1,420 


16% 






Angelina 


11,100 


2,540 


23 






♦Aransas 


1300 


250 


21 






♦Archer 


1,800 


380 


21 






♦Armstrong 


500 


80 


16 






♦Atascosa 


4,900 


2.590 


53 






♦Austin 


4,500 


1350 


30 






♦Bailey 


2300 


1,080 


49 






♦Bandera 


1.100 


670 


61 






♦Bastrop 


5,400 


1,540 


29 






♦Baylor 


2300 


460 


21 






♦Bee 


5.000 


2.150 


43 






Bell 


23.000 


7320 


32 






Bexar 


142300 


104380 


74 






♦Blanco 


1300 


340 


26 






♦Borden 


200 


40 


18 






♦Bosque 


3.400 


680 


20 


• 


• 


Bowie 


20.000 


1.980 


10 






Brazoria 


15,700 


8,780 


56 






Brazos 


11300 


2,120 


19 






♦Brewster 


1.900 


280 


15 






♦Briscoe 


900 


140 


16 






♦Brooks 


2,700 


510 


19 






♦Burleson 


3,400 


950 


2S% 






tCaldwell 


5,000 


1,400 


28 






♦Calhoun 


3.000 


630 


21 






♦Callahan 


2.700 


430 


16 






♦Cameron 


36,000 


9,560 


27 






♦Camp 


2,600 


650 


25 


• 


• 


♦Carson 


1300 


290 


16 






♦Cass 


6300 


1,760 


26 


• 


• 


♦Castro 


1,600 


260 


16 






♦Chambers 


2300 


1330 


58 


• 


• 


Cherokee 


10300 


1310 


12 


• 


• 


♦Childress 


3,700 


590 


16 






♦Qay 


3,000 


1390 


S3 






♦Cochran 


1,700 


830 


49 






’Coke 


1300 


200 


17 






♦Coleman 


4,400 


750 


17 






’Collin 


12,600 


5,130 


41 






♦Collingsworth 


2,400 


380 


16 






♦Colorado 


5300 


1.700 


32 






♦Comal 


5300 


1390 


27 






♦Concho 


1,400 


220 


16 






♦Cooke 


6300 


3.480 


54 






’Conle 


1300 


300 


20 






♦Crosby 


2.700 


1,110 


41 






♦Culberson 


500 


70 


14 






’Dallam 


2.400 


1340 


56 






Dallas 


222300 


161380 


72 






♦Deaf Smith 


3.100 


530 


17 






’Delta 


2300 


350 


16 






♦Denton 


12,000 


6,060 


51 






’De Wilt 


6,700 


2.010 


30 






♦Dickens 


1300 


360 


20 






♦Dimmit 


2,400 


770 


32 






♦Donley 


1,600 


260 


16 






♦Duval 


3300 


1,020 


31 






♦Kaslland 


7300 


1,190 


16 






Ellia 


13300 


6350 


47 






El Paw 


56.100 


39380 


70 






♦Frath 


5,700 


1,110 


19 


• 


• 


’Fall, 


7,100 


1.420 


20 


• 


• 


♦Fayette 


7,000 


2340 


32 






♦Fisher 


2300 


590 


21 






♦Floyd 


3300 


1310 


41 






♦Foard 


1,000 


200 


20 






♦For! Bend 


7300 


2350 


30 






♦Franklin 


1300 


220 


14 


• 


• 


’Frio 


2,700 


1.430 


53 







Galveston 

♦Garza 

♦Gillespie 

♦Goliad 

♦Gonzales 


38,000 

1,800 

3.300 

1.300 

5.300 


15,900 

320 

530 

270 

1.640 


42 

18 

16 

21 

31 






♦Gray 


7,900 


1,640 


21 






Grayson 


22,400 


6,010 


27 






Gregg 


19,100 


5,320 


28 


3,710 


19% 


♦Grimes 


4,000 


1,760 


44% 






♦Guadalupe 


7,100 


2,680 


38 






’Hale 


9,300 


3,790 


41 






’Hall 


3,000 


480 


16 






♦ Hamilton 


3,300 


660 


20 


• 


• 


♦Hansford 


1300 


670 


56 






♦Hardeman 


3300 


680 


21 






♦Hardin 


6,000 


1330 


21 






Harris 


290.600 


201360 


69 


* 


• 


Harrison 


13,000 


1,790 


14 


• 


• 


♦Hartley 


400 


220 


56 






’Haskell 


3,900 


640 


16 






♦Hays 


4,700 


1320 


26 






♦Hemphill 


1,300 


260 


20 






♦Henderson 


6300 


930 


15 






Hidalgo 


43.700 


13370 


31 






’Hill 


9300 


4,780 


52 






♦Hockley 


6,700 


3350 


49 






♦Hood 


1,400 


670 


48 






♦Hopkins 


6,700 


1,070 


16 






♦Howard 


8300 


1,480 


18 






♦Hudspeth 


uoo 


150 


14 






Hunt 


12,700 


8,580 


68 






♦Hutchinson 


11.100 


6,140 


55 






’Jack 


2,300 


1320 


53 






♦Jackson 


3300 


1,410 


37 






♦Jasper 


5,500 


1,100 


20 






♦Jeff Davis 


500 


70 


14 






Jefferson 


64.000 


25330 


40 






♦Jim Hogg 


1300 


120 


10 






’Jim Wells 


7,700 


1.450 


19 






♦Johnson 


10300 


5370 


53 






♦Jones 


6300 


1,450 


21 






♦Karnes 


4,100 


1320 


37 






♦Kaufman 


7,900 


3,510 


44 






’Kendall 


1,700 


1,040 


61 






♦Kenedy 


100 


20 


19 






♦Kent 


400 


70 


18 






♦Kerr 


4.500 


690 


15 






♦Kimble 


1.100 


180 


16 






’King 


200 


40 


20 






♦Kinney 


400 


70 


18 






♦Kleberg 


6,900 


1310 


19 






♦Knox 


2300 


560 


20 






♦Lamb 


6,000 


2.940 


49 






♦La Salle 


1,900 


610 


32 






♦Lavaca 


6300 


1,920 


31 






♦Lee 


2300 


780 


28 






♦Liberty 


8,000 


4,640 


58 


• 


• 


♦Limestone 


6,700 


1340 


20 


• 


• 


♦Lipscomb 


I.lOO 


220 


20 






♦Live Oak 


2.100 


670 


32 






Lubbock 


37300 


21,040 


56 






♦Lynn 


3.000 


540 


18 






♦ McCulloch 


3,400 


540 


16 






McLennan 


41300 


10,530 


267o 


6,730 


\6% 


’McMullen 


500 


160 


32 






♦Madison 


2,000 


880 


44 






♦ Marion 


2.600 


650 


25 


• 


• 


♦Mason 


1,500 


240 


16 






♦Matagorda 


6.500 


2,410 


37 






♦Maverick 


2.900 


520 


18 






♦Medina 


4,700 


2330 


60 






♦Menard 


1,000 


160 


16 






■^Milam 


6300 


680 


11 






’Mitchell 


4300 


770 


18 






♦Montague 


5.000 


2.650 


53 






♦Montgomery 


7,500 


4,120 


55 






♦Moore 


5300 


3350 


56 






♦Morris 


2,700 


680 


25 


• 


• 


♦Motley 


1,000 


200 


20 






♦Nacogdoches 


8,100 


930 


11 






Navarro 


11.400 


4,070 


36 






♦Newton 


2,700 


540 


20 






’Nolan 


6300 


1320 


21 






Nueces 


54300 


8,790 


16 






♦Ochiltree 


2,100 


420 


20 






^Oldham 


400 


60 


16 






Orange 


14,400 


6,180 


43 






♦Palo Pinto 


6.000 


2,880 


48 






’Parker 


7300 


3,570 


49 






♦Parmer 


1300 


290 


16 






♦Polk 


4.200 


1,930 


46 






♦Poller 


25,900 


15,930 


62 






♦Presidio 


1300 


210 


14 






♦Rains 


900 


140 


16 






♦Randall 


5,400 


3350 


62 






’Real 


700 


130 


18 






’Red River 


5,900 


860 


15 


• 


• 



♦Refugio 

♦Roberts 

♦Robertson 


2,800 

300 

5,100 


590 

60 

510 


21 

20 

10 


’Rockwall 


1,500 


620 


41 


♦Runmds 


4,900 


830 


17 


♦ Sabine 


2.100 


230 


U 


♦San Augustine 


2,000 


220 


11 


♦San Jacinto 


1,600 


740 


46 



♦San Patricio 
♦Scurry 
♦Shackelford 
♦Sherman 
Smith 


9,500 

8,700 

1300 

600 

22,600 


4.020 

1,460 

190 

340 

3,860 


42 

17 

16 

56 

17 






♦Somervell 


800 


160 


20 


• 


• 


♦Starr 


3.000 


300 


10 






♦Stephens 


3.400 


510 


15 






♦Stonewall 


800 


170 


21 






♦Swisher 


2.500 


400 


16 






Tarrant 


138,400 


96.840 


70 






Taylor 


20,900 


8,780 


42 






♦Throckmorton 800 


130 


16 






♦Titus 


5.100 


710 


14% 


• 


• 


Tom Green 


20,100 


6.170 


31 






Travis 


47,900 


17,000 


35 






♦Trinity 


2,700 


1340 


46 






♦Tyler 


3.100 


620 


20 






♦Upshur 


5,400 


1,350 


25 


• 


• 


♦Uvalde 


4,700 


870 


19 






♦Van Zandt 


6.300 


2,840 


45 






♦Victoria 


9.600 


].%0 


20 






♦Walker 


4,900 


2340 


46 






♦Waller 


3300 


1,760 


55 






• ♦W'ashington 


5,700 


2,480 


44 






’Webb 


13,600 


1.360 


10 






♦Wharton 


10.100 


3,650 


36 






♦Wheeler 


2.800 


560 


20 






Wichita 


31,700 


17,820 


56 






♦Wilbarger 


6.100 


1,300 


21 






♦Willacy 


5,900 


1,530 


26 






Williamson 


11.200 


3.960 


35 






♦Wilson 


3.600 


U30 


37 






♦Wise 


4,700 


2.400 


51 






’Wood 


6,100 


980 


16 






♦Young 


5,000 


750 


15 






♦Zapata 


1.000 


100 


10 






♦Zavala 


2.600 


470 


18 






TV counties 


2,252,100 


1,059,980 


47 % 


42,970 


2 % 


other counties 


160,700 


8,540 


s% 


780 


LT 


total 


2,412.800 


1,068,520 


U% 


43,750 


2% 


UTAH 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF famUies 


Box Elder 


5,400 


3,630 


61% 






♦Cache 


9,300 


3,490 


38 






Davis 


10,500 


6,620 


63 






♦Juab 


1,400 


340 


24 






’Millard 


2,400 


580 


24 






♦ Morgan 


600 


230 


38 






’Rich 


500 


190 


38 






Salt Lake 


87,700 


66,110 


75 






♦Sanpete 


3,800 


890 


23 






♦Sevier 


3,300 


790 


24 






Tooele 


5,400 


3,150 


58 






Utah 


23,500 


15,930 


68 






Weber 


27,600 


17,800 


64 






TV counties 


181,400 


119,750 


66% 






other counties 


26300 


570 


2% 






total 


207,600 


120,520 


58% 






VERMONT 












TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Addison 


5.200 


1.250 


24% 






♦Bennington 


7,500 


3330 


51 






♦Caledonia 


7300 


840 


12% 






Chittenden 


17,400 


5,120 


29 






♦Essex 


1,800 


220 


12 






♦Franklin 


8,400 


1310 


22 






♦Grand Isle 


800 


170 


21 






♦Lamoille 


3,100 


650 


21 






♦Orleans 


5300 


700 


12 






♦Rutland 


13,400 


6310 


51 






♦Washington 


12.100 


2.960 


24 






TV counties 


82,700 


24,360 


29% 






other counties 


25300 


1,570 


6% 






total 


108,500 


2S$30 


24% 







VIRGINIA 

TV counties 


total families 


TV families VHF families 


♦Accomack 


10,200 


3.340 


33% 


♦Albemarle 


13,700 


3,720 


27 


♦Alleghany 


7.700 


3.080 


40 



U 



■^Amelia 


1.500 


590 


39 






^Amherst 


4300 


1.640 


38 






^Appomattox 


1.900 


720 


38 






Arlington 


69,500 


66,730 


96 






Augusta 


17.500 


4.650 


27 






tBath 


1.400 


350 


25 






tBedford 


7.300 


2330 


31 






^Bland 


1,400 


360 


26 






^Botetourt 


3,900 


1.560 


40 






^Brunswick 


4,400 


1,410 


32 






*^Buchanan 


8.000 


1,650 


21 






'^Buckingham 


2,700 


1340 


46 






Campbell 


21.100 


10,830 


51 






^Caroline 


2.700 


1,490 


55 






"♦Carroll 


6,800 


1320 


18 






"♦Charles City 


900 


520 


58 






♦Charlotte 


3300 


1320 


38 






Chesterheld 


13,600 


9,030 


66 






tClarke 


1,800 


830 


46 






♦Craig 


700 


280 


40 






♦Culpeper 


3,300 


1.950 


59 






♦Cumberland 


1,500 


690 


46 






♦Dickenson 


5.000 


1,000 


20 






Dinwiddie 


13,700 


7,400 


54 






♦Essex 


1,300 


720 


55 






Fairfax 


32,100 


29,160 


91 






♦Fauquier 


5,400 


3,140 


58 






♦Floyd 


2,700 


490 


18 






♦Fluvanna 


1,700 


780 


46 






♦Franklin 


5,600 


1,680 


30 






♦Frederick 


9,300 


4320 


46 






♦Giles 


5.000 


2,650 


53 






♦Gloucester 


3,100 


1,840 


59 


340 


11% 


♦Goochland 


1,700 


660 


39 






♦Grayson 


5.500 


1,430 


26% 






♦Greene 


1.100 


300 


27 






♦Greensville 


3,900 


1350 


32 






♦Halifax 


9,600 


3,700 


39 






♦Hanover 


5,700 


3.120 


55 






Henrico 


87,000 


65,970 


76 






Henry 


12,900 


6,100 


47 






♦Highland 


700 


180 


25 






♦Isle of Wight 


3.700 


1,700 


46 


• 


• 


♦James City 


2,800 


1,670 


60 


310 


11% 


♦King & Queen 


1,400 


770 


55 






♦King George 


1,800 


1,080 


60 






♦King William 


1,900 


1,050 


55 






♦Lancaster 


2,300 


760 


33 






♦Lee 


8,000 


1,070 


13 






♦Loudoun 


5300 


3,170 


61 






♦Louisa 


3,100 


1,220 


39 






♦Lunenburg 


3,500 


1,120 


32 






♦Madison 


2,100 


590 


28 






♦Mathews 


1,700 


1,020 


60 


190 


11 


♦Mecklenburg 


8,100 


2,660 


33 






♦Middlesex 


1.900 


1,140 


60 


210 


11 


♦Montgomery 


10,400 


5,550 


53 






♦Nansemond 


10,000 


4.660 


47 


• 


• 


♦Nelson 


3,200 


1320 


38 






♦New Kent 


1,000 


550 


55 






Norfolk 


129.800 


94,910 


73 


25,410 


20 


♦Northampton 


4,700 


1.500 


32 






♦Northumberland 


2,600 


850 


33 






♦Nottoway 


4,400 


2,060 


47 






♦Orange 


3300 


860 


27 






tPage 


4,000 


1,120 


28 






tPalrick 


3,600 


650 


18 






Pittsylvania 


26,500 


10,940 


41 






♦Powhatan 


1300 


470 


39 






♦Prince Edward 


3,900 


1,790 


46 






♦Prince George 


7,000 


4,050 


58 






Princess Anne 


12,800 


8,160 


64 


2,610 


20 


♦Prince W'illiam 


5300 


3360 


62 






tPulaski 


7,500 


3,980 


53 






♦Rappahannock 


1,300 


770 


59 






♦Richmond 


1,300 


780 


60 






Roanoke 


39,000 


21,500 


55 






♦Rockbridge 


7300 


1.760 


24 






Rockingham 


12.500 


3,380 


27 






♦Russell 


6,100 


1320 


20 






♦Scott 


6.600 


860 


13 






♦Shenandoah 


5,700 


1,580 


28 






♦Smyth 


7,100 


1,140 


16 






♦Southampton 


6300 


2,900 


46 


• 


• 


♦Spotsylvania 


6.400 


3.800 


59 






♦Stafford 


3300 


1.920 


60 






'Surry 


1.500 


900 


60 


170 


11 


♦Sussex 


2300 


1,620 


58 







♦Tazewell 


11,400 


1,780 


16 






♦ W'arren 


4,400 


2,020 


46%, 






Warwick. Newp’t 45.200 


30,460 


67 


13.910 


31%, 


Washington 


13,200 


1,340 


10 






♦ W'estmoreland 


2.800 


1,680 


60 






Wise 


13,500 


3,370 


25 






♦Wythe 


5,700 


1,430 


25 






'York 


3,300 


1,940 


59 


290 


11 


Ty counties 


919,100 


510,970 


56% 


43,900 


5% 


total 


919.100 


510.970 


56% 


43,900 


5% 


WASHINGTON 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Adams 


2,300 


370 


16%, 






♦Asotin 


3.800 


800 


21 






'Clallam 


8,900 


4,570 


51 






Clark 


31.500 


16,060 


51 


14,530 


46%) 


♦Columbia 


1,400 


290 


21 






Cowlitz 


18,000 


5.060 


28 


3,610 


20 


'Ferry 


900 


290 


32 






♦Franklin 


5,300 


850 


16 






♦Garfield 


900 


190 


21 






♦Grant 


8,400 


1,330 


16 






♦Grays Harbor 


17,500 


2,880 


16 






♦Island 


4,100 


3,030 


74 






♦Jefferson 


3,700 


1.920 


52 






King 


266.800 


164,660 


62 






♦Kitsap 


28.500 


21,170 


74 






Lewis 


14.300 


2,090 


15 






♦Lincoln 


3,300 


1,060 


32 






♦Mason 


5,200 


3,070 


59 






♦Pacific 


5.700 


910 


16 






♦Pend Oreille 


2,300 


740 


32 






Pierce 


92300 


56,050 


61 






♦San Juan 


1.200 


420 


35 






♦Skagit 


13,900 


4,930 


35 






Snohomish 


39,200 


27,620 


70 






Spokane 


78,000 


37,390 


48 






♦Stevens 


5.500 


1,770 


32 






♦Thurston 


15,700 


9370 


59 






♦Wahkiakum 


900 


140 


16 






Whatcom 


22,400 


3,910 


17 






♦Whitman 


9,400 


2,000 


21 






Yakima 


45,100 


10,010 


22 


9,110 


20 


TV counties 


756,400 


384,850 


51% 


27,250 


4% 


other counties 


72.400 


2,210 


3% 


1,050 


1% 


total 


828,B00 


387,060 


47% 


28,300 


3% 


WEST VIRGINIA 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Barbour 


5,100 


770 


15% 






♦Berkeley 


8,700 


4,670 


54 






♦Boone 


7,900 


2,770 


35%, 


950 


12% 


♦Braxton 


4300 


800 


19 






♦Brooke 


7,400 


5,180 


70 


• 


• 


Cabell 


34.400 


27390 


79 






'^Calhoun 


2,300 


640 


28 






♦Clay 


3,500 


1,190 


34 






♦Doddridge 


2.200 


420 


19 






Fayette 


20300 


6,080 


30 






♦Gilmer 


2,300 


440 


19 






♦Grant 


2,300 


410 


18 






♦Greenbrier 


9,900 


2.440 


25 






♦Hampshire 


3300 


580 


18 






♦Hancock 


9.300 


6,430 


69 


• 


• 


♦Hardy 


2.400 


430 


18 






Harrison 


24,100 


3,560 


15 






♦Jackson 


3,900 


1.090 


28 






♦Jefferson 


4,600 


2,480 


54 






Kanawha 


68.200 


48,810 


72 


26,500 


39 


♦Lewis 


5,100 


910 


18 






♦Lincoln 


5,000 


2,900 


58 


600 


12 


Logan 


18,500 


8,040 


43 






McDowell 


22,800 


11370 


49 






Marion 


20,700 


8,640 


42 






Marshall 


9.800 


3320 


33 






♦ Mason 


6300 


3.670 


58 


800 


12 


Mercer 


19,500 


7,580 


39 






♦Mineral 


6300 


1,120 


18 






Mingo 


11,400 


6,050 


53 






Monongalia 


16,600 


7,480 


45 






♦ Monroe 


3300 


770 


24 






♦Morgan 


2,400 


430 


18 






♦Nicholas 


6,800 


2,350 


35 






Ohio 


21,200 


11,140 


53 


• 


• 



♦Pendleton 


2,100 


380 


18 






♦Pleasants 


1,700 


340 


20 






♦Pocahontas 


3,000 


450 


15 






♦Preston 


8,000 


2,090 


26 






♦ Putnam 


5300 


3,070 


58 


640 


12 


Raleigh 


24300 


6.130 


25 






♦Randolph 


7,500 


1,080 


14 






♦Ritchie 


3300 


660 


20 






♦Roane 


4300 


1320 


29 






♦Summers 


4300 


1,150 


24 






♦Taylor 


4,900 


1370 


26 






Tucker 


2,600 


470 


18 






♦Tyler 


2.900 


580 


20 






♦Upshur 


5,100 


770 


15 






Wayne 


8,600 


4370 


57 






♦Webster 


4300 


1,430 


34 






♦Wetzel 


5300 


980 


19 






'Wirt 


1300 


340 


28 






Wood 


20,100 


6330 


34 


3,160 


16 


♦Wyoming 


9,100 


3.160 


35 


1,020 


12 


TV counties 


529,600 


229,320 


«% 


35,990 


7% 


total 


529,600 


229320 


43% 


35,990 


7% 


WISCONSIN 










TV counties 


total families 


TV families 


VHF families 


♦Barron 


10,400 


3,460 


33%. 






Brown 


28.800 


17.080 


59 






1 Buffalo 


4,400 


1300 


41 






♦Burnett 


3.000 


930 


31 






♦Calumet 


5.400 


2340 


47 






♦Chippewa 


11,700 


3,010 


26 






♦Columbia 


10,600 


2.310 


22 


• 


• 


Dane 


51,100 


20380 


41 


17320 


34%) 


Dodge 


17.100 


10310 


63 






♦Door 


6,600 


1.610 


24 






Douglas 


14,300 


3,400 


24 


3,180 


22 


♦Dunn 


7,900 


2,690 


34 






Eau Claire 


16.900 


5,160 


31 






Fond Du Lac 


20,300 


9,170 


45 


• 


• 


Grant 


12.300 


1,910 


16 






♦Green 


7,600 


1,100 


14 


• 


• 


♦Green Lake 


4.700 


1,030 


22 


• 


• 


♦Iowa 


5,700 


860 


15 


• 


• 


Jefferson 


13,400 


7390 


54 


• 


• 


Kenosha 


24,400 


19,680 


81 






♦Kewaunee 


4,800 


1300 


25 






La Crosse 


20.700 


2.420 


12 






♦Lafayette 


5.300 


800 


15 


• 


• 


♦Langlade 


6.100 


1320 


20 






♦Manitowoc 


20,400 


9.530 


47 






Marinette 


10,500 


1,960 


19 






♦Marquette 


2,800 


620 


22 


• 


• 


Milwaukee 


272,800 


240,000 


88 


79300 


29 


♦Oconto 


7,400 


1.480 


20 






Outagamie 


24,300 


6370 


27 






♦Ozaukee 


7,300 


6,570 


90 


950 


13 


♦ Pepin 


2,100 


860 


41 






♦Pierce 


6,300 


4,160 


66 






'Polk 


7,500 


4,960 


66 






♦Portage 


9,400 


1390 


14 






Racine 


34,800 


25310 


72 






Rock 


30,000 


7.770 


26 


• 


• 


'Rusk 


4.600 


1300 


26 






♦St. Croix 


7.800 


5,150 


66 






♦Sawyer 


3,000 


930 


31 






♦Shawano 


9.800 


1,870 


19 






Sheboygan 


25300 


17,960 


71 






♦Trempealeau 


6,900 


2.840 


41 






Walworth 


14,000 


8,580 


61 






♦Washburn 


3300 


1.030 


31 






♦Washington 


10.400 


9.360 


90 


1320 


13 


Waukesha 


27,400 


20,980 


77 






Waupaca 


10.600 


2.900 


27 






♦Waushara 


4,300 


600 


14 






Winnebago 


28.600 


5370 


19 


2,960 


10 


TV counties 


905.100 


512.100 


57% 108,940 


12% 


other counties 


139.900 


6,780 


5% 


160 


LT 


total 


1.045,000 


578380 


50% 


709300 


70% 



WYOmiNG 






TV counties 


total families 


TV families VHF fiimilies 


Laramie 


15.500 


5350 38% 


TV counties 
other counties 


15,500 

77,600 


5,850 38% 
900 1% 


total 


93,700 


6.750 7% 



12 



11 - 



Financial & Trade Notes: rca’s 1953 sales soared 

to a!i-time high of $853,000,000, up 22.9% from previous 
high of $693,941,000 in 1952, which was 16% above 1951’s 
$598,955,000. Net profits were $35,022,000 ($2.27 per 
share), up from $32,325,000 ($2.10) earned in 1952 and 
$31,193,000 ($2.02) in 1951 but considerably down from 
the record $46,250,000 ($3.10) earned in 1950. Annual 
report released Feb. 27 showed Federal and local taxes 
more than double net profits — amounting to $75,673,000 
($5.39 a share). 

Total current assets at end of year were $349,735,000 
vs. $304,367,000 at end of 1952 and $255,993,000 at end of 

1951. Shipments to armed forces accounted for 19% 
of sales and current backlog of govt, orders was about 
$500,000,000 at year’s end. Additions to plant and equip- 
ment during year amounted to $33,644,000. There were 

65.000 employes at year’s end, up 1000 from 1952, and 
payroll of $281,769,00, compared to $233,848,000 in 1952. 
There were 177,000 stockholders as of Dec. 31. 

Combined gross of RCA Victor, RCA Laboratories